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Event June:  Organizational Leadership

CommunityTeam Novice
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Every small company is a tribe, in which everyone knows everyone else, or at least knows of them. Small companies tribes often include investors, spouses, attorneys, accountants, and advisors. But not all tribes are the same. What makes the difference in performance, innovation, and the ability to survive and thrive in economic downturns is tribal culture. The five cultures are:

  • Stage One: criminal clusters, such as gangs and prisons, where the theme is "life stinks," and people act out in despairingly hostile ways.
  • Stage Two: the dominant culture in 25 percent of workplace tribes where people say, in effect, "my life stinks," and exhibit behavior of apathetic victims.
  • Stage Three: the dominant culture in almost half of U.S. workplace tribes, where theme is "I'm great." This personally competitive cultural stage produces only limited innovation and almost no collaboration.
  • Stage Four: representing 22 percent of tribal cultures, where the theme is "we're great." Stage four is the zone of Tribal Leadership where the leader upgrades the tribe as the tribe embraces the leader. Stage Four is the beginning of high performance.
  • Stage Five: the culture of 2 percent of the workforce tribes, where the theme is "life is great" and people focus on realizing potential by making history. Teams at Stage Five have produced remarkable innovations, leading their industries and the economy.

In this highly interactive session, Dave Logan, best selling co-author of Tribal Leadership and The Three Laws of Performance shows executives how to upgrade their organization one stage at a time, all the way to Stage Five. The result is unprecedented impact and success.

 


Dave Logan is a USC faculty member, best-selling author, and management consultant. He currently teaches management and leadership in the USC Executive MBA-an area rated #1 on the latest Wall Street Journal ranking of EMBA programs. He is also on the faculty at the International Centre for Leadership in Finance (ICLIF), endowed by the former prime minister of Malaysia, and on the Foundation for Medical Excellence in Portland. From 2001-2004, he served as Associate Dean of Executive Education at USC.

As senior partner at CultureSync, a management consulting firm, Dave works with governments, non-profit organizations, and Fortune 500 companies, including Qualcomm, Intel, Charles Schwab, American Express, and Prudential.

Dave is co-author of four books including Tribal Leadership and The Three Laws of Performance. His books have been on the best-sellers lists of USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, and Business Week.

Dave has a Ph.D. in Organizational Communication from the Annenberg School at USC.

Post a question now, and then join us on June 4 at 2:00 p.m. EST for a response. Or join us during the event and post a question. Dave will try to answer as many questions as possible, but may not get to all of them. Note, you do not need to register for the event. You simply need to be a member of SBOC to post a question. If you don't have a user ID, join now, it's free.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    weldermama Newbie
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    I have inherited a privately held business (well, 50% of it). My contact with the staff will be limited to a key employee or two, and my involvement with the company is supposed to be limited to the board of directors. I am already aware that there some morale issues in the company; mostly fear about potential changes with new ownership. It is, however, doing well, financially. I live several states away from the company.

    What can you suggest as ways for me to provide guidance on internal policies & procedures (which I am well acquainted with) which are desperately needed (the basics don't exist) to position the company for it's "next leap forward" - without appearing to be "taking over" the role that the key man has filled - on his own - for the last 10 years?

    Thanks in advance.

    weldermama
    .

    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
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      This is a great question. The key is to start by getting a read on what people are thinking and saying, rather that impose the basics on them. (Even if you're right, they'll often feel as though they don't have a say, because they don't. When they feel that way, they won't innovate, show initiative, or give their best.) So start by asking people (perhaps through the people who have direct contact) what I call the "Big Four Questions": 1) What's working well; 2) what's not working well; 3) what can be done to fix what's not working well; 4) anything else? When employees answer these questions (they can do so confidentially), you then have the info you need to give them the parts of the basics that they will embrace. Rinse and repeat.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    CommunityTeam Novice
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    Please welcome Dave Logan. Dave will be posting as user Dave99. We're going to start off by having Dave respond to the question posted, and then ask Dave some general questions. While we're doing this, if you have a question please login and post now. If you don't see your question posted, you do not have to repost. We've received it in the queue and will have Dave respond when he gets the chance. Thanks.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    CommunityTeam Novice
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    Dave - what is tribal leadership?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
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      Tribal Leadership is the practice of building a tribe's culture so that it dramatically outperforms other tribes. Let's start with the basics. A tribe is a group between 20 and 150 people. Smaller than 20 is a team; more than 150 is something else (a division, company, etc.). A tribe determines how much work gets done, and of what quality. So tribal leaders are people who focus on build the tribe's culture to Stage Four or Five, at which point the tribe embraces them as the leader. Here's why that's important: as a company's tribe moves from one stage to the next, profits and revenue will generally increase by 300-500%, even in a tough market.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    sammy1 Newbie
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    I run a tech firm and we are in the process of downsizing. During the good times everyone was willing to help each other and share information. I can sense that many of my employees are hoarding information. This is frustrating. What can I do to create a better team atmosphere?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
      Currently Being Moderated
      This is common. Your culture probably regressed from Stage Four to Three. At Four, people help each other, information flows pretty easily, and people have a common sense of their purpose. When something bad happens, like downsizing, people get scared and withdraw to the previous stage. Stage Three is where people try to play chess with the system. They use politics and spies. The hoard information. They gossip about what's going on. Your challenge is to take them back to Stage Four. Here are the steps:
      1. Get everyone together and talk openly about what happened and why. Zappos (a company known for having a great culture) recently had to downsize, and the execs, to their credit, where completely transparent about the process. They also didn't discourage people talking about, including on Twitter.
      2. After people have vented or said whatever they have to say, ask what they like about the company. Ask open ended questions to get down to the most important values--things like integrity, excellence, etc. If that doesn't work, ask them what they think about what's just happened. Again, ask open ended questions. List the core values you're hearing, and ask people if these are the core values of the company. (Do this even if your company already has core values...they often shift during these periods.)
      3. Ask: what can we do to bring these values to life, even in this difficult time? Get them talking about specific projects or initiatives. For example, one company I was just in did this, and people talked about starting a new line of business to provide deeper services to the customers who love the company as much as the employees do. (The core value this brought to life was "community.")
      4. Get specific about who will do what, and by when.

      You want to have these meetings on a regular basis. They can be done virtually, but in person is better.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    CommunityTeam Novice
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    How do you create this?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
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      Start by diagnosing which type of culture you have. Do this by listening to how people talk about themselves, each other, and their work. If they talk in terms of "life stinks," you're probably dealing with Stage One. If they say things like "my life stinks," that's Stage Two. If they constantly talk about themselves--promoting their own accomplishments, you're dealing with Stage Three, the mantra of which is "I'm great...and you're not." If they talk in terms of "we're great," you've got Stage Four. If they are focused purely on accomplishing the mission and doing great things, guided by their values, you've got Stage Five.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    CommunityTeam Novice
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    So what should companies do when they are in stage 2?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
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      The main principle here is that cultures can only move one step at a time. So in the above question, the person's tribes had fallen to Stage Three. Sammy1 has three choices: regress further to Stage Two. Stay at Stage Three. Or move back to Four.

      In this question, the choice is: stay at Two. Regress to One (bad idea). Or move forward one step to Stage Three.

      Stage Two is VERY common today. People look at the 401ks, or wonder how they will afford their kids' tuition. They worry about their job security. They say, in effect, "my life stinks." When this happens, you use a different set of steps to move Two to Three. Here are some that work:
      1. Seek out the person(s) who most want things to be different. In other words, look for the people who are tired of the constant griping.
      2. Off line from the rest of the group, talk Stage Three ("I'm great") to them. Say things like: "I think you have real potential...I think you can become a real leader...I'd like to invest my time to help you get there." The person may resist at first, but if you've chosen the right person, they'll accept your mentoring.
      3. After some time (a day, a week, a month), he'll say, in effect, "you're right. I'm great. These guys stink!" He's now moved to Stage Three.
      4. Ask him: can you do for someone else in the group what I did for you? Normally, he'll say yes and pick out someone to mentor.

      Again: rinse and repeat. Change Stage Two to Three by mentoring, one-on-one, offline from the rest of the group. Talk Stage Three. Wait for them to talk Stage Three back, and then make them mentors.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    Scotcher Novice
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    I am in the consulting business and have many talented employees. I think my employees are in stage 3 "I'm so great." I like the fact that there is competition among my employees, but not so sure this attitude is good for the company in the long run???? How can I channel this self-promoting attitude to be more positive for everyone and for my company?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
      Currently Being Moderated
      Consulting is filled with Stage Three folks. I say this having been in consulting for almost 20 years.

      Yes, the great part of Stage Three is that people will work their behinds off to outperform one another. As my friend David Kelley at IDEO says (referring to Stanford, another Stage Three place): "we win the hell out of the Nobel Prize...but we do as individuals."

      That's the problem. People don't collaborate. Where this is hurting your business is in sales and knowledge management. People hoard what they know, so that they know more than others. Sales leads are MY leads, not our leads.

      Without any hyperbole, if you can transform your sales group to Stage Four, your sales will go up so much it'll seem to people like you must be cooking the books. Likewise, if you can create Stage Four among your top consultants, they'll come up with new types of services, new potential clients to go after, etc. And everyone will have a lot more fun as they make a lot more money.
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
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      In terms of how to channel this self-promoting attitude into something that's better for your company, you have to go through the steps to move from Stage Three to Four. Those are written up above.

      In addition to what's there, consider that your job is "fuse" people in your company together, based on shared values and a common interest. You do this by figuring out what individuals value (remember open-ended questions). Then say something like: "Mary, it makes sense to work with Ted on this project. He's done similar work that can help you. Also, you can help on project xx that he's working on. And having spent time with both of you in the last few days, you are two people who are really into developing your employees. That's a core part of how you both operate."

      As you start "fusing" people like this, ask them: what should we be doing, based on what's unique about our firm and our core values, that we aren't doing? As people get connected at the level of their values, they'll be very interested in putting their ideas forward. As as Stage Four forms, people will add to, rather than top, the ideas of others.

      Also, there's a chapter in Tribal Leadership on how to take Stage Four to the next level of revenue through something called a Tribal Strategy. That would be a great exercise to do. Could get you a big return quickly.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    antiques4me Newbie
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    I can't afford to give my employees a raise or more vacation time. How can I increase their morale AND productivity? what tips do you have?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
      Currently Being Moderated
      Great question.

      First, you have to figure out whether people are in Stage Two or Three. This is critical, because if use the "medicine" that works in stage and the other stage, it can backfire.

      If people are down in the dumps, get them back to Stage Three by using tips in an above post. If they are in Stage Three, again, use the above tips to get them to Stage Four.

      As you do this, you have to emphasize that raises and vacation times will be possible again once we find new sources of revenue, and that you'll need their help and insights in doing that. It it's a "we're in this together...and we can get out of this together," you have a good shot.

      Note that if you have this conversation in a Stage Two group, they'll reject it. "That'll never work...we're in deep trouble...our lives stink" is what you'll get back. No involvement or ideas.

      At Stage Three, you have tiny shot. People will put forward their ideas, but they won't build on what others do. You'll hear things like: "I know how to do this..." or "If you did what I told you do before, we wouldn't be in this mess." Lots of "I'm great (and you're not."

      If you can get them to Stage Four, it'll be a different game, as we've been discussing on this threat. It becomes almost easy to get great results in a short period of time.

      Remember: Stage Four is what launched this country. It's what led to the most important scientific advances in history. It can certainly help your company get raises and vacation days.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    CommunityTeam Novice
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    Dave - can you tell us what is Stage 5 and how do you get there?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
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      Stage Five rocks. Most people have never seen one of these groups, but we've read about them in books. Think the group that built the first Macintosh, or groups at Pixar that have never had a flop.

      What marks Stage Five is a "life is great" view. There is no competition. They are guided only by their values.

      Know that Stage Five only lasts for a short period, and then groups regress to Stage Four. But some companies have moved in and out of Stage Five many times, producing world-changing products (like the I-Pod).

      Remember that tribes only move one stage a time. So only Stage Four can move to Five. If you're got a group at Stage Four, ask them: "what can we do that would make history?" The Gallup Organization asked this question and came up with the first ever World Poll (the entire world speaking with a single voice on key issues like peace in the Middle East).

      Stage Five is where really remarkable things happen. I hope you all have the opportunity to experience it in your companies...and the results it delivers.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    CommunityTeam Novice
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dave - What recommendations do you have so people can learn more?
    • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
      Dave99 Newbie
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      All this is based on Tribal Leadership that HarperCollins published in 2008, by Dave Logan, John King and Halee Fischer-Wright. It's on Amazon and in most book stores.

      You can go to our web site: www.triballeadership.net and see lots of videos, take a one-minute survey to assess your culture, and sign up a free "Tribal Tip of the Week."

      There's also an audio book you can download, that was paid for by our friends at Zappos.com--the first time a major business book was released as a free audio book. We're grateful to Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh for that.

      Best to all of you--and thanks for reading.
  • Re: Event June 4:  Organizational Leadership
    CommunityTeam Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

     

    Dave thank you so much for your time today. Community if you want to learn more about leadership, please visit:

     

    http://www.culturesync.net/ and http://triballeadership.net/

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