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    38 Replies Latest reply on Jul 4, 2008 9:31 PM by smallbizinfo

    Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?

    ctal108 Newbie
      Hello:

      If anyone else has successfully done this I would love to learn how you did it. Our company is a LLC and we have been in business for 2 1/2 years. My partner has been working full time and I'm a part-time partner looking to become full-time in the very near future.

      We both have excellent personal credit (750 and above across the three credit bureaus) and we are adamanat about keeping our personal and business credit separate. We have a Dun & Bradstreet profile, and we know that our business credit is being reported to Experiean's business credit center. We have a number of business credit cards, a few vendor lines of credit and we have NEVER been late on any payments. Sounds pretty good right?

      Well here's the thing: We're looking to get a bank business line of credit and/or a small business loan and we want to do it based SOLELY on our business credit and not on the combination of our personal credit and the business credit. But everywhere we look we're hitting brick walls! We have spoken to quite a number of lenders and ALL of them require us to give them our SS# instead of being able to use our EIN#. And that means that we'll have a credit inquiry on our record and if we default on the loan that bad credit WILL show up on our personal credit histories.

      Do any of you know of any tricks or techniques to be able to get financing SOLELY on your business credit/profile?

      Your help and assitance with this is MUCH APPRECIATED!

      thanks!
        • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
          LUCKIEST Guide
          It is great that you have been in business for 2 and 1/2 years. Hopefully you are in the BLACK
          and are showing a profit. It sounds like you are doing all the right moves.
          Is there a local SCORE office where you can talk to Counselors. SCORE is FREE and they
          can help you with a BUSINESS PLAN and they also talk to local bankers.
          I see two problems in what you wrote: When you apply to a bank for a loan, the bank wants to know
          it will get repaid and they are looking at your business BUT they want MORE.That is why they want
          your personal info as well.
          The second problem is that Bank computers talk to each other and if you have applied to many banks,
          it raises a FLAG.
          Do you have an Accountant?? He can probably help.
          Good luck, LUCKIEST.
          1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
              ctal108 Newbie
              Yes we have been in touch with SCORE and they have helped us with a number of things along the way. But I will tell you that the SBA loans DO require collateral (i.e. - your home, real-estate investments etc...) which is why we are looking for alternatives. You might be thinking: "Well if you really believed in this business you wouldn't be afraid to put your house up for collateral". And to answer that we do believe in the business but we also want the business to be truly a separate entity.

              And we haven't applied for ANY loans with the banks. I've just been calling aound to quite a number of lenders and asking questions. So there aren't any unecessary credit inquires in our accounts.
            • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
              Ed O'Gee Adventurer
              Unforunately this will likely be the case with most banks you deal with depending on the size of the loan you want. I will stress that the best thing to do is talk to the banker you deal with most, explain the situation and see if you can get a small line with just the business history with the bank.
              1 of 1 people found this helpful
              • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                Lighthouse24 Ranger

                You may already do this, but part of the "trick" seems to be meeting with an experienced commercial loan officer instead of a consumer rep from the bank. Another key seems to be presenting a history of good ratios and retained earnings on your balance sheet -- but exactly how long the history and how good the numbers have to be is a mystery to me. Until a small business is able to meet whatever that "standard" is (or goes public), even a business with strong profits and a good credit history is usually required to have the owner act as a "co-signer" in effect, to guarantee a bank loan or credit line.
                  • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                    jgoldstein Newbie
                    UNLESS your business has an abundance of liquid (sellable) collateral, banks will require your personal guarantee. If the bank thinks the businesses' collateral could easily be sold to repay the loan, they will not require a personal guarantee.

                    Their reasoning is that if the business experiences a downturn, you might walk away and leave them holding the bag (a bad debt). Having your personal guarantee improves the likelihood they will be repaid promptly. The personal guarantee demonstrates your commitment to seeing the debt is repaid - and legally makes you responsible for the debt in the event the business doesn't/can't pay up..

                    By regulation/law, the SBA REQUIRES personal guarantee on their small business loans, and the pledging of your personal residence.

