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2019

Just when you’ve got a handle on marketing to millennials, it’s time to target a new demographic: Generation Z. Variously defined as born after 1996 or after 2000, by 2020, Generation Z will account for one-third of the U.S. population and almost 40% of U.S. consumers.

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While many millennials have early childhood memories of the analog age, Gen Z is the first generation to grow up in a totally digital world. What must you know to market to them?

 

Living life online: 45% of teens are online “almost constantly” and 44% are online multiple times a day, says Pew Research Institute. The most popular platform is YouTube (85% use it), followed by Instagram (72%) and Snapchat (69%). Tap into Gen Z’s passion for video with how-to, behind-the-scenes, or product videos.

 

Social selves: Gen Z consumers use social media to crowdsource information about products and get opinions from friends. However, they use the various social channels in different ways, according to Response Media: Instagram is for showing off their “aspirational selves,” Snapchat is for sharing “real-life moments,” and Twitter is where they get news.

 

Attention, please: 30%of Gen Z users abandon content after 5 seconds if it doesn’t deliver something of interest or value. This generation is constantly filtering a barrage of information. Get their attention with“snackable” information using visuals (memes, emojis, GIFs and videos) as the main focus and text as supporting information.

 

Under the influence: You don’t need to pay thousands of dollars for a celebrity influencer. Generation Z prefers “nano-influencers” (small-scale influencers with just a few thousand deeply engaged followers). Get new products into influencers’ hands and involve them in your marketing and events. Use tools like Audiense and SocialBook to find nano-influencers, or turn a passionate Gen Z customer into a nano-influencer for your brand.

 

Relationship goals: Engage with Generation Z on their level. Don’t talk down to them or at them. Use social media to ask questions, listen, learn more about them and become part of their world. So Gen Z can see what their peers think about your products, make user-generated content part of your social media presence. Get customers to post photos of themselves wearing or using your products. Ask for input about new products, brands to sell, or promotional ideas.

Honesty is the best policy: While millennials post carefully curated Instagram shots of their perfect avocado toast, Gen Zers are more likely to portray themselves realistically, flaws and all, on social media. They want you to be honest, too. Tell the story of your business and share yourself and your employees as the face of your business to create a personal relationship.

 

All are welcome here: The most ethnically diverse generation ever (according to Pew, nearly half are racial or ethnic minorities), Gen Z is also more fluid and accepting regarding gender and sexuality (35% know someone who uses gender-neutral pronouns). Show a wide range of people in your marketing messages, make sure your marketing is inclusive, and make all customers feel welcome in your space.

 

Traditional values: Growing up in the Great Recession, Gen Zers have a conservative attitude toward money that’s reflected in their passion for deals. The number-one reason they sign up for marketing messages is to get discounts and offers (and yes, they actually open their emails.) Provide value so they can feel their hard-earned money is being well spent.

 

Make it simple: Your digital marketing and sales strategy must be mobile first since that’s where Generation Z is most likely to engage. Make sure your marketing messages, offers, and customer experience are consistent across all your digital channels. Gen Z should be able to do anything, from browsing your products to placing an order, on a smartphone with one hand.

 

Read next:

6 Ways to Turn Millennials into Repeat Customers

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

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Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2018 Bank of America Corporation

In my last post focused on e-commerce, I talked about how local businesses are feeling the squeeze from giant online sellers. I explained that by offering personalized, in-store, local services, small businesses can make themselves a neighborhood institution in the same way Apple Stores do through informational events and services.

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It’s a huge advantage. Online businesses “know” their customers through the data they leave behind. Local businesses actually knowtheir customers.

 

The challenge that remains is marketing. Online businesses dominate search engine results, know exactly how to find people interested in their products on the Web, and have tactics in place to bring them to an effective landing page.

 

Offline, things are a bit more complicated. Local newspapers aren’t what they used to be. Local cable advertising lacks impact (and viewers) in the days of YouTube and Netflix. And as for direct marketing… well, spam folders weren’t the first places to store unsolicited pitches. There were trash cans long before email filters.

