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Legendary basketball coach John Wooden not only had some of the greatest players ever (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Walton to name just two) but he got them to play as a beautiful,steve strauss teamwork mentality.jpg harmonic team. Wooden’s UCLA teams won 10 NCAA championships between 1964 and 1975 and from 1971 to 1974, UCLA won 88 consecutive games, still a record in Men’s college basketball.

 

How does Wooden’s success apply to us now, while we work through a crisis in our small businesses? Let me tell you a few of his secrets; ideas you can use for your own business.

 

Start with the coach’s famous Pyramid of Success. Here’s my favorite story about this:

 

On the first day of practice every fall, every UCLA freshman was sat down and taught… how to tie his shoes.

 

According to Wooden, this was necessary for several reasons – basketball is played on your feet – but most importantly, it taught them the importance of little things, and how they add up.

 

“Little things make big things happen,” coach preached.

 

What does this have to do with your business? Everything.

 

All entrepreneurs want to create a great small business. The question is how. Of course, you need to serve the market with a valuable product or service, but just as importantly, you need to assemble and manage a great team that remembers little things make big things happen. 

 

Here’s a simple two-step process that can help you do just that:

 

1. Maintain a Great Culture: What made UCLA basketball so special was not only that Coach Wooden was able to attract top talent, but that he got everyone on the team to buy into the system.

 

Yes, he had some Hall of Fame players, but he had a lot more players who were more mediocre than meteoric. The difference in his teams was that the coach had created a system where even a B recruit could act and look like an A player.

 

In your world this means that you need to create a special culture; one that rewards your people and allows them to do their best work. One where, when they thrive, the entire organization benefits.

 

At this moment in time our cultures are likely going to take a hit. Take time to connect with your employees while they’re home and ask about how they’re doing personally. How are their families? If they’re working remotely find ways to support them. If you’re able to still be paying employees who can’t work from home be as transparent as you can about the future of the company and the steps you’re taking to keep them employed.

 

Additional reading: How to Help Your Employees Focus as They Work from Home

 

If you create the type of business and business culture where employees are treated well, where they feel appreciated, and where they are rewarded for a job well done, you will have created a small business culture that will reap tremendous rewards. Your people will love being part of it and will work hard to make sure you are a success.

 

2. Recruit (And Hang Onto!) Great Talent: Over the years, the best small businesses I have come across have a few things in common and one of them is that the owner knows his or her strengths, brings in people who can fill the gaps, and then lets them do just that.

 

The best small business owners are not micro-managers.

 

To assemble a special team, you need to employ people who fit and buy into your vision. You need people who are smart, savvy, dedicated, and coachable. People who see the big picture but who also are willing to pitch in on any level when times are tough.

 

Then you need to coach them. Show them what you expect and bring out the best in them.

 

This two-step system – recruiting great talent and then giving them an opportunity to shine – is the key to creating a great team, an exceptional team– a team that can work together to keep your business strong through a difficult time.

 

 

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated busteve strauss headshot.pngsiness columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Steve Strauss.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

by Chris Brogan.

 

All of us experience slow seasons together. Yours might be different than mine, but it’s likely that we’ll be in it together. What matters most when Slow Periods to Grow.jpgbusiness is slow is that we take advantage of this time (while taking time for ourselves and those we care for).

 

Slow Times are Growth Times

 

Let me start by telling you what most people do incorrectly with space and time. They fill it. Sometimes, they stuff it full of busywork that “needed to get done.” Other times, they look for meetings or calls they’ve been putting off.

 

When you hit slow times, the best possible use of this time is growth. This must be the measure by which you gauge the worth of actions you might take. Growth can mean rebuilding. It can be learning. It can be preparing for the next busy cycle.

 

You have the clients or customer base that you have, though they may be on hold for now. Think about how you’ll begin to get new ones. Look for partnerships. Look for new seeds to plant that will turn into rich opportunities later.

 

Call your best clients and see how you can help. This is slow season work for sure. That means your clients may also need a little boost in getting business. Ask if you can help grow their business in some way. Who turns away helpful people?

 

Make Your Own Conference

 

As a keynote speaker with thousands of friends in that industry, I can tell you that there are no shortages of quality content all over YouTube. Beyond just TED, there are more conferences posting material every single day. You could seek out a particular speaker, an industry, or an idea and find mountains of opportunities.

 

Because it’s your conference, you’re not relegated to live speakers on a stage. You can add documentaries and slideshows and instructional materials. You can learn from other industries and look for crossover points of support. This is a powerful way to fill a slow season day.

 

 

Write or Record Something Helpful

 

Your customers would love helpful guides, to-do materials, and more. When you’ve got some time, it’s a great time to create this kind of material. It’s a wonderful way to equip your customers for even more success.