                    If you were the lender, wouldn't you want this same assurance?

                    Loans to the business, in the business' name DO NOT show up on your personal credit bureau. The fact that you are a business loan guarantor does not affect your credit bureau score (perhaps it should?).

                    jg
                      • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                        ctal108 Newbie
                        I just want to say thank you to everyone who has responded to this question. I spoke to a friend of the family who has about a dozen LLCs (he owns real estate and each property is its own LLC) and he basically said the same thing you've said here. And basically banks are not in the business of helping small businesses -- they're in the business of making money.

                        thanks!
                          • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                            Y Not Mag Newbie
                            Hello this is Jamila Serrant (Owner/Founder of Y-Not Magazine),
                            I too own an LLC and have to agree with your statement regarding "Banks are not in the Business of helping Small Businesses". Who would have thought until you go into business on your own? I am in the process of searching for funding and have hit the same brick walls. However there is a company that claims to have a step to step approach in helping businesses to establish credit as its own entity (using its own EIN for credit purposes). The URL is: www.b2bcredit.com Please perform a Business check on them with the Better Business Bureau because I did not use their services yet. Lastly, I would love to make contact with you since we are both seeking funding for our LLC. Good Luck to us both.
                              • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                ctal108 Newbie
                                Hi Jamila:

                                Yes I've seen that site before. And the biggest benefit they provide, at least from what I've read, is that they help you to establish a business credit profile. But honestly if you're willing to read up on this topic you can do that all by yourself. What it takes is having a legally established business entity (e.g. LLC), getting a small business credit card (in the company's name) and then doing to Dun & Bradstreet and getting a free DUNs number. Also call Experian and make sure they have a profile open for your business and if not they will tell you how to make sure one is open for you.

                                Now for the tricky part: Most, if not all, credit card companies do NOT report to Dun & Bradstreet. Neither do cell phone companies. The trick is to go to your suppliers and find out two things: 1) Will they extend you credit (e.g. NET 15, 30 etc..) AND 2) do they report to any of the credit agencies. Trust me THAT is the hardest part of the process because it is VERY difficult to find a vendor that meets both criteria. And if you DO find one many times they'll extend you the credit if you purchase something like $10,000 worth of merchandise. In my line of business I really have no need of any raw materials that would add up to that much unless I want to buy enough reams of paper to last me until I'm 80.

                                But remember too that most vendors and lenders require you to have been in business a minimum of two years and sometimes three.

                                But lets just say that you DO have a decent business credit profile. You'll still have a problem getting a business loan. Why? Because most banks will only loan you up to 15% of your gross income for the year. So let's say your business grossed $200,000 last year -- that means that at most they'll lend you only $30,000 -- not much if you need serious capital to expand.

                                It is only when your company is grossing $1,000,000 annually will a bank really look at your company as a separate entity. Then you can walk in a get business lines of credit/loans based solely off of your business credit profile. Otherwise you'd better have some other collateral like a home or investment properties.

                                Chris
                              • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                Ed O'Gee Adventurer
                                Not sure what banks you guys are working with but most major banks are in the business of helping small businesses. We as business owners mean more in profits to them than the regular person with a checking account. If you have gone to your bank, shown good business credentials and a quality personal and or business credit history and they still won't help you, then it is time to switch banks!

                                I know personally that both Wamu and bank of america offer business lines of credit where they look at business and/or personal credit histories to make credit decisions.If banks don't lend money, they don't make money, so trust me they are in the business of small business.
                          • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                            Secretaries Newbie
                            There is a wonderful service available that you may want to look into. They will show you how to seperate and establish personal from business credit. They also guide you on how to establish loans for your business. Watch the presentation in the site. It is phenomenal! Yes there is a small fee, but it is well worth it.
                            http://www.creditcoach101.com
                            • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                              Lighthouse24 Ranger

                              For Luckiest (and whoever else may be interested) I checked out this out, and here's what I found. Anyone, please feel free to post corrections if I misunderstood something.

                              http://www.creditcoach101.com will take you to a site operated by Corporate Credit Concepts. This company does NOT provide business loans. It sells you, the business owner, a series of credit building programs.