 

But there are some good solutions… and ironically, they’re online. Craigslistmight have killed off the classified pages in newspapers but it’s delivered an effective replacement. Amazon’s web traffic reporting platform ranks the site the 19th most popular in the U.S., with tens of millions of people each month browsing for used furniture, apartments and jobs, but also for wedding photographers, cars and computer repairs.

 

The site is highly competitive. Users expect prices to be low, and in busy areas in particular, ads are quickly pushed down the site. That means local businesses should use Craigslist to promote select items, tell people that they can find more in the store, and keep pushing new product or service listings onto the site on a regular basis to stay visible.

 

It takes effort but there’s a reason that classified advertising stayed so popular for so long. It works.

 

Next up: Facebook

 

The other effective online solution for local businesses is Facebook.

 

The social media platform might be better known for promoting online businesses, but it can also be highly effective for local offline businesses too. It happens in two ways.

The first is simply to advertise. Because Facebook lets businesses select the geographic location of potential customers, a local store can choose to only show its ads to people within a short drive of the shop. Wedding photographers, for example, have been known to advertise to engaged women in a radius of up to 50 miles. They reach exactly their target market.

 

That’s simple—and expensive—enough. Another route though is to join local Facebook groups. Local neighborhood committees often set up private members’ groups to keep people informed of events and news that affect everyone. People might talk about parking problems or lost pets, as well as garage sales and local services.

You do have to be careful here. These groups are set up for locals to talk to each other, not for businesses to pitch to customers but the organizers will often set aside one day a week on which businesses are allowed to advertise for free.

 

Obey the rules and make sure you’re only offering services that will benefit locals. If you’re a Realtor, for example, only promote properties in the neighborhood that serves that group. And be a good citizen of the group. Join in the discussions and give professional advice when you can.

 

The Internet has been difficult for local commerce. It’s pulled business away from bricks and mortar stores to sites like Amazon. But it can also be a route for local businesses to find local customers.

 

Learn more about connecting with local customers and watch stories of Atlanta and Nashville small businesses.

 

 

About Joel Comm

 

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As an Internet pioneer, Joel has been creating profitable websites, software, products and helping entrepreneurs succeed since 1995. He has been at the frontlines of live video online since 2008 and has a deep expertise in using tools such as Facebook Live, Periscope, Instagram or Snapchat to broadcast a clearly defined message to a receptive audience or leveraging the power of webinar and meeting technologies.

 

Joel is a New York Times best-selling author of 15 books, including “The AdSense Code,” “Click Here to Order: Stories from the World’s Most Successful Entrepreneurs,” “KaChing: How to Run an Online Business that Pays and Pays and Twitter Power 3.0.” He is Co-Host of The Bad Crypto Podcast one of the top crypto-related shows in the world and has spoken before thousands of people around the world and seeks to inspire, equip and entertain.

 

Web: https://joelcomm.com/ or Twitter: @JoelComm

Read more from Joel Comm

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Joel Comm to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Joel Comm is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Joel Comm. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

If I ask you if you’re using LinkedIn for your business, chances are you’ll make an awkward face. I can read your mind at this very moment: “Not really but I have a profile on there. Not sure why. Uh, market my small business?”

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I get it. You maybe haven’t heard much about whatto do on LinkedIn and I’m here to help. Here are some best practices for using LinkedIn for small business marketing.

 

Profile vs Group?

 

I’m asked whether companies should market on individual profile pages or create a special group instead. While some groups end up thriving, this requires a lot of maintenance. I don’t recommend groups unless whatever you sell really lends itself to a very active group-based interactive experience.

 

The challenge with marketing from only one profile is that it’s somewhat required that the profile you use be easily available to everyone who might want to contribute, and/or it changes the “feel” of the profile from being one person’s perspective to a corporate communications entity.

 

Instead, my recommendation is to have more than one LinkedIn profile of real people in the company post content and promote interactions in support of the company.

 

My old boss and friend Debbie Millin works at Globalization Partners, where she’s the COO. Her posts are a blend of personal business perspective (which is great because she’s the smartest boss I ever had), as well as pieces directly about the company including “We’re Hiring” reposts from the HR team and articles about the industry where her company interacts. There are several other individual profile pages from key team members at Debbie’s company and they all post their own content as well as share important company material.

 

 

What on Earth Should We Post?

 

Smile! First, I have to say it (and you’re reading it everywhere and trying to ignore it): video is hot. People are watching videos and posting a video is a surefire way to earn more engagement, even if the video is only the quality level of you holding your smartphone at arm’s length and talking into the camera. Video.

 

Give them knowledge. Second, thoughtful articles written on LinkedIn tend to do well if the topic is universal enough. Unless you have raving fans, no one cares about “Wanda’s Top 7 favorite pencil sharpeners.” But if you write about “The Ultimate School Supply Checklist for Fall,” you’re on to something. The more “evergreen” the article, the better. (Meaning it’s okay to write topically about current events, but it’s delightful to write posts that can still be useful a year or two later.)

 

Links are In. Post a few links here and there to articles you find interesting. People like to know what else is on your mind.

 

Shine the light. Here’s an easy and well-appreciated marketing tip: post thoughtful recommendations for other businesses and people in your local community. Maybe you sell tile and bath supplies. Do your “plumber of the month” or “interior designer of the month” profile. Write enough to praise the other person and promote their business without talking much about your company. People love the heck out of this. 

 

Share Educational Webinars. Invite people to a live webinar and/or take advantage of LinkedIn’s ownership of Lynda.com and Slideshare to create interactive learning products. That sounds fancy, but give people something they can do, step by step, using your product and post it on your profile.

 

Invite People to Live Events. Post invites to events in your offices or local community appearances. Tastings. Whatever you can manage. There’s nothing like a face-to-face engagement to make the digital world look even better.

 

Okay, so how often should you post?

 

A Simple LinkedIn Posting Calendar

 

You can edit this to match the needs of your business, but here’s my recommendation:

 

    • Post links to other people’s articles daily
    • Post a video once a week minimum. Better if you can post 3 videos a week
    • Post an article monthly (or more if you can muster it)
    • Do a profile of someone else monthly (unless you can manage weekly)
    • Share event invites whenever it makes sense. You can post reminders to the event 2 to 3 times as well
    • Avoid Monday morning posts - worst time ever
    • Avoid Friday afternoon posts - tied for the worst time ever
    • If you sell to a very specific time zone, 11am and 2pm are my magical posting times for businesses. Earlier and later for self-owned and customer experiences

 

Content Guidelines to Follow

 

The videos you post should be brief – no more than 12 minutes, no fewer than 2.

 

The articles you post can be brief or longer (200 words up to 1500 words).

 

With links, write about 30 words explaining why you’re sharing it or what to look for.

 

And with profiles, make them between 200 to 500 words with ample links to the person you’re writing about and any relevant links to their materials.

 

Add a call to action where it makes sense. Realize that if someone sees this content in their stream and they like it, they will click your LinkedIn profile icon to take a next step.

 

That’s my advice. Tailor content to fit your business, but don’t skimp on the parts you feel weird about. They’re maybe new to you but it doesn’t mean they’re not what people want.

 

Give it a try. What do you have to lose?

 

 

About Chris Brogan

 

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Chris Brogan is an author, keynote speaker and business advisor who helps companies update organizational interfaces to better support modern humans. The age of factory-sized interactions is over. We all come one to a pack. And it’s time to accept that we are all a little bit dented. Chris advisesleadership teams to empower team members by sharing actionable insights on talent development. He also works with marketing and communications teams to more effectively reach people who want to be seen and understood before they buy what a company sells.

 

Web: https://chrisbrogan.com Twitter: @ChrisBrogan

Read more from Chris Brogan

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Chris Brogan to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. The third parties within articles are used under license from Chris Brogan. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

How can a brick-and-mortar retailer convince e-commerce shoppers to get off their couches and into the store?

 

Even if you sell online as well as in-store, there are compelling reasons for cultivating in-store shoppers. Some 71 percent of shoppers spend $50 or more when visiting a brick-and-mortar store; just 54 percent do so when shopping online.