 

You can do a step-by-step document, or if you want to get even bolder, you might make a small series of videos or audio recordings. Any of these can help.

 

Set Some Future Planning Days

 

Look at what’s coming this year, next year, and then five years out. Don’t just look at your own business. Think about what you’ve been reading and maybe even research more.

 

For instance, if self-driving cars and ride-sharing apps are reducing the number of new cars sold, that also means people will do a lot less “browsing” while driving. They’ll drive from destination to destination with fewer unplanned stops. How will that impact your business?

 

Never Overload the Slow Days

 

We often see slow times as an excuse to finish up busywork. The truth is, busy work needs to vanish. Priority or growth. Those are your only categories. And schedule this kind of work into only 40% or so of your calendar over these slow days. Leave room for spontaneous opportunities.

 

It’s vital that you look at slow days as an opportunity to prepare for success. That’s where it comes. From the planning, you do when the fires aren’t raging.

 

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Chris Brogan to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Chris Brogan. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

For manufacturers of every size in every industry, it’s no exaggeration to say that the coronavirus crisis has changed everything. Demand roberta-keiko-kitahara-santana-RfL3l-I1zhc-unsplash copy.jpgfor products has been upended, relationships with suppliers and customers are being tested and liquidity issues have multiplied.

 

Some manufacturers are pivoting to create essential gear to help combat the pandemic, while others are retooling in advance of future needs, and all are trying to keep their workers safe. Abhijit Bhide, managing director, Bank of America Global Banking and Markets, answers questions about this unprecedented upheaval and how businesses can respond now and in the months ahead.

 

Read more from our Global Banking & Markets team

Coronavirus Changes How We Work_Sized.jpgFor a guy who writes about future concepts and ways we could do business, sometimes it takes me a while to try new things.

 

I’d never used DoorDash until the pandemic rolled in. (No, this isn’t an ad for DoorDash.) I’ll talk about them in a moment. For the last 15 years, I’ve shared how to work at a distance. Only now, people are forced to consider that reality.

 

How Do You Do Business in a “Contactless” World?

 

As a business advisor, a lot of what I do is suggest ways companies can develop marketplaces around what they sell. I’m probably most well-known for advocating the use of social networks and media tools like YouTube and podcasting and Twitter for further developing ways to interact and sell.

 

But all this time, it’s been a “gee-whiz” and a nice to have.

 

When a global pandemic comes and forces governments to close businesses (most of them small, by the way), now we have to think about what it means to deliver our business remotely. The concept of “contactless” business is now a “thing.” And it has many implications.

 

Here are some questions for you to consider:

 

  • If you can’t sell and market face to face, what other ways can you find?
  • If people like your face-to-face experience, how can you recreate that online?
  • Not everyone loves coupons. How else can you stay top of mind for your buyers?
  • If people are watching more YouTube, Facebook, and TikTok while in quarantine, what can you do to reach them?
  • Do you have your customers’ email addresses? How will you earn them?

 

Let’s talk about this. On one hand, I know you’d rather things just go “back to normal.” But what if normal wasn’t exactly killing it for you? And nothing in life ever goes “back to normal.” It moves forward. And it changes. And eventually, we accept the “new normal.”

 

Digital Business and the Digital Channel

 

If you can’t sell and market face to face, you have to reach people where they are: their inbox and on various social networks. Yes, your buyer is online. My small-town Facebook group is populated by people who are mostly over 50, for instance. B2B people are actual humans and are also online.

 

Once you accept that everyone is online, the question is: how do we earn their attention?

 

  • People like how-to content. The COVID-19 quarantine data shows that people are filling some of their entertainment time with learning and educational content. Is there an angle there for you?
  • People like personable content. Can you shoot video showing what’s going on at your business and how you’re serving people?
  • People like to belong. Can you reinforce the identity of the people you serve?

 

Before this all happened, the prevailing idea of content marketing was that it existed to give people something interesting to consume that somehow related to your product or service. While that’s still true, the adaptation in a post COVID-19 world will focus more on transporting the more personable elements of your real-life presence into an online package.

 

Understand the New Cadence of Business

 

Part of your job rolling forward is to connect with people using various digital tools so you can keep customers and prospects feeling “warm” about your offerings in between opportunities to purchase from you.

 

This is the new cadence. It’s all about staying connected between sales moments. It’s about showing your support for the community you serve. It’s about being more personable and present.

 

All your functional work to make your business work in a contactless world is still before you. How do you sell? How do you deliver? What happens with the face-to-face parts of the experience? But the way you’ll earn and keep customers involves showing people a human face from a distance using all the digital tools out there.