                              If your credit score is under 680, you must enroll in the Basic Credit Builder Program, where the program "helps" you obtain cash credit (a credit card), mainly by suggesting that you pay your currently overdue bills, and pay your next six months of bills on time. Once you "follow the program" and raise your score to 680 or above, the credit that will be available is estimated at up to $25K, but no minimum amount is guaranteed. The fee for this Basic program is $995 up front and $2,995 once you get a credit card.

                              Then you move up to the Advanced Credit Builder Program, where the program "helps" you qualify for a corporate line of credit. When you complete this program, the credit that will be available is estimated at up to $100K, but again, no minimum amount is guaranteed. The fee for this Advanced program is $995 up front and $4,995 once you qualify for a line of credit. (This is presumably where the person who posted the original question would begin.)

                              Then comes the Ultimate Credit Builder Program, with a fee of $995 up front and $6,995 after the program "helps" you establish another company and obtain cash credit for it (more about the reason for that later).

                              Finally, after two years, you get to the Elite Credit Builder Program, with a fee of $12,995, all up front. This program helps you establish D&B and Paydex files/ratings so you can qualify for up to a $250,000 cash credit line (but as always, this is an estimate, no minimum amount is guaranteed).

                              So . . . all you need to do is spend $31,000 on these programs and pay all of your bills on time for two years, and you will be able to qualify for a credit card and bank loan! If that sounds like a deal, by all means check it out.

                              The website frequently mentions that you can get a corporate line of credit in as little as a week. It's true, you can. You purchase what's called a Shelf Aged Corporation -- the attorney in the office next to me creates them and sells them (lots of corporate agencies and attorneys do). The older they are and the better their rating, the more they cost. (It would appear that you'll create one or more of these yourself as part of the Ultimate program.)

                              Again, if someone has actual experience with these programs and would be able to elaborate on them (or correct anything I might have misunderstood), please post!
                              • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                dmgousse Newbie

                                It's interesting that we are discussing the difficulties of securing a business loan in a Bank of America Small Business Forum. I understand that BOA set up this site for its small business owners to network and to help each other; however, since this area is within BOA's purview a BOA representative in this area should be able to help solve this matter.

                                Virtually every lender that I've encountered on the real estate side want the business owner as a guarantor on the loan even if the business entity was purchasing a warehouse for its business. Even the SBA requires the borrower to be a guarantor on all loan programs.

                                Go to this website an research other alternatives: www.allbusiness.com.

                                Good Luck.
                                  • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                    CorpCons08 Ranger
                                    dm,

                                    Based on my conversations with a few of the administrators of the SBOC; they try to keep out of the conversations in the forums. They leave it to be just what it is, a neutral business exchange where busness owners can help each other through different phases of business development. They do not want to make it a sales pitch for BofA's products or services. I hope this information helps you.

                                    CorpCons08
                                      • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                        LUCKIEST Guide
                                        That is most interesting that BOA does not want to make a sales pitch.
                                        They provide this great website and they also provide SCORE with so MANY publications
                                        that we as SCORE Counselors distribute to the entrepreneurs we counsel.
                                        LUCKIEST
                                          • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                            CorpCons08 Ranger
                                            Well I think they are just trying to be fair to all...
                                            By not providing sales pitches on here, I am more impressed by them.

                                            CorpCons08
                                            • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                              CorpCons08 Ranger
                                              Many times, they are a good recommendation.
                                              Read the post I answered on the investment HELOC.
                                              I researched many banks and it came out that BofA had the offer for the customer.

                                              CorpCons08
                                                • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                  jgoldstein Newbie
                                                  When I was a banker and commercial lender, I often competed with B of A (and its numerous predecessor banks). They were always fair, and well managed. Like any big company, most people there are good, with only a few bad apples.

