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    2 Replies Latest reply on Jan 11, 2011 3:32 PM by Focusnow

    Need more information about dry ice business

    Newbie

      I would appreciate any information on the business outlook of dry ice manufacturing (on a small scale) and marketing. It is a venture I would like to explore but it seems big companies have the market saturated.

        • Re: Need more information about dry ice business
          LUCKIEST Guide

          Dry ice manufacturing starts with  liquid carbon dioxide held under pressure (300 psi) in bulk storage vessels. To  begin making dry ice, the liquid C02, is sent through an  expansion valve into an empty chamber where under normal atmospheric pressure it  flashes into C02 gas. This change from liquid to gas causes  the temperature to drop quickly. About 46% of the gas will freeze into dry ice  snow. The rest of the C02 gas, is released into the  atmosphere or recovered to be used again. The dry ice snow is then collected in  a chamber where it is compressed into blocks,  or various sized pellets  to meet  customers requirements. The denser the dry ice is, the longer it will last, the  easier it is to handle, and the better it will perform when blast cleaning. Also  the

          There are three major types of dry  ice machines.

           

          The first is a dry ice block maker. It can produce a 220 pound  solid block which is usually cut into four 55 pound blocks about 11 inches  cubed. Newer block machines make a 50 pound or even a 10 pound block. Next there  are machines that produce pellets from smaller than 1/8 inch for dry ice blast  cleaning to 3/4 inch in diameter. Sometimes these machines include additional  parts for blast cleaning.  There are only about six major manufacturers in the world. Several additional  companies manufacture small dry ice makers that connect to a CO2 tank and make 5 to 10 pound blocks of lower density dry ice.

            • Need more information about dry ice business
              Newbie

              Luckiest, thank for your response. Yes I have researched into the manufacturing process and all, that really I have a B.S. Chemistry. However I am looking for information on how viable this would be for a small business. All I see are big companies and I am thinking "how will I be able to compete with these established businesses?" I'm more like in the fact finding stage so that I don't get burned beyond repair. I would like to get in touch with someone or an organization that is involved and will be willing to give information.