 

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And shoppers in physical stores buy more than the original item they intended to buy 75 percent of the time. In other words, in-store shoppers are highly profitable.

 

Getting e-commerce shoppers in your door is easier than you may think. Even though they make some purchases online, nearly 80 percent of consumers still shop primarily in brick-and-mortar stores. All they need is a little nudge.

 

Here’s how to deliver these customers to your store.

 

Use email and text message marketing. Direct messaging can be very effective at driving customers to a physical store. According to a report by Sailthru, 22 percent of consumers aged 35 to 44 have redeemed an emailed discount in a physical store; almost 40 percent of 18- t024-years-olds have visited a store to buy something promoted via push notification. Use data from customers’ past purchases to craft targeted messages and offers to entice them to your door.

 

Boost your presence online. Optimize your website for local search by ensuring your store’s listings in local search directories are up-to-date and complete. They should include your name, address, hours, phone number, images of your store and a link to your website; the description of your store should include relevant keywords. Since Google has become the primary place consumers look for reviews, encourage your customers to review your store on Google so people see a positive rating when your site pops up on Google.

 

Stay active on social media. A strong social media presence will boost awareness of your physical store. Use paid social media advertising to target shoppers who fit your customer profile and live near your store. You can also work with local social media influencers to publicize your store by inviting them to events or involving them in promotions.

 

Use your website to promote your store. Even if you sell products online, use your website to drive traffic to your brick-and-mortar store. Include photos of your store interior and displays, along with your address and a map, so people realize there’s a physical location to visit. Highlight the benefits of visiting your store, such as being able to test products or attend live events. You could even spotlight your newest products on your website but offer them for sale only in-store for the first week.

 

Hold offline-only promotions. Create different discounts and offers for your online and offline shoppers. For example, you could give shoppers who order online a code for a discount that’s good only in-store. Hold a flash sale in-store only or offer free gifts with purchase only to shoppers at your store.

 

Connect the online and in-store purchasing process. For example, offer the option to order products online and pick them up in store, and allow shoppers to return online purchases at your store. In both situations, shoppers typically do more than just pick up or return a product—they’ll browse and spend some extra money, too.

 

Use Google Shopping Ads. Since 87 percent of shoppers start their search for products online, grabbing their attention online can get them in your door. If a shopper sees you have the shoes they want in the size they want, they’re likely to buy from you rather than wait for online delivery: 73 percent of people who visit a physical store do so to get a product right away.  You can use Google AdWords campaigns to target people searching for products you sell or, even better, set up Google Shopping Ads to display a product photo, price, your store name and more. You’ll need a Google Merchant Center account and a Google AdWords account to get started. Learn more about Google Shopping Ads.

 

Driving e-commerce customers to your brick-and-mortar store strengthens your retail brand and gives you the best of both worlds.

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

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Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2018 Bank of America Corporation

Influencer marketing has evolved rapidly over the last few years. In fact, influencer marketing has become such a key growth strategy for businesses that the industry is estimated to reach up to $10 billion by 2020.

 

For a long time, influencer marketing was mostly associated with big brands and celebrities. The landscape is changing and, as individuals invest in building niche communities on platforms like Instagram, Facebook and YouTube, businesses are beginning to recognize their value.

 

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We are now seeing a new wave of micro-influencers leading the way, not only for the big brands but for small businesses looking to capitalize on the trend. 2019 Statistics show that 81% of all influencers are micro-influencers.

 

This has created a level playing field for small businesses with an opportunity to drive sales even in a local market.

 

In this article, I’m going to show you how you and your business can get started with micro-influencer marketing.

 

What Is A Micro-Influencer?

 

Just as it sounds, a micro influencer is a person that may not have the largest following on social media but the following they do have is highly engaged. This person has a lot of influence among their community and, as a result, that community is highly likely to listen and act when a value proposition is presented to them.