                                                  I now have a personal account at the local B of A.
                                                    • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                      BuynSell Newbie
                                                      Some people have said that banks look at you differently when you have over $1M of sales. I have to disagree. I do 2M of sales a year, have almost 10 employees and was denied several LOC's. They still rely heavily on personal credit. Its almost like the sales don't even matter. Maybe I'm not talking to the right people, but I bank with BofA, they see my cash flow coming in and out of the account and yet they still denied a simple BofA Business card. My personal banker claims that BofA can give a LOC of up to 15% gross annual sales up to $100k but I highly doubt that.

                                                      My FICO is 660 with a few incorectly reported derogs that are currently being investigated by the credit reporting agencies. The reason for denial?

                                                      1. "Debt is sufficient for current income"
                                                      2. "Derogatory remarks"

                                                      I agree with 2, and like it said its coming off, but #1 is just waaay off. I'm applying for a business loan, and of course my business makes more money than I do, thats because I don't "cash" all my profits out!

                                                      For anyone considering business "credit builder" programs and courses, I would spare the money and do it yourself. I used the business credit forum on creditboards and it has kick started my business credit to overdrive, hopefully to gear up for the LOC's in the future. But just a little teaser... apply for business account at the following merchants, and buy/pay a few times. You'll see it on your DNB soon enough.

                                                      Staples
                                                      Dell
                                                      Home Depot Revolving (not mastercard)
                                                      Uline
                                                      Quill
                                                      Office Depot
                                                      Shell
                                                      Philips Conoco 76

                                                      Now someone teach me how to get a non PG'd LOC :)
                                                        • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                          moogrdotcom Wayfarer

                                                          The best advice i can give is to worry less about personal guarantees and worry more about how your good credit can help the busines get the leverage it needs to get started. Your good credit will lower your cost of debt much sooner than trying to get a few years under your corporate belt. Especially if you are at 750+ already. You would be cheating your business if you didn't take advantage of the opportunity you already have if you ask me :)
                                                          • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                            Y Not Mag Newbie
                                                            Hello All,
                                                            I tend to agree with BuynSell. Almost every lender requires the guarantors personal credit history/credit information. They key to ALSO establishing credit history for your business is:

                                                            1. Make sure the lender (ex. Companies like Home Depot) reports to Dunn & B
                                                            2. Insist on using your TIN or EIN even though your personal credit is also being pulled.

                                                            Signing off,
                                                            YNOT (Jamila)
                                                            • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                              bankpig Adventurer

                                                              BuynSell,

                                                              Congrats on you're $2M in sales. I'm a banker and I have to say EVERYONE looks at you differently when you have over $1M in sales! ;)

                                                              If youwere told you can only get up to $100K you are talking to the wrong banker. Most branch bankers can only submit loans up to $100K (we call this a streamlined application). You should be talking to someone who can work with larger paramenters. This means lost business to the branch when it gets kicked up, so be prepared to be persistant. An honest branchl banker should give you a proper introduction to the right person. Also, when you do a streamlined app, a computer, not a person is reviewing you're loan. With loan application over $100K, you must include your Financial Statements, which tell their own story....

                                                               

                                                              For you information, that 15% of gross is more like 10% (but that isn't written in stone); banks a little tight with their money right now. 15% was last year. To get approved your FICO should be upward of 675; so you're borderline. Not much you can do with debt to income ratio unless you've recently paid down debt and you can show it.

                                                               


                                                              I know that doesn't answer everything, but I hope it helps.

                                                              Regards,
                                                              Bryan
                                                              www.bankpig.com
                                                              • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                                bankpig Adventurer

                                                                BuynSell,

                                                                Congrats on you're $2M in sales. I'm a banker and I have to say EVERYONE looks at you differently when you have over $1M in sales! ;)

                                                                If youwere told you can only get up to $100K you are talking to the wrong banker. Most branch bankers can only submit loans up to $100K (we call this a streamlined application). You should be talking to someone who can work with larger paramenters. This means lost business to the branch when it gets kicked up, so be prepared to be persistant. An honest branchl banker should give you a proper introduction to the right person. Also, when you do a streamlined app, a computer, not a person is reviewing you're loan. With loan application over $100K, you must include your Financial Statements, which tell their own story....

