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2017

Social media can be a great, cost-effective way to reach customers – but only if your posts are seen. Small Business Expert Carol Roth says small businesses can run successful social media programs if they follow the 4 C’s – Consuming Content, Creating Content, Curating Content and Communication. Watch the video as Carol explains how these C’s work together to create a compelling social media program to grow your small business faster.

 

 

 

About Carol Roth

Carol Roth is the creator of the Future File™ legacy planning system, “recovering” investment banker, billion-dollar dealmaker, investor, entrepreneur, national media personality and author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Entrepreneur Equation. She is a judge on the Mark Burnett-produced technology competition show, America’s Greatest Makers and TV host and contributor, including host of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy. She is also an advisor to companies ranging from startups to major multi-national corporations and has an action figure made in her own likeness.

 

Web: www.CarolRoth.com or Twitter: @CarolJSRoth.

You can read more articles from Carol Roth by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Carol Roth to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Carol Roth is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Carol Roth. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

                

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

With so many ways to reach out to your customers and prospects, from social media to direct mail to content marketing, you might think plain old email marketing is a thing of the past. Think again: Despite all the marketing options out there, email just might be your single, most effective choice.

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Here are three reasons why:

 

1. Email is customers’ preferred way to receive communications from businesses. According to Marketing Sherpa, 60 percent of consumers say email is their favorite way to receive updates and promotions from companies they’re interested in.

 

2. Email attracts new customers and helps retain existing ones. Email is 40 percent more effective at acquiring new customers than Facebook or Twitter. It also ranks as, by far, the most effective method for both acquiring and retaining customers, according to eMarketer.

 

3. Email drives sales. Most (69 percent) U.S. adults say a company’s email has influenced a purchase they’ve made, Marketing Sherpa reports.

 

Not only is email marketing highly effective, it’s also affordable for even the smallest businesses and easier than ever to implement. To maximize your email marketing results, try these tips.

 

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ARTICLES FROM SMALL BUSINESS EXPERT RIEVA LESONSKY

 

Segment your email lists.

You can slice and dice your lists based on any information you have about your customers—past interactions with your business, purchasing behavior, location, etc. Then send emails tailored to each segment. Marketers report that segmented email campaigns lead to a 760 percent increase in revenues (No, that’s not a typo).

 

Personalize emails.

Emails that use the recipient’s name are more likely to be opened. You can also create emails that reference customer details such as a previous purchase or items the customer has viewed on your website.

 

39764468_s.jpgTest, test and test again.

With email, it’s easy to see what’s working and what’s not. Do A/B testing of everything from your subject lines to your preview text to the color and size of buttons. Also test various frequencies for sending emails, including time of day and day of the week. Customers may want to hear from you more often than you think: 90 percent of respondents in a MarketingSherpa survey say they want to hear from businesses they’re interested in at least monthly, 60 percent want to hear from them at least weekly and 15 percent want to hear from them daily. For best results, give customers multiple options to choose from.

 

Optimize mobile devices.

Almost 90 percent of emails are read on mobile devices, and more emails are opened on mobile devices than on desktops, according to Kahuna. If recipients can’t read your emails on their smartphones, they’re going to delete them. Beyond making your emails readable on mobile devices, also make sure that any actions users take lead to a mobile-friendly landing page.

 

SIX TIPS TO GAIN NEW CUSTOMERS

 

Create email-specific landing pages.

Marketers report that this is the single most effective email marketing tactic, according to research published by the DMA.  If you can’t create a specific landing page for each individual email, at least make sure that links in your emails direct recipients to a page on your website that makes sense. For example, if you want someone to “Shop New Arrivals” on your e-commerce website, that button should go to the page with new products on it— not to the general homepage, where customers will feel lost.

 

Incorporate transactional emails.

These are emails that are triggered by some type of transaction between the recipient and your company. Welcome emails, order confirmation emails and return receipt emails are all examples of transactional emails. Transactional emails have eight times the open rate of marketing emails overall. Increase their value by including a call to action that drives additional customer interaction. For instance, a return receipt email could include a link to browse your website for new products to replace what was returned.

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com.  A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

           

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

By 2020, Generation Z - those born between 1998 and 2008, also known as “digital natives” - will make up 40 percent of consumers.

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Think about what that means: In just three years, 40 percent of all consumers will have lived nearly their entire lives using social media. 

