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    9 Replies Latest reply on Feb 8, 2009 10:45 PM by Iwrite

    Should I lie to you to get your business?

    Iwrite Pioneer
      Well, it really isn't a lie, it is more of an omission.

      I know that the service that you want is not what you need for your situation but it is the only service I provide, and if I fully disclose this fact you'll more than likely go somewhere else.

      What would you do, tell the customer or take their money?  

      I am reading post from individuals on this forum offering services that may or may not be the solution to a business' marketing needs, but these individuals are presenting them as the perfect solution for every business, knowing full well that they are only partially meeting the needs on the business at best.

      Is this good business or telling customers a lie?

      Overstating the power of blogs, SEO, social networking, car wraps, direct mail, referral sites, web design, signs or whatever else you are providing to make money seems like a dangerous way to conduct business. Sooner or later the customer will discover that you were only interested in taking their money and not with helping their business, and then what happens to the business relationship?

      I have more questions than answers on this. This practice bothers me because this is how advertising gets a reputation for lying. It may not really be lying but how would you feel if it was done to you and you realized you had been encouraged to spend your money on something that didn't help your business?

      I don't think I'll ever be a good business man then, if this is how good business is done.
        
        • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
          LUCKIEST Guide
          Should I lie to you to get your business?? YES

          YES in business everybody lies. From our former President to Bernard Madoff. Maybe, Just maybe that is why the economy is in such dire straights. Big brother lies. The Auto industry lies, Banks and real estate companies lie. Accountants and Lawyers lie, not to mention Alex Rodriguez, Barry Bonds, and the other 102
          players that tested positive for steroids. Then there is Michael Phelps, the swimmer.
          Business has gotten TOO BIG, just look at the cost of a 30 second commercial during the Super Bowl.

          Iwrite, As you said, You might not ever be a good business man, BUT YOU ARE A GREAT WRITER and I do enjoy reading your posts.

          Keep posting, LUCKIEST
          • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
            LUCKIEST Guide
            Should I lie to you to get your business??

            YES, Iwire, the whole world lies. I wrote a great reply that YES everybody lies from our former President to Bernard Madoff.
            From Alex Rodriguez to Michael Phelps and more, but the B of A did not post it.
            • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
              LUCKIEST Guide
              Should I lie to you to get your business??

              YES, Iwire, the whole world lies. I wrote a great reply that YES everybody lies from our former President to Bernard Madoff, The Auto industry, Business in general
              From Alex Rodriguez to Michael Phelps and more, but the B of A did not post it.

              To conclude, as you said, you might ever be a good businessman, BUT I THINK THAT YOU ARE A GREAT WRITER. Keep up the GREAT posts,

              LUCKIEST
              1 of 1 people found this helpful
              • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
                Analysight Newbie
                Iwrite,

                If a client were to come to me saying he or she would like to conduct a market research survey to understand concept X, but I know that a survey is not the best means for him or her to obtain the information on that concept, I have an obligation to speak up. Not speaking up on that has too many consequences, including:

                1. The client wastes money and the problem on which the client sought my help will likely remain unsolved;
                2. The unsolved problem lowers the client's perception of my firm's competence;
                3. Inadequate research also lowers the value of market research in the eyes of the client, and may cause him/her to distrust the entire market research industry;
                4. If the client finds out I didn't use the right market research technique, he/she will tell other business colleagues, who may then be predisposed to not work with my firm; and
                5. My firm's reputation and bottom line both take a hit.

                If, however, I told the client a survey was not the best approach, and the client insisted a survey be done anyway, then I have no issue; however, I would state in both the contract and the deliverable that I advised against it.

                Lying or omitting for some fast cash will cost too much in terms of reputation and future cash flow.

                Alex
                1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
                  KatsVoice Newbie
                  Iwrite

                  I'm with you on this. I believe that people / businesses who tout their service as the EZ fix to every business and problem practice business lazily and unethically. The question has to be asked why they would have so little faith in their own product's value that they'd lie about it.

                  It's a very irresponsible way of earning business and as a plan...hurts everyone. The people who practice this method will never see the repeat business and they will always have to work the hardest for their money.

                  Everyone is human and there is quite possibly no person over the age of 15 that can say they have never told a lie. However, most knw it's wrong to lie and there should be no reason to forget that it is a misquided practice in life, business and politics. It cheapens everyone in its path, in my opinion.

                  KatsVoice
                  • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
                    Lighthouse24 Ranger

                    Looking at it as a client, I wouldn't (and don't) give you or your "competitors" the opportunity to lie -- because I wouldn't ask you to write ad copy or optimize my website or shot a TV spot or whatever in the first place. Instead, I'd say, "Here's the outcome I want. Tell me how you'd achieve it, what you'd use to measure the progress, when we'll get there, and how much it will cost."

                    So as professional/business services providers, we can turn the question around and ask, "What type of clients am I seeking -- ones that think in terms of activities, or in terms of results?"

                    When my potential clients are asking for a service to be performed, it usually means they have "self-diagnosed" (i.e., they have identified a potential problem or opportunity, and decided what they want to do to address it -- but they lack the knowledge, skill, or experience to actually handle whatever it is themselves). The challenges with this are: (a) their diagnosis is wrong a good portion of the time, and (b) every charlatan out there who provides a service that's even remotely related can spot these clients as "easy marks" (so they tell them what they want to hear, because the clients won't know enough to know they're being taken advantage of until it's too late). Trying to win a client like this under these conditions is difficult, and trying to keep one is even harder.

                    I prefer clients that have a clear goal or outcome in mind from the start. They know what they want to end up with (or how they want things to be), and if they're uncertain about how to get there, they seek proposals from people who have consistently and successfully produced that result in the past. So my track record matters with them -- plus my proposal will be based on what I can do best to help them realize the outcome they want. It's up to them to decide if I'm offering the optimal solution. If I'm selected, however, they WILL get there -- and we'll both be able to take pride in that.
                    • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
                      DomainDiva Ranger
                      IWrite, You are exactly the kind of person that honest people want to do business with. No bull, just the facts and hard work.

                      I have been lied to by so many people since starting the start up. If I had 5.00 for every 'lie' I had to listen to I sure would not be scrounging for money right now. Fortunately for me, I was able to decipher the lies and tell those people that I would not do business with them...even when I had to hear their version of 'you will be starving in the streets if you don't sign with us..and blah and blah and more blah...'.

                      Luckiest I am hoping you were being sarcastic. Just because 'everyone' is lying does that mean we have to stoop to that gutter level as well? Everyone can see the results of all the lying and the cheating.

                      If I am not up to something in my consulting business I tell my clients that their request is not my strong point and then I reccommend someone good that will help them. I have also given out free advice to people calling me for help and told them that they did not need to hire me and instead to do this and that. I have received referrals from those people as well that made me lots of money, WHY? Because I am a straight shooter.

                      Lying no good people get away with what they get away with as long as they make money. When they loose money then they get into trouble.
                      1 of 1 people found this helpful
                      • Re: Should I lie to you to get your business?
                        Iwrite Pioneer
                        Thanks for the great responses.

                        Analysight: I agree that going for the quick buck is dangerous but look at how many so-called "marketing/advertising professionals" on this forum seem to be only concerned with the fast cash.

                        Katsvoice: Not only can't they keep clients but they can't grow them or get paid what they should be. Their actions devalue the services all advertising professionals offer.

                        Lighthouse: I am always impressed with your view. I was trying to figure out what clients would want and you delivered. I am more concerned and interested in clients who want outcomes. I think you have shown why I need to focus on educating potential clients.

                        DomainDiva: The fact that people are willing to so quickly and easily toss aside their honor for pennies is amazing. In the end, all I have is my name and I'm not willing to tarnish that for chump change.

                        I hope more people chime in this subject. I like to see where it will go.