                                                                For you information, that 15% of gross is more like 10% (but that isn't written in stone); banks a little tight with their money right now. 15% was last year. To get approved your FICO should be upward of 675; so you're borderline. Not much you can do with debt to income ratio unless you've recently paid down debt and you can show it.

                                                                 


                                                                I know that doesn't answer everything, but I hope it helps.

                                                                Regards,
                                                                Bryan
                                                                www.bankpig.com
                                                    • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                      LUCKIEST Guide
                                                      Thanks Lighthouse, Not that I am looking for credit, but your great explanation saved me $31,000.
                                                      Thanks again, LUCKIEST
                                                      • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                        CorpCons08 Ranger
                                                        I am going to follow up on this thread as I see much confusion still.

                                                        1. FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS: Financal Institutions have to pull your personal credit history, no matter if your business has an established credit file or not. The reason for this, is you are signing a "personal guarantee" on any loan/line. Read carefully the back or bottom of the application at the financial institution. It clearly states that even if your business was to close operations, you are personally guaranteeing the repayment of the loan. Therefore, they cannot rely solely on business credit files.

                                                        2. DUNN & BRADSTREET: Although I still tend to disagree on establishing a credit file with D&B, for those of you persistent on using it...the easiest way to establish a good credit file is with department store credit cards. This includes Sears, JCPenny, Best Buy, Staples, etc. Charge at least $100.00 on the card and pay it off each month in full. The creditor will report to D&B and within' 3-6 months, your credit score will be at the top of the list.

                                                        I hope this clarifies some of the confusion.

                                                        CC08
                                                          • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                            heavenly91321 Wayfarer
                                                            Okay, with the exception of Staples and possibly Sears (IF applied for correctly), none of the credit cards CorpCons08 mentioned will report to D&B...D&B are EXCLUSIVELY business credit reporting bureau and personal credit cards like Best Buy, JCPenney and the like are PERSONAL consumer cards and report to the three consumer credit bureaus...if you are trying to establish corporate credit, the best spots to start are Staples (usually approve a minimum 2,000 credit line) and Dell(usually start at about 5,000). They will report to all three business credit bureaus, and you will be off and running....make sure you pay close attention to which account you are approved for (usually the revolving) because the interest rates (should you decide to carry a balance, though I don't suggest it if credit building is the sole purpose of the credit lines) can be quite high. Hope this helps!!
                                                          • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                            FinanceHelp4U Wayfarer
                                                            *Hi, I can help you do this - I am a Financial Consultant and own my businesses also. I specialize in helping separate personal credit from business credit. Nobody wants to have their personal assets on the line by signing a personal guaranty for a business loan. I can help you get them separated fairly quickly and get you the type of financing your business needs. We (my other consultants and I) work hard and very efficient to perform this for companies all the time. I even have years of experience working for the U.S. Small Business Administration - so I know many routes to take to get you and your business where you need to be "successful and in your comfort zone". So, instead of worrying all the time about pledging your personal assets, you can get down to the real work at hand.....Contact me - my e-mail is *
                                                            +hardwork70@newwavecomm.net.</<br />Thanks in advance and I look forward to hearing from you and anyone else needing my type of services....*
                                                            • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                              trhaine Wayfarer
                                                              You know if you have a good personal credit. The bank will easily approved you. If you want to seperate your self to your business . its the time you incorporate and get an EIN.EIN is your business identity. that will seperate you from you and your business. To be able to get a busines line of credit and cash credit. you should know the vendor if they are reporting to the D and B and exparian or credit burue. which is very important. Your lucky if they report ,some vendors dont. some company report is staples to your business supp/lies
                                                              Everytime you buy and pay they will report their experienced having business with you if your a good payer or not. You should use the name of your business too.
                                                              You know I joined in business building program. but you know theres a lot of rip off and they taking advantage on you and will promise you everything. Ive learned that this company what they did is really just to charged you with out doin the service, If you find out , your getting hard to refund and they will just ask you for the processing fee to be safe in charged back. Anyway its my experienced .
                                                              anyway Im just sharing what Ive known in your question .. Good luck and God Bless!
                                                              • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                                creditguy Newbie

                                                                First, be aware that asking for the social security numbers of the principals does not, in and of itself, constitute your jointly obligating yourselves with your corporation for the credit. The actual loan document set forth whether or not that is the case. In fact, no lender will provide financing to the corporation alone (without personal guarantees of the principals) without seeing that the principals are clean themselves. This is also a KYC (know your customer) and AML (anti-money laundering) mandate.