 

If you want your brand to succeed among Gen Z, you’ve got to understand social media from this generation’s perspective. Here are 5 vital things you need to know about marketing to Gen Z:

 

1. Gen Zers almost universally use social media - but much more selectively than Millennials.

 

Many brands that are new to marketing to Gen Z will begin by blasting brand messages on every social network, because they assume that Gen Z lives on social media.

 

This is true in a sense; 74 percent of Gen Z spends between 1 to 3 hours per day on social media, but they’re also being highly selective about what they post, where they post, and who can see it. They’re masters at filtering out what they don’t want to be bothered with.

 

Click here to read more articles from small business expert Shama Hyder

 

2. Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook are the most popular networks among Gen Z.

 

Even though Facebook has a reputation for attracting users from Millennials, Gen X, and older generations, Gen Z still classifies it as their “most important” social network, according to creative agency Swift. It’s the one Gen Z is more likely to say they use constantly.

 

Instagram and Snapchat, however, are the platforms most used by the largest number of Gen Zers.

 

3. 63 percent of Gen Z wants to see “real people,” rather than celebrities, in marketing messaging.

 

For Gen Z, an endorsement of your product from an influencer or YouTube star will almost always be worth more than one by a traditional celebrity.

 

Related article: 7 Ways to Boost Engagement from Your Social Media Posts

 

In fact, a Deep Focus survey of Gen Zers found that 67 percent of respondents preferred non-celebrities in ads, versus 37 percent that did prefer celebrities.

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4. Gen Zers want useful or valuable content, not ads.

 

Gen Zers not only possess highly selective, fast-moving filters, but they’re also voracious consumers of content, and are just as likely to watch a full 25-minute video as they are to scroll past an ad.

 

This means you have a huge opportunity to connect with Gen Z via your content marketing. If you can create something of real value that truly reflects your brand values, you’ll likely find yourself with plenty of loyal Gen Z followers.

 

5. If you want to reach Gen Z, you have to gain their attention within 8 seconds.

 

Gen Z has an attention span about 4 seconds shorter than the average attention span in the year 2000, so your messaging must be concise, quick, and relevant. If they like what you’ve got to offer, they’ll stick with you. If not, you’ll become another brand that gets blocked, scrolled through, or filtered out.

 

Brands that want to succeed today and into the future can’t afford to ignore Gen Z. By embracing honesty, transparency, and authenticity, brands can begin to win over this important demographic.

 

About Shama Hyder

Shama Hyder is a visionary strategist for the digital age, a web and TV personality, a bestselling author, and the award-winning CEO of The Marketing Zen Group – a global online marketing and digital PR company. She has aptly been dubbed the “Zen Master of Marketing” by Entrepreneur Magazine and the “Millennial Master of the Universe” by FastCompany.com. Shama has also been honored at both the White House and The United Nations as one of the top 100 young entrepreneurs in the country. Shama has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the prestigious Technology Titan Emerging Company CEO award. She was named one of the “Top 25 Entrepreneurs under 25” by Business Week in 2009, one of the “Top 30 Under 30” Entrepreneurs in America in 2014 by Inc. Magazine, and to the Forbes “30 Under 30” list of movers and shakers for 2015. LinkedIn named Hyder one of its “Top Voices” in Marketing & Social Media. Her web show Shama TV was awarded the “Hermes Gold award for Educational Programming in Electronic Media” and most recently she was awarded the “Excellence in Social Media Entrepreneurship” award for 2016 by Anokhi Media.

 

Web: www.shamahyder.com or Twitter: @Shama.

You can read more articles from Shama Hyder by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Shama Hyder to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Shama Hyder is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Shama Hyder. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

           

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

You work hard to get new customers in the door—but what do you do to keep them there?

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Finding new customers is more difficult, expensive and time-consuming than keeping your existing ones happy. Plus, happy customers spend more. Boost your sales by trying these five tips to improve customer retention.

 

1. Market to your existing customers. When you see promotions from companies you do business with offering deals to new customers only, do you feel annoyed? You’re not alone. Marketing that focuses on new customers can make loyal customers feel snubbed. Create promotions and deals that benefit the customers who spend the most money with your business. For example, a B2B company can offer volume discounts; a retail company can offer “rewards,” such as $10 in-store spending money for every $50 spent within a certain period. The goal: Show your existing customers that the more they patronize your business, the greater the benefits.

