Why the Tax Resolution Space Needs to Change

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    Teaspiller is an online tax help site, and after talking to many of our customers about their past experiences, we realized that there are some major problems in the tax debt/audit resolution space. Now that we're past April 15th, the IRS has started to mail audit notices and the like. In the unfortunate event that you or your business are the subject of an audit, you should be aware of these problems.

    The Problems in the Tax Resolution Space

    1. Poor Customer Service. Customers don't always get consistent service, often being ignored or playing phone tag with their tax resolution firm during the 3 - 9 months it usually takes to resolve an IRS tax audit problem. There wasn't an easy way for customers to monitor where they were in the tax resolution process as well, adding more customer frustration and stress to an already difficult situation.

     


    2. Exorbitant tax resolution prices. A lot of the larger tax resolution firms have historically used television advertising and employ more sales and account managers than actual tax experts. This adds overheads to your tax resolution price - which can be an added burden for many customers already experiencing financial hardships.

     


    3. Billing problems. Customers were confused by the pricing policies of tax resolution firms and wanted more clarity. They also wanted more control over when they were charged, clearly tying tangible work done on their IRS cases to payment.

     


    4. Overpromising, under delivering. There has historically been a lot of false advertising and unclear claims to customers on drastically reducing their IRS bill. Nobody can actually guarantee a reduction or dismissal of IRS claims since each case is unique.

    When choosing a tax resolution service firm, do some research on the firm and the tax expert on your case. Try the Better Business Bureau (http://www.bbb.org/) to see if there have been any complaints against your tax resolution firm. Also, verify that your tax expert is a CPA, IRS Enrolled Agent or Lawyer since they're the only certifications that the IRS will accept as representation.