 

Eighty one percent of micro-influencers have between 15k and 100k followers but don’t let this deter you from partnering with audience sizes as little as 5000 followers.  A report by Gartner L2 showed there is actually an inverse correlation between the number of followers and the engagement rate in Instagram influencers.

 

This highlights a critical factor in the success of micro-influencer marketing. It’s not just about the size of an influencer’s audience, the quality of the audience is just as important.

 

What are the benefits of working with a Micro-Influencer?

 

It’s A Cost-Effective Marketing Strategy

 

One of the biggest challenges that businesses face is finding their target audience and earning their attention. To do this exclusively in-house can be costly and extremely time-consuming. It can take months, if not years, to build an engaged audience who buys into your messaging and your product offering.

 

Micro-influencers have already done all the work. You have instant access to a highly-engaged, targeted audience. That’s hugely valuable especially in a local market.

 

While some micro-influencers still accept product in exchange for their endorsement, most now require compensation for their work.

 

The cost of influencer marketing varies greatly based on a number of factors including the influencer’s social reach, the type of sponsored content and the length/ frequency of your arrangement.

 

A report by Later (2018) stated 66% of businesses paid under $250 per influencer post, while 27% paid between $250 and $1000 per post.

 

Influencer Marketing Hub created an Instagram Money Calculator to help calculate how much an influencer’s post is worth. Whilst this shouldn’t be used to define an influencer’s compensation plan, it can provide a generalized overview. For the most part, micro-influencers will have their own media kits and pricing structures in place.

 

As a general guide, you can expect to pay anywhere between $75 and $2000 per post depending on the value that micro-influencer brings.

 

With that in mind, micro-influencers can be far more cost-effective than if a business were to grow organically by themselves.

 

Social Proof leads to Sales

 

Sixty one percent of consumers aged 18 to 34 have, at some point, been swayed in their decision-making by digital influencers.

 

Micro-influencers have already earned trust among their community. That social proof carries a lot of value when it comes to the follower making a positive buying decision.

 

Fullscreen, a global leader in social-first entertainment and branded content, partnered with leading social analytics firm Shareablee, to analyze 31,000 influencers. In their report, they discovered 22% of 18-34 year-olds have made a large purchase after seeing an online influencer endorsing the item. With the right micro-influencer(s) working with you, this strategy has the potential to generate large returns on your investment.

 

Influencer Marketing is Scalable

 

Micro-influencers act like your own marketing and sales team combined. They have their own audiences and they know what works in terms of engaging and converting that audience into sales. Brand campaigns driven by micro-influencers are estimated to create 60% higher engagement rates.

 

Micro-influencers don’t require the management of an inhouse team and they already have a community of warm leads. Deploying effective marketing campaigns and consistently generating leads are two of the biggest challenges small business owners face, which makes micro-influencers a huge asset to small businesses especially on a local level.

 

Influencer marketing is scalable. While it requires a financial investment, the right micro-influencers will quickly generate a return and dramatically build your brand’s awareness and reputation.

 

How to Get Started Working with Micro-Influencers

 

Getting started with micro-influencers is simple but not always easy. Here is a basic checklist for you to follow:

 

      1. Create a strategic plan with clear objectives you want to achieve.
      2. Make a list of potential micro-influencers to start exploring.
      3. Reach out to start building a relationship. Make sure your approach is very win/win as the micro-influencer may receive numerous invitations to partner with brands on a regular basis.
      4. Invite the micro-influencer to consider collaborating with your business.
      5. Draw out a written plan with clear terms and conditions to protect both parties.
      6. Set a time period initially to establish success markers.

 

This sounds straightforward, but it does require a lot of work and there are a few best practices to follow.

 

 

Best Practices for Micro-Influencer Marketing

 

1. Find Relevant Influencers

 

It’s really important to keep your end goal in mind when it comes to finding influencers with whom you can partner. You’re not looking for just anyone, even if they have an engaged audience. It has to be the right demographics that fit your target audience.

 

Positioning is key. You are looking for local influencers who have a loyal following that matches your target market.

 

This way, when the influencer presents your business and call to action, you are going to see some traction and a profitable return on your investment.