 

2. Make post-sale follow-up part of your process. Whether you sell B2B or B2C, following up after the sale should be built into your operations.

  • A. If you sell B2B, you can use customer relationship management (CRM) software to track customers’ purchases, then set reminders to follow up at a certain point after the sale with a personalized email or phone call. It also allows you to answer any questions they may have about the product or service they purchased from you, and find out how it’s working for them. Reaching out not only shows them you care about building a lasting relationship, but also offers an opportunity to uncover complementary products or services that might add value to their business.
  • B. If you sell B2C, capture customers’ email addresses, then reach out soon after the sale to see if they have any questions or feedback about their purchase. Better yet, include a link they can use to write an online review of your business.

 

Click here to read more from small business expert Rieva Lesonsky

 

3. Listen to your customers.  The more you listen, the more you’ll understand what your current customers want and need, the better you can tailor your products and services to meet those needs, and the more customers you’ll retain. Encourage your salespeople to ask customers questions and share what they learn with the rest of the team. Conduct regular customer surveys to find out how your business is doing and what customers want that you’re not offering. Hold focus groups with loyal customers who represent key target markets for your business. Finally, listen to what your customers are saying on social media. Whether you engage them in a conversation or simply “lurk” and listen in, you’ll gain valuable insights into how you can serve them better.

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4. Create a VIP program. Treat your best customers like they’re VIPs—because they are! Consider instituting different levels of VIP programs, such as silver, gold and platinum. According to research cited by HelpScout, people will work to attain a higher level in the loyalty program when they know there are lower levels below. You can also host special events for your best customers, such as a “Customer of the Year” luncheon for a B2B company or a private, invitation-only sale for a B2C company.

 

Related article: How to Adjust Your Business to the Gig Economy

 

5. Provide outstanding customer service. No matter how many carrots you dangle in front of them, customers won’t remain loyal to your business if your service isn’t up to par. In fact, it’s got to be better than “up to par.” With so many alternatives available at the click of a mouse, both B2B and B2C customers have higher standards than ever for customer service. Convenience, rapid resolution of problems and knowledgeable salespeople are key factors in customer satisfaction. Conduct regular training in customer service standards, measure and monitor customer service performance, and reward employees who go above and beyond in providing customer service.

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com.  A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Whether on Facebook, Twitter or your favorite site, have you ever found yourself in the middle of an article that was something along the lines of “7 Ways Your Business is Like a Rescue Dog” and then thought to yourself, “Why am I reading this?” 

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Well, it turns out that there’s actually some science behind why you find yourself tumbling down the Internet content rabbit-hole. In fact, there are certain tricks and formats for creating and packaging content that are widely used by the media as “clickbait”—aka, a method to get you to fill that knowledge gap by clicking on the content.

 

Because content is critical for small businesses from brand awareness to search engine rankings, you need to know the best way to get people to read and share the content you created. Here are 7 tricks to help you package the content you create so that you can get more people to read and share it.

 

1. Listicles

 

A listicle is an article format made up of a list of tips. Just as I did with the title to this article, putting things into compelling lists is a great way to get clicks and shares. Creating your content within the context of “Top 5 Ways” or “10 Tips” is a great, easy method for readers to consume content. 

 

2. Photos

 

Back before languages were developed, people used hieroglyphics for communication. Then, languages were developed. Now, we are back to emojis. This cycle is due to our short attention spans and the desire to consume content visually. Add photos to your tweets and articles. Use platforms that encourage photo sharing, like Instagram. The more that you can engage with visuals, the more likely you are to get engagement, as statistics show that these postings are shared exponentially more often on average that those with no photos.  

 

Click here to read more articles from small business expert Carol Roth

 

3. Bust myths

 

Busting a myth is always a great way to get someone’s attention. Curiosity naturally makes you want to know what it is that you don’t know. Think about an angle like, “5 Myths on Why Technology is Expensive for SMBs.” Just make sure that if you are using this format, you are actually dispelling a widely held belief or it won’t work.

 

4. Challenge the norm

 

One of the most successful ways to package content is to challenge a common perspective that’s widely held. I got a lot of click-through and social sharing on convention-busting articles like “Why Smart People Make Bad Entrepreneurs” and “Why Shark Tank’s ‘Mr. Wonderful’ Thinks Women Make Better CEOs”.  The second got double duty, given that not only was the women CEO angle a challenge of common thinking, but you also wouldn’t have expected that would have been Kevin O’Leary’s take, either!


