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    4 Replies Latest reply on Sep 30, 2008 1:47 PM by sethstacey

    Three Pitfalls to Succeeding on the Web (or in business..)

    sethstacey Wayfarer
      This is our latest post. It was inspired by several threads on this very mesage board.

      Check it out the article: http://www.firemakerdesign.com/blog/pitfalls-to-excellence
      We are a web design company, and thus we've been dealing with websites
      for a long time. The businesses be have worked with and that have
      succeeded were very passionate about being excellent at whatever they
      did.

      After talking with them, we came up with three huge pitfalls that most
      companies are not willing to go through to have a great online presence.
      • Not willing to sacrifice to be excellent
      • Does not know enough to be excellent
      • Won't change enough to be excellent
      What do you all think? Can you think of any online success that fit snuggly into any of these areas? Can you think of any business that was a runaway success while fitting into any of these areas?
        • Re: Three Pitfalls to Succeeding on the Web (or in business..)
          LUCKIEST Guide
          Pitfalls to Succeeding on the Web

          Only three?? Where are you located??

          SCORE helps people going into business, or who are in business
          eliminate many pitfalls and SCORE is FREE both in person and online.
          • Re: Three Pitfalls to Succeeding on the Web (or in business..)
            Lighthouse24 Ranger

            Interesting . . . I guess it depends on how you define "excellence" and "success." To me, there's a difference -- I'd define excellence as the top 10 percent in a field or industry, and success as consistently achieving the stated business objectives.

            Many websites serve as very effective business assets without being "excellent." Likewise, there are excellent companies (and websites) that reflect only two of three factors mentioned, and successful companies (and websites) that reflect only one of the three (e.g., if a firm has more knowledge than anyone else, then extreme sacrifice and radical change are not that critical -- conversely, if a firm is willing and able to sacrifice anything and change everything, then it doesn't really have to be that knowledgeable).

            The opening line in linked article reads, "Do not do anything that you are not willing to be excellent at." sic To tell a small business owner that seems the same as telling the golfers on the local course that if they can't make the pro tour, they should quit playing. There are all kinds of businesses and all kinds of websites that support or enable all kinds of functions. Excellence is essential for only a select few. (If you're a small business that's trying to compete directly against Amazon, then you probably need an excellent website -- if you're a small business that's trying to compete against the guy floating sheetrock in the office next door, you probably don't.)

            From my perspective, business ownership/management is not about having to sacrifice the most, know the most, and change the most -- nor is it about being excellent at everything. It's about being effective at the right things.

            Perhaps other business owners will share their views on this . . .

              • Re: Three Pitfalls to Succeeding on the Web (or in business..)
                sethstacey Wayfarer
                Lighthouse,

                Thanks for the response!

                I was seeing excellence as striving to be the best (I liked your definition of top 10% in a field or industry). I did not mean to convey that if you are not good at golf (or at whatever your business is) you should stop it altogether, but instead focus on being excelent in that field. For instance, there are companies we have worked with that are absolutely better than there larger competitors. I would define them as being more "excellent," and in the long run, I have no doubt they will give the competition a run for their money.

                I also like your point on how not all points are needed "if a firm has more knowledge than anyone else, then exterme sacrifice and redical change are not that critical". That is a very good point.

                Anyone else have any thoughts?

                Seth