 

The easiest way to find relevant influencers is to spend time researching the platform on which you and your audience is most active. Search locations, hashtags and mentions to find out where the conversations are happening. Once you find potential micro-influencers, monitor their profile and their interactions closely. Look for the quantity but more importantly the quality of engagement on each post.

 

By investing time up front, you will ensure that you find micro-influencers that are a good fit for your business. Not only will it save you time long-term, it can save you a lot of money working with people who aren’t a fit and perhaps don’t carry the influence you initially thought.

 

2. Ensure the Authenticity of Micro-Influencers

 

As influencer marketing has grown, so have the number of companies looking to capitalize on the trend. In 2018, the extent of influencer fraud was exposed as thousands of accounts were found to be buying likes, follows and engagement to appear as though they had gained influencer status.

 

Captive8 reported that of the $2.1bn spent on influencer-sponsored Instagram posts in 2017, more than 11% of engagement on those posts was generated from fraudulent accounts.

 

This is a big problem. While technology companies are working to combat this by launching AI-focused tools, influencer marketing fraud still remains a huge issue.

 

Ninety percent of Marketers believe proving authenticity is critical to the future of Influencer Marketer.

 

For you, as a reputable business, it’s imperative that you do your research and establish the validity of an influencer before jumping into a relationship with them.

 

Monitor their account, check the quality of their audience and their engagement. Look for sponsored posts and how the traction gained in quality likes and comments.

 

When reaching out, ask for case studies and past results that you can cross-check. Also ensure that the micro-influencer is following FTC Guidelines.

 

It’s important to keep in mind that micro-influencers want to ensure the authenticity of your brand and products. Influencers promote what they trust. Take time to share with them and provide samples when appropriate. Micro-influencers have earned a loyal audience and protecting that audience is their responsibility.

 

3. Measuring the ROI of Micro-Influencers

 

One of the biggest challenges for businesses investing in micro-influencers is measuring the return on investment. As a business owner, you want to know that your marketing strategy is working and delivering results.

 

Eighty five percent of marketers say engagement data is the biggest metric of success for influencer marketing. Forty six percent of marketers are using product sales to measure the success of influencer marketing.

 

Both are valid measures. These are three key areas you want to track:

 

        1. Engagement:cThis is typically measured in new followers, likes, comments, shares, mentions, and all other forms of engagement with your business as a result of working with a micro-influencer. The return here is in brand awareness and growth. You should see a spike in engagement each time the micro-influencer shares your brand. This is a simple way to visually see the impact your micro-influencer has.
        2. Content: This metric is made up of comments, shares and sentiment of the paid posts. It helps establish whether the content fits with the audience and the objective. This may be an indication to try a different type or style of content that may resonate better.
        3. Sales: You can track this by providing affiliate urls, influencer exclusive discount codes and monitoring google analytics so that you can measure the sales each micro-influencer has brought to your business.

 

If you’re a small business owner, micro-influencer marketing can offer a lot of value and certainly has the potential to drive big sales in your local market. It just takes the right research, the right influencer, and the right partnership.

 

About Mari Smith

 

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Often referred to as “the Queen of Facebook,” Mari Smith is considered one of the world’s foremost experts on Facebook marketing and social media. She is a Forbes’ Top Social Media Power Influencer, author of The New Relationship Marketing and coauthor of Facebook Marketing: An Hour A Day. Forbes recently described Mari as, “… the preeminent Facebook expert. Even Facebook asks for her help.” She is a recognized Facebook Partner; Facebook headhunted and hired Mari to lead the Boost Your Business series of live events across the US. Mari is an in-demand speaker, and travels the world to keynote and train at major events.

 

Her digital marketing agency provides professional speaking, training and consulting services on Facebook and Instagram marketing best practices for Fortune 500 companies, brands, SMBs and direct sales organizations. Mari is also an expert webinar and live video broadcast host, and she serves as Brand Ambassador for numerous leading global companies.

 

Web: Mari Smith  or Twitter: @MariSmith

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Mari Smith to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Mari Smith is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Mari Smith. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

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