5. Compare groups

 

Humans are competitive and we like to see that competition manifested between groups with some semblance of a rivalry. Compare women vs. men, small business vs. big business, millennials vs. boomers or make similar comparisons. An example would be, “Why Women Embrace Technology More Quickly Than Men.”

 

Related article: Selling to Millennials: 5 Tips to Market with Authenticity     

     

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6. Quote influencers

 

One of the best ways to get a ton of social shares on content is to have someone (or many someones) with a big following share the content. So, how do you get someone influential to share your content?  Include or quote them! That makes them more willing to share with their audience, exposing your business and your content to their audience.

 

7. Celebrity/pop culture

 

Love it or hate it, tying into hot celebrities, TV shows, movies and the like can be a great way to attract attention. For example, I used, “From Oprah to the Kardashians: 6 Celebrity-Inspired Business Lessons” as a way to package up good entrepreneurial learnings.

 

While it’s important that your content is worthwhile and strong, right packaging will help it become read and shared. Using the above tricks can help you package up your great articles and tweets in a way that makes them even more compelling.

 

About Carol Roth

Carol Roth is the creator of the Future File™ legacy planning system, “recovering” investment banker, billion-dollar dealmaker, investor, entrepreneur, national media personality and author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Entrepreneur Equation. She is a judge on the Mark Burnett-produced technology competition show, America’s Greatest Makers and TV host and contributor, including host of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy. She is also an advisor to companies ranging from startups to major multi-national corporations and has an action figure made in her own likeness. 

 

Web: www.CarolRoth.com or Twitter: @CarolJSRoth.

You can read more articles from Carol Roth by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Carol Roth to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Carol Roth is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Carol Roth. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

                 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Have you ever watched the show Shark Tank? I love the ABC show for a few reasons: it helps me understand how smart investors analyze businesses, entrepreneurs and ideas.

 

Conversely, nothing gets me more upset on that show than when I see people who have put a ton of time, money, energy and effort into developing a product or business that is a good idea to them … but no one else. If you’ve seen the show, then you know what I am talking about – that entrepreneur who is crazy enthusiastic about an idea that solves a problem they had, but no one else ever encountered or worried about. They leave the show without any offers of money, and tell the camera that they are going to prove those shortsighted sharks wrong.

 

Example: The Wake ‘n Bacon – a wooden prototype alarm clock that wakes you to the smell of bacon. Fun idea, but probably not worth anything more than a second thought. Too bad the inventor didn’t vet his idea with others first who may have given him some valuable feedback that would have saved him a lot of time and money.

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Click here to read more articles from small business expert Steve Strauss

 

The secret to avoiding this fate is simple: Before you start, you need to discover whether or not there is a market for what you want to sell. Is it something people actually want to buy? There are two steps to figure this out:

 

1. Find a need and solve it: There is an old saying out there, “do what you love and the money will follow.” While noble and inspiring, it is also not always true. What if loved 18th century Flemish furniture? Outside of a stint on Antiques Roadshow, there probably are not a lot of ways that you could follow this passion and make a living.

 

Do what you love and the money won’t always follow.

 

The trick is to find something you are excited about (though maybe not necessarily “passionate” about) and figure out whether there are people out there who want or need what you want to sell. Is there a market for it? If so, what will they pay for it? Why would they choose you? If there is no one around who wants your proposed product or service, your business will fail. So, before you decide on a business, before you choose a name or get a business license, before you tap your 401(k) or credit cards, do your research and see if there is a market for your proposed solution.

 

Related article: Six Tips to Gain New Customers

 

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2. Do your homework: Is there a market need for a coffee house in your neighborhood? Why would people choose you over Starbucks? What can you offer that they do not? Market research will tell you.

 

What you need to do is, without emotion, analyze your idea and solution. There are several ways to get the feedback you need:

 

  • Form a focus group: Gather your friends, family and colleagues – people whose opinion you trust – and run your idea past them. Do they like it? Would they personally patronize your proposed business?
  • Ask online: If you have a website, poll visitors. LinkedIn also allows people to post polls. Get some feedback. Twitter is also a good tool for this.
  • Check in with trade associations: Almost every business and industry has a related trade group associated with it and these organizations typically have a lot of helpful research and data.
  • Check in with the competition: Contact a business owner in a neighboring city who is in the same business. Because you are not in the same locale, he or she will be far more likely to give you some honest feedback.
  • Surf: The web of course is a treasure trove of information.

