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4 Posts authored by: Carol Roth

Carol Roth Headshot.pngTechnology – for better or for worse – has created the ability for you to connect with almost anyone, whether it’s a business professional you admire, a peer you desire to partner with or a potential future investor. In the movie “Wall Street,” Bud Fox had to regularly call Gordon Gekko’s assistant to try to get into the door. Nowadays, you can tweet, follow, “friend” and comment your way into a dialogue with just about anybody, including those people who can help you and your business.

 

However, when it comes to making those connections, far more people are bad at taking advantage of the opportunity than are good.

 

There is a protocol to getting noticed if you are looking to establish a relationship. Here are some of the do’s and don’ts that can help you meaningfully connect with influencers.

 

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ARTICLES FROM SMALL BUSINESS EXPERT CAROL ROTH

 

Don’t lead with an ask: Do not ask for something in your first few interactions. Building a relationship takes time and if you truly need assistance, insight or even some swag, influencers will be much more inclined to do so if you have done something for them first or at least built up a relationship.

 

Do be helpful: Offering your help and advice for a cause or endeavor important to an influencer is a good way to earn brownie points. If you comment on their blog, share their tweets, buy their book and send them a note about it or find other ways to be helpful, it can be a great way to build up trust with the influencer. But do it authentically. It’s obvious when someone sends an email saying they love your blog but clear they aren’t an avid reader. That’s an immediate turn-off for influencers.

 

Do be genuine and engaging: It’s clear when you are being yourself and clear when you are being a phony, even in 140 characters. Authenticity goes a long way, as noted above. Being funny doesn’t hurt either, but only if you have a good handle on the other person’s sense of humor – not everything translates clearly in writing.

 

Do talk about the influencer’s favorite topic – them: Everyone is open to flattery, although I advise that you don’t go overboard or you will look like a kiss-ass and/or a moron. Share what you admire about the other person’s work to start the conversation.

 

RELATED ARTICLE: THE 4 C’S OF SOCIAL MEDIA TO GROW BUSINESS (VIDEO)

 

Don’t be rude, offensive or defensive: Sometimes, people get their undies in a bunch if they don’t get the type of response they are hoping for when they reach out to an influencer. Building a relationship takes time, so be patient and influencers, almost by definition, are busy. If you act entitled, your targeted influencer will never engage with you. Being pushy isn’t a recommended method for making friends either.

 

Do be patient: As noted, influencers are busy, so it may take weeks or longer for them to respond. If you build a relationship and you have an “ask” that may take a long time to get completed, plan accordingly.

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Don’t make it difficult: If you want an influencer you connect with to do something for you, like be quoted in your article, invest in your business or write a foreword for your book, make it as easy as possible to say yes. This means don’t have them jump through hoops, click links or do something your way; do everything you can to make the process painless and seamless.

 

Do help them make money: If you have a referral for their business, that’s a great way to start or further a relationship. But make it legitimate, which means “getting in on the ground floor of your investment opportunity” does not count.

 

Do know the line between persistence and annoyance: There is a difference between being helpful and being a pest.  Always leave them wanting more. Also, remember that everyone needs to get some work done too, no matter how interesting you think you may be.

 

Don’t cross the line or be creepy, even as a joke: Seeking stimulating conversation is one thing. If you are looking for something else to be stimulated, look elsewhere. Remember trust isn’t implicit; it is earned. When the other person doesn’t know you from Adam (and yes, even if you are both on a social media platform, they don’t really know you), the creepy radar will be on high. Don’t make jokes that make you sound like a serial killer. You don’t want to end up on their list of people whose houses the police should check under if they go missing.

 


 

About Carol Roth

Carol Roth is the creator of the Future File™ legacy planning system, “recovering” investment banker, billion-dollar dealmaker, investor, entrepreneur, national media personality and author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Entrepreneur Equation. She is a judge on the Mark Burnett-produced technology competition show, America’s Greatest Makers and TV host and contributor, including host of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy. She is also an advisor to companies ranging from startups to major multi-national corporations and has an action figure made in her own likeness. 

 

Web: www.CarolRoth.com or Twitter: @CarolJSRoth.