                                                                Think of it from the lender's point of view. Not all borrowers who have built good corporate credit are themselves people you would want to lend to. So often the very element that determines if a lender will make a loan to a corporation by itself, is the credit of its principals. Only your good personal credit can substantiate a lender's decision to lend fund to your corporation without your personal guarantee.

                                                                Having said all that, few lenders will provide any credit (other than equipment leases) without a PG. In order to reach the status where you can get such financing, a borrower typically has to be publicly traded with more than 5000 shares a day trading at over $5, or have more than 25 shareholders and net worth of over $5 million, in addition to the strong corporate credit you have built.

                                                                Businesses can establish credit in large amounts ($25k or more) with no personal guarantee, without even a credit check, if you agree to hold the proceeds of the loan on deposit. Then you can make monthly interest payments at 4.9% apr for a while, before returning the deposited loan proceeds to repay the loan.

                                                                This builds business credit in real dollar amounts because it can be done and reported to D&B and Experian Business Credit. You can have more than one account at a time.

                                                                One other possibility: The above lender will give you the option of refinancing their loan to you, using a BofA or other bank loan or bank line of credit. To get it done, the original lender will post an amount equal to your deposited funds as collateral with the bank. Now you become the source of a big deposit and a cash-secured loan or line of credit for bofa or another bank. There is a decent chance that you could get this loan or line with no PG, given your other good credit, if you are willing to disclose your social security numbers, etc.. See http://www.creditloader.com/
                                                                • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                                  TJMorehead Adventurer
                                                                  Hi Ctal108,

                                                                  Separating personal credit from business is doable and recommended. You establish business credit just as you do your personal. Open lines of credit under a Dun & Bradstreet number, which you have to purchase. For more information view my blogpage at www.moreheadsconnections.blogspot.com - See Your B2B Credit Coach post.

                                                                  Take care,
                                                                  TJ Morehead
                                                                    • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                                      jgoldstein Newbie
                                                                      There aren't any "HARD & FAST RULES" concerning the willingness of a financial institution to lend to a smaller corporation/business with or without the owner's personal guarantee. The lender's comfort level is an important factor.

                                                                      Generally, if the company has been profitable for 5+ years, has sales in excess of $1 million, and the amount being borrowed is less than 1/2 of the company's tangible net worth, there is a good possibility the personal guarantee requirement may be waived. Personal guarantees are often waived on vehicle or equipment purchases, as the lender can rely upon the resale value of the collateral in the event of a future default.

                                                                      On the other hand, when financing the purchase of a building by a business, lender's will often demand the personal guarantee. The "QUICK RESALE ABILITY" of the business is also a key determinant.

                                                                      The personal guarantee is there to reassure the lender that if unforseen future problems arise, the owner won't walk away leaving the lender holding the bag.

                                                                      • JERRY*
                                                                    • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                                      bizconsultant Scout
                                                                      We actually work with a program for establishing seperate business credit but even more importantly or primary finance consulting program, The Ultimate Funding Solution, does one better and deals with helping people get funding from the bank they do business with by providing resources to overcome any approval objections (such as no credit, no collateral, no cash flow or bank has reached funding max) If interested in speaking further about these programs, email me your information to ajones@abcsolutions.cjb.net
                                                                      • Re: Separating Personal Credit from Business Credit - How?
                                                                        smallbizinfo Newbie
                                                                        I have a link on my web site to help businesses establish business credit and to help them find lending sources. Visit www.mysmallbizinfo.com. You can input what type of funding you are looking for and they will send you a matched list of lenders. They can also help you determine if you have the right business accounts set up to obtain business funding. It's the best resource for business funding that I've found on line to date.