 

The important thing is to make sure that you brainstorm, so that when people hear about it, they are wont to say, “I like it, and for that reason, I’m in!”

 

About Steve Strauss

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss.

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

                 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

By 2020, Millennials are going to make up a majority of the workforce. They’re already the largest living generation, and the back end of the generation is still in college. That means the buying power of Millennials is only going to increase, but unfortunately, many businesses aren’t properly marketing their goods and services to Millennials. That has to change if businesses want to attract and retain Millennials as customers. But what do they need to focus on?

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1.     Create Useful Content

Millennials are the most educated generation to date, and 34 percent of them have at least a bachelor’s degree. One thing they don’t want to see when they search for a product or brand is content that doesn’t serve a purpose. Articles and blogs that merely drive at a point without providing any real, useful information just looks like advertising to them, and thus they are less likely to trust that brand. A how-to guide, a YouTube tutorial, or even thorough explanations of commonly asked questions are all preferable to content that’s full of fluff.

2.     Tell An Authentic Story

But content doesn’t just have to be utilitarian, it can also tell your story. In fact, Millennials are usually very interested in the backstories and missions of their favorite brands. If your content is interesting and exciting, it does a much better job of attracting and retaining Millennial shoppers than a casual advertisement. Millennials are extremely receptive to authenticity and genuineness. 

Related article: Marketing to Millennials

3.     Promote Your Cause

This ties into the idea of telling an authentic story. Millennials are a socially conscious generation, and they like to promote and support causes dear to them. You’re more likely to gain and retain Millennial customers if you can articulate your mission and provide them with a way to feel good about the purchase they’ve just made. Patagonia is an example of a brand that connects with Millennials because of an authentic image backed up by environmentally and socially conscious decisions. Your small business probably can’t afford to give away the profits of your entire Black Friday sale, but it’s the type of approach to keep in mind as you develop marketing efforts.

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4.     Push The Experience

Another interesting fact about Millennials is that they consistently rate experiences as more important than possessions. That doesn’t mean they’re forsaking all their possessions and moving to the desert, but it does mean it’s important your marketing efforts tout the experience your brand provides. This is the culmination of creating compelling, authentic content. 

5.     Think Mobile

Whether it’s an app or just a fast, easily navigable website, you need to have a mobile resource for your Millennial customers. Many Millennials shop on their phones, but there’s more to it than that. The vast majority also use their phones to comparison shop when they’re in a physical store, or before they make a purchase online. Smartphones are ubiquitous among Millennials at this point, and any business targeting them not considering mobile engagement is missing out on a huge opportunity.

Related article: Six Tips to Gain New Customers

Millennials are constantly being praised, reviled, and analyzed in the public eye, in part because of their growing buying power. If you want to tap into that potential, then it’s time to focus your marketing efforts on what really works.

About Shama Hyder

Shama Hyder is a visionary strategist for the digital age, a web and TV personality, a bestselling author, and the award-winning CEO of The Marketing Zen Group – a global online marketing and digital PR company. She has aptly been dubbed the “Zen Master of Marketing” by Entrepreneur Magazine and the “Millennial Master of the Universe” by FastCompany.com. Shama has also been honored at both the White House and The United Nations as one of the top 100 young entrepreneurs in the country. Shama has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the prestigious Technology Titan Emerging Company CEO award. She was named one of the “Top 25 Entrepreneurs under 25” by Business Week in 2009, one of the “Top 30 Under 30” Entrepreneurs in America in 2014 by Inc. Magazine, and to the Forbes “30 Under 30” list of movers and shakers for 2015. LinkedIn named Hyder one of its “Top Voices” in Marketing & Social Media. Her web show Shama TV was awarded the “Hermes Gold award for Educational Programming in Electronic Media” and most recently she was awarded the “Excellence in Social Media Entrepreneurship” award for 2016 by Anokhi Media.

Web: www.shamahyder.com or Twitter: @Shama.

You can read more articles from Shama Hyder by clicking here

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Shama Hyder to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Shama Hyder is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Shama Hyder. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

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