You can read more articles from Carol Roth by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Carol Roth to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Carol Roth is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Carol Roth. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Social media can be a great, cost-effective way to reach customers – but only if your posts are seen. Small Business Expert Carol Roth says small businesses can run successful social media programs if they follow the 4 C’s – Consuming Content, Creating Content, Curating Content and Communication. Watch the video as Carol explains how these C’s work together to create a compelling social media program to grow your small business faster.

 

 

 

About Carol Roth

Carol Roth is the creator of the Future File™ legacy planning system, “recovering” investment banker, billion-dollar dealmaker, investor, entrepreneur, national media personality and author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Entrepreneur Equation. She is a judge on the Mark Burnett-produced technology competition show, America’s Greatest Makers and TV host and contributor, including host of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy. She is also an advisor to companies ranging from startups to major multi-national corporations and has an action figure made in her own likeness.

 

Web: www.CarolRoth.com or Twitter: @CarolJSRoth.

You can read more articles from Carol Roth by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Carol Roth to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Carol Roth is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Carol Roth. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

                

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Whether on Facebook, Twitter or your favorite site, have you ever found yourself in the middle of an article that was something along the lines of “7 Ways Your Business is Like a Rescue Dog” and then thought to yourself, “Why am I reading this?” 

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Well, it turns out that there’s actually some science behind why you find yourself tumbling down the Internet content rabbit-hole. In fact, there are certain tricks and formats for creating and packaging content that are widely used by the media as “clickbait”—aka, a method to get you to fill that knowledge gap by clicking on the content.

 

Because content is critical for small businesses from brand awareness to search engine rankings, you need to know the best way to get people to read and share the content you created. Here are 7 tricks to help you package the content you create so that you can get more people to read and share it.

 

1. Listicles

 

A listicle is an article format made up of a list of tips. Just as I did with the title to this article, putting things into compelling lists is a great way to get clicks and shares. Creating your content within the context of “Top 5 Ways” or “10 Tips” is a great, easy method for readers to consume content. 

 

2. Photos

 

Back before languages were developed, people used hieroglyphics for communication. Then, languages were developed. Now, we are back to emojis. This cycle is due to our short attention spans and the desire to consume content visually. Add photos to your tweets and articles. Use platforms that encourage photo sharing, like Instagram. The more that you can engage with visuals, the more likely you are to get engagement, as statistics show that these postings are shared exponentially more often on average that those with no photos.  

 

Click here to read more articles from small business expert Carol Roth

 

3. Bust myths

 

Busting a myth is always a great way to get someone’s attention. Curiosity naturally makes you want to know what it is that you don’t know. Think about an angle like, “5 Myths on Why Technology is Expensive for SMBs.” Just make sure that if you are using this format, you are actually dispelling a widely held belief or it won’t work.

 

4. Challenge the norm

 

One of the most successful ways to package content is to challenge a common perspective that’s widely held. I got a lot of click-through and social sharing on convention-busting articles like “Why Smart People Make Bad Entrepreneurs” and “Why Shark Tank’s ‘Mr. Wonderful’ Thinks Women Make Better CEOs”.  The second got double duty, given that not only was the women CEO angle a challenge of common thinking, but you also wouldn’t have expected that would have been Kevin O’Leary’s take, either!


5. Compare groups

 

Humans are competitive and we like to see that competition manifested between groups with some semblance of a rivalry. Compare women vs. men, small business vs. big business, millennials vs. boomers or make similar comparisons. An example would be, “Why Women Embrace Technology More Quickly Than Men.”

 

Related article: Selling to Millennials: 5 Tips to Market with Authenticity     

     

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6. Quote influencers

 

One of the best ways to get a ton of social shares on content is to have someone (or many someones) with a big following share the content. So, how do you get someone influential to share your content?  Include or quote them! That makes them more willing to share with their audience, exposing your business and your content to their audience.

 

7. Celebrity/pop culture

 

Love it or hate it, tying into hot celebrities, TV shows, movies and the like can be a great way to attract attention. For example, I used, “From Oprah to the Kardashians: 6 Celebrity-Inspired Business Lessons” as a way to package up good entrepreneurial learnings.

 

While it’s important that your content is worthwhile and strong, right packaging will help it become read and shared. Using the above tricks can help you package up your great articles and tweets in a way that makes them even more compelling.

 

About Carol Roth

Carol Roth is the creator of the Future File™ legacy planning system, “recovering” investment banker, billion-dollar dealmaker, investor, entrepreneur, national media personality and author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Entrepreneur Equation. She is a judge on the Mark Burnett-produced technology competition show, America’s Greatest Makers and TV host and contributor, including host of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy. She is also an advisor to companies ranging from startups to major multi-national corporations and has an action figure made in her own likeness. 

 

Web: www.CarolRoth.com or Twitter: @CarolJSRoth.

You can read more articles from Carol Roth by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Carol Roth to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Carol Roth is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Carol Roth. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

                 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Viral used to be something you didn’t want any part of, but for small businesses using social media, “going viral” is a constant objective. While social media can be a great, cost-effective way to reach customers, it can be a challenge for small businesses to cut through the noise and have their posts seen.

 

Here are 7 best practices to ensure your social content is working for you.

 

1.     Post consistently

 

The best chance to have social content that works is to make sure you consistently post on your platforms of choice. A few times a month won’t cut it. The best frequency varies by platform. For LinkedIn, you may want to be posting just one or two times a day, max. But for Twitter, a “tweet’s” life is often only an hour or less, so you may want to post 4-8 times per day (sometimes, even sending the same or a similar tweet within the same day or week).

 

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Also, it’s better to be on one or two platforms consistently than being inconsistent across a bunch of platforms.

 

2.     Add pictures and videos

 

People have short – and shrinking – attention spans. So capturing attention often boils down to being visual. Think about it; Emojis have replaced words in communications!  Take a cue from that and add photos and videos to your social content.

 

Statistics show that adding visual content will boost engagement. If you have a product to show off, this is a no brainer. If you are service-oriented, trying using a photo with some words over it or a complementary photo to your text as a way to engage current and potential customers.

 

Also, explore visually-oriented platforms like Instagram and Pinterest.

 

Click here to read more articles from small business expert Carol Roth

 

3.     Try different verbiage and times

 

Mix up the language you use on social media. You may find being clever resonates or perhaps your customers like a more straightforward approach. Social media provides an easy and cheap platform for testing, so pay attention to what works.

 

Also, mix up the timing of your posts. You may find on certain platforms, certain times of day do better or worse. For me, mornings and evenings are great on Twitter, but there’s a dead zone mid-afternoon. Keep testing!

 

4.     Engage an influencer

 

A great way to make content go viral is to have someone with a big following share the content. People with big audiences are busy (and like to have a benefit for leveraging the audiences that they have built), so spamming them doesn’t work well. Instead, include them in your content. Or, go through a service that will allow you to pay an influencer to post for you (with proper legal disclosure).

 

Related article: 5 Ways to Use Social Media to Better Run Your Business

 

5.     Pay

 

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Speaking of payment, targeted boosting of content can really create a great return on investment. Facebook and YouTube are two platforms where targeting is strong and returns tend to be more tangible. Again, you can stretch a small budget and test to find out what works as an added bonus.

 

6.     Be helpful

 

Nobody likes to be hit over the head with advertisements over and over again, so while it’s ok to throw out an offer from time to time, include other helpful content as well as fun content that aligns with your brand. For example, if you sell gardening tools, post content (either created by you or that you found elsewhere) on the five best ways to make your vegetables grow bigger and faster, or something like that. Or share photos of vegetables that look like animals (who wouldn’t want to share that?)! It will help you attract more loyalty and a bigger audience that will be receptive when you do have an offer to make.

 

7.     Hop on a trend

 

If there is a hot trend happening, whether a holiday or an actual social trend (like Twitter’s trending topics), adding relevant content and hashtags related to that trend can help build new followers and customers find you and share your content.

 

About Carol Roth: Carol Roth is the creator of the Future File™ legacy planning system, “recovering” investment banker, billion-dollar dealmaker, investor, entrepreneur, national media personality and author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Entrepreneur Equation. She is a judge on the Mark Burnett-produced technology competition show, America’s Greatest Makers and TV host and contributor, including host of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy. She is also an advisor to companies ranging from startups to major multi-national corporations and has an action figure made in her own likeness. 

 

Web: www.CarolRoth.com or Twitter: @CarolJSRoth

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Carol Roth to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Carol Roth is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Carol Roth. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.


Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

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