 

Oh, and let me tell you about DoorDash. What made the experience great wasn’t the ordering platform (which was really well done) and it wasn’t the variety of restaurants (which is fine, but you kind of expect that), but instead, it was one detail: constant contact.

 

Every step of the way, I was notified:

 

  • Five Guys has your order.
  • Five Guys is making your food.
  • Five Guys says your food is ready for pickup.
  • Your DoorDash driver is picking up the food.
  • Your DoorDash driver is near.
  • Your DoorDash driver is here.

 

That level of connection was better than any other detail of the process. I got what I wanted and every step of the way I was kept in the loop.

 

What a lot of people want is a connected experience with a company that matches their views and values. What they need is good fast communication all the way through the process.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Chris Brogan to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Chris Brogan. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

Managing Remotely.jpgby Chris Brogan

 

I started helping companies figure out how to manage employees remotely in the late ‘90s.

 

The reasons were clear: It saved time, saved money, and improved the potential hiring pool because no longer would a company be limited to talent based on proximity alone. Well, welcome to 2020 and the millions of people working remotely for managers who haven’t once trained or much considered how to be a boss from afar.

 

The Problem with Managing Remote Workers

 

Managers are worried because they don’t have any real systems or tools in place, and they can easily envision a day when deadlines fall all over the floor and they (the managers) can’t explain clearly enough what their remote teams are doing or not doing to fix the challenge.

 

It’s a reasonable fear.

 

But the solution is NOT to bury someone in project management software hell. In fact, there are so many ways to do this wrong that an entire league of management consultants exist just to fix all the bad choices managers are doomed to make in moments like these.

 

Managing Remotely Is About Facilitation – Not Control

 

The goal of management in general is to help your team accomplish their tasks. You facilitate them. Your goal is to make their work environment as fluid and frictionless as possible. You exist to block other teams from interfering with your people. You profit when your team accomplishes their tasks and projects are completed on time and within budget. And it’s your job to know enough about all that’s going on to keep your boss in the loop, but MOSTLY to the tune of “we’ve got this” or “we’re slipping a bit.”

 

Tracking hours isn’t the answer period. That’s primitive. It’s not even worth a paragraph, but oh, here we are.

 

Tracking projects and flow is important, but so much software is built in a way to become a job unto itself. Systems that require 20% of a person’s daily attention to keep populated means that you’re eating more than an hour and a half of every eight-hour workday just filling in an app. That’s almost a full day EVERY WEEK lost to “productivity tools.”

 

Facilitate Success

 

What do you really need from your team? Status updates. Deliverables. Adherence to the deadline being the deadline.

 

What do they need from you? Assistance in clearing roadblocks. Resources when deadlines can’t be met. Support when challenges interfere with clear-cut experience.

 

“Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.” - Mike Tyson

 

There are some software tools that do this better than not. I’m very biased (I’ve had past business experiences) about Workfront as a tool because it’s built to allow input from a lot of other tools. One person wants to use Slack and another wants to use MS Project? Perfect. It all threads in. That’s the kind of tool your team needs because it means no one has to change their existing habits in terms of software.

 

There are other products out there to evaluate, and this post isn’t about software, but keep the essential detail: Flexible tools mean easier input and fewer hours wasted on accountability.

 

What is useful are small and simple status updates. In Slack or email or Teams or whatever everyone uses, send twice daily updates on projects. Keep the flow going. Workers be clear on if you’re ahead or behind or on time. Red/yellow/green works well.

 

Further, have brief meetings, not more meetings. An hour isn’t the universal meeting unit of measurement and nor is 30 minutes. Do 20. 15. 10. You’ll be amazed how much people can transfer in 10 minutes if you keep the status updates sharp. If someone’s part in that meeting requires more than a whole ten minutes, that’s an offline 1-on-1 call, not meeting material.

 

Above All Else, Facilitate Success

 

The tools won’t save you. Communication will.

 

Everyone has been gifted more time by removing their commute and all that entails. Don’t fill it back up with monotony. Lead these people to success by facilitating their interactions and give them all that extra time to do even better, more thorough work.

 

Treat your team like the winners they are.

 

You manage the best to deliver incredible results for a company that trusts your leadership. Make sure you preserve that reputation by keeping your team rolling forward.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Chris Brogan to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Chris Brogan. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

Mark Matthews is a “big wave” surfer who faces fear and uncertainty with every extreme ride he takes. And he has something important to teach us in this new coronavirus world in which we live. strauss lead pic.jpg

 

You probably have seen people like Mark on TV – those amazing, brave (crazy?), intrepid surfers who ride humungous waves in Hawaii, or Australia, or wherever the endless summer takes them.

 

Mark is profiled at the start of a great new book called, Wild Success: 7 Key Lessons Business Leaders Can Learn from Extreme Adventurers. I recently spