Post a new topic
    25 Replies Latest reply on Apr 17, 2008 2:36 PM by MnlyTechnlgy

    Misleading Advertising

    25trekker1 Adventurer
      What is the most misleading word used in advertising as well as in general conversation?
        • Re: Misleading Advertising
          Iwrite Pioneer
          "Free."
          "Service."
          "Appreciate."
          "Thank-you."

          Often used, seldom meant.
          • Re: Misleading Advertising
            Lighthouse24 Ranger
            The most misleading word is a word you know to be untrue, but that you tell a listener anyway because you also know it's what he or she wants to hear.
            1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • Re: Misleading Advertising
              puzzleman Tracker
              I Write, I don't think "free" is misleading. Everyone that I have dealt with that offer free, really do offer something for free. It is mostly a hook to get people to look and then make add on sales but it is effective.
              The free item may be trivial but it is free. what do you expect for free?

              Jim
                • Re: Misleading Advertising
                  Iwrite Pioneer
                  Most of the "free" offers I have seen come attached to a purchase of another product. Very seldom do businesses give anything away without you having to purchase something. Is that really "free?"

                  "Free" to me is that you don't have to purchase anything to get the "free" item.
                    • Re: Misleading Advertising
                      Lighthouse24 Ranger

                      I'm not sure I'd agree with "seldom do businesses give anything away without you having to purchase something." I've made nearly a thousand posts in this forum. At least a few of them (I hope) offered some valuable information and advice -- which I gave away absolutely free (I've never sold, or even tried to sell, anything to anyone in this community). How come? The reason is in one of your threads, Iwrite -- it's because I know what I'm really selling.

                      I don't see anything special about that, however -- I think it's the small business norm, not the exception. Everyone has something that he or she can give away freely that has value to others. Giving something away like that is the original technique (or at least one of the oldest) that people have used throughout history to tell a total stranger that they were hoping to not be such strangers anymore. (Sort of a nice Valentine's Day business sentiment, isn't it?)
                        • Re: Misleading Advertising
                          websolutions Tracker
                          I agree with the "Seldom" statement, especially in the Internet industry.

                          Best.
                          WS
                          • Re: Misleading Advertising
                            Iwrite Pioneer
                            I answered for me. Whether you agree or not, doesn't change my stand. Most retailers offer something free but it is a conditional free - you must purchase something else to get the item.

                            You cannot apply my comment to the exchange of information. I was answering the post about words that are used to advertise. Look at the title of this post. Your example is not an advertised offer of free, it is you volunteering information, data or advice - that is not a free offer. Just like giving away free samples is not an advertised offer for free food.

                            Look, I was expressing my view of which words I feel are misleading. I stand by my answers. Nothing written here has given me any reason to do otherwise.
                              • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                Lighthouse24 Ranger

                                Iwrite, I wasn't trying to change your stand -- and I apologize if my response came across that way. Like you, I was just discussing my perspective and experience.

                                Your point that the original question focused on advertising is well-taken. I broadened my response beyond that because I thought you had expanded the discussion. A free food sample may not be an "advertised offer," and donating food to a Food Bank or relief center wouldn't be either -- but both still involve a business giving away something of value for free, and I simply felt that most businesses do that quite extensively.

                                I enjoy reading your responses (websolutions, too, who also disagreed with me), and I LIKE the fact that our views are very similar at times, very different at others. That's the thing that makes these forums so interesting and worthwhile. Thanks!
                                  • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                    Iwrite Pioneer
                                    No problem. We're cool. I agree the exchange of ideas is great. We were just on different pages. I wonder if customers or even members in this forum recognize that they are getting valued product free when we answer questions here? Does it really register or is it something they think is part of doing business?

                                    I think this discussion has run its course, if it ever had one. "Pride" was not on my radar. I don't see it used in advertising much. Wow.
                                    • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                      DomainDiva Ranger
                                      Free...

                                      I got a call one day from a small DC9 operator in the S'West who was having regulatory 'issues' with Canadian component approval tags. They wanted me to come out and oversee a huge component remove/overhaul and replace project.

                                      When I explained to them that the USA had a bi-lateral agreement on the airworthiness of components issue, and they needed to complete a couple of next steps in the regulatory process...so they did not need me. I also gave them the name of a good Designee and the job got done without me.

                                      A couple of years later I actually met up with the person who called me....the bear hug was worth the 'no revenue'. I have an industry friend for life.
                                  • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                    LUCKIEST Guide
                                    Lighthouse24, Another GREAT answer. And yes most of your FREE answers
                                    offered some valuable information and advice -- which you gave away absolutely FREE.
                                    This web site loves the word FREE. That is why I mention SCORE. Another FREE service.
                                    Keep up the great responses.
                                    LUCKIEST
                              • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                websolutions Tracker
                                I think the most misleading word (s) is "Work from home get paid tons of money"
                                • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                  LariosVox Wayfarer

                                  Words such as "Free and up to" and the millions of others are generally just adds to catch your attention, and 99% of time it works! we as consumers have to ask the right questions such as What are the qualifiers for the Word FREE in the business. or Up to - what limitations qualify for "up to" is not misleading is just the beuty of Ads., as consumer of products and services we are responsible for asking the right question, No co. can make us read or understand how they operate as long as it is disclosed to us. Lets face it we have to be smarter consumers and read the fine print!
                                  • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                    MnlyTechnlgy Adventurer
                                    I know this post was a while ago, but I tend to agree with a couple of other posters here. The most misleading word in advertising is "FREE". Yes the product may be free, however they don't tell you that you will need to pay for shipping and handling or processing fees. To me, when I hear the word "free" it means FREE - period. Here's an example: I recently upgraded my accounting program and among the paraphanalia that came with the disc was an offer from VistaPrint for either 250 FREE business cards or a FREE pre-inked stamper. Well, lo and behold, the cards themselves ARE indeed free, but you need to pay the shipping which ends up being almost as much as ordering the 250 cards w/o the free offer.

                                    To be truly "FREE" a product must be designed for free, packaged for free and shipped for free - anything else should be listed as Conditional.

                                    Purely my opinion ...

                                    Deb L
                                    • Re: Misleading Advertising
                                      designer Tracker

                                      *+Fa

                                      Real estate people love this term. Every house is fabulous. Every selection and up-grade option is fabulous. The view is fabulous. The neighborhood is fabulous. The price is fabulous. The developer is fabulous. Fabulous. Fabulous. Fabulous. Give me a BREAK!