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    16 Replies Latest reply on Oct 17, 2007 4:47 PM by MSH.TRAINING

    Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?

    MSH.TRAINING Newbie
      I am involved in employee development training and have been focusing on Behavior Based Safety Processes. My focus has been on reducing human errors, which in turn reduces accidents and injuries. I have had excellent success with three major clients. Though they've had success, they are reluctant to allow testimonials to be used in my promotional material. The process I have developed includes six self coaching skills that, when endorsed by employees, reduces human errors, accidents, and injuries. These skills also increase communication, coooperation and teamwork among employees.

      I feel that the Human Error Reduction approach is an important and significant. I just don't understand the reluctance of business to pursue it. It may be related to my marketing approaches -- mailings, e-mails, post cards, etc. Any suggestions and/or ideas will be greatly appreciated.
        • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
          DomainDiva Ranger
          This is a new from of behavior modification (for the better it seems). You seem to be breaking into a totally new area of human - workplace interaction, that could be the reason why clients are reluctant to give testimonials. Its NEW and no one likes to be the first with anything new...people will jump all over an idea afterwards not before.

          I am going to cogitate..... back with you later.
          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
            Lighthouse24 Ranger

            Even though BBS was conceived in the 1930's and the basic models and programs currently being taught and implemented were developed in the late 1970's, I agree with you -- U.S. companies have been reluctant to embrace them. My only successful facilitation experiences have come with prime contractors in tightly regulated industries (e.g., nuclear power) and in industries where reportable incidents are so high that OSHA investigators practically live at their facilities. For these operations, the driving force behind BBS implementation was to keep from losing a contract or to keep a plant from being closed -- not the idea that reducing accidents or injuries would ultimately increase their profits. Because they already had major compliance and liability issues before we began, they aren't about to let me tell their "success story." In fact, my agreement with one prohibits me from mentioning that they were ever a client.

            I would suggest that you focus your marketing efforts on similar facilities in your region -- ones that have a high rate of OSHA reportables (and therefore may have the extra incentive to try to reduce them). Offer specific short-term targets in those terms that your program will help them reach.

            My less successful implementations were because unions fought the concept (fearing it would place the blame for accidents on their workers), or because management didn't have the patience to follow through on what they started. As you know, BBS is not a "quick fix," but that's what so many executives want (and sometimes need) these days -- a positive result they can show next quarter. They won't be around if the payoff takes years (and it probably will unless the place is already in danger of being shut down).

            Hope this helps. Best of luck!
            1 of 1 people found this helpful
              • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
                MSH.TRAINING Newbie
                Lighthouse24,

                Thank you for your response and insights. You obviously have a great deal of experience in this field, and I appreciate your feedback. Everything you have said about industry operations I have experiened first hand. Profit is the motivating force, and relaying "failure" does nothing for this picture. Approaching facilities with a high rate of OSHA reportables is an excellent suggestion--especially with the focus on short-term targets. I am confident that my process can produce reductions that will change this situation for them. This definitely has raised my level of awareness and provides me with a specific marketing approach (THANK YOU!).

                One last thing relates to major barriers that I've encountered. Your comments about unions (BBS only supports management and blames employees) and management needing a "quick fix" continues to be a "hill to climb." Thanks again for your response.

                MSH Training
              • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
                DomainDiva Ranger
                see http://www.enterprisesolved.com.

                website owner is a member here...there may be some collaboration here for you.
                • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
                  WEBillions Adventurer
                  See if you can get anonymous testimonials. That might be easier, since companies might be reluctant to admit they weren't doing things well before you came along.
                  • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
                    score81 Adventurer
                    This is excellent issue, and has a very easy solution. Problem is companies are very reluctant to implement is. Main reason turn around is so much that the effort never stops and management don't want to spend money where there is no number out put.
                    To achieve this goal for training, my suggestion is get the old data of number of cases and after implementation of this process how many error has been saved and in turn how much money has been saved by the company.
                    • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
                      Lighthouse24 Ranger

                      Plants and contractors with hard evidence of a good safety record (e.g., days worked without a lost time injury, OSHA recordable numbers that are well below their industry average) tend to sing it from the mountain tops. It's on their websites, on banners at the plant entrance, in annual reports -- everywhere. So one might assume that competing firms in the same industry are not bragging because they have nothing to brag about.

                      What recognition awards exist for reducing human error? I wonder if you might be able to position yourself as the person/firm to help them win a specific award (and earn bragging rights). It's a subtle difference, but winning an award seems to highlight how exceptional a facility is now, rather than how lousy they were before. This certainly worked for me in helping plants achieve ISO certification, and it might be a way to "tweak" your offering. If there's no such award, you could create one. It may sound like "cheating," but years ago we collaborated with the Navy, a major university, and a respected engineering firm to create a top tier standard for nuclear maintenance -- along with an award for achieving that standard. Of course, we were the experts best positioned to help!

                      I see that this question is "answered," but the ongoing discussion has seemed beneficial . . .
                        • Re: Human Error Reduction -- Is it important to business?  If so, any suggestions for marketing?
                          MSH.TRAINING Newbie
                          Lighthouse 24,

                          You've presented some great ideas. I really like the thought of pursuing awards. VPPA seems to be big with many of my clients. They rely on voluntary participation and that's the main emphasis of my process. I've been so close -- can't see the forest because of the trees-- Stepping back, I can see this might be a very viable approach; companies are usually pretty good about the physical issues of these awards -- I can see where my process could supply the human behavior aspects. Selling BBS as a way of attaining a VPPA award (Star Plant, etc) certainly would be appealing.

                          Your idea of creating an award has started my creative juices flowing. I wonder if an insurance company might be interested in cosponsoring such an award. Sure would provide more credibility. I think I might check this out.

                          Thanks for continuing the discussion. If I indicated the question had been answered, it was unintended. I truly value these exchanges.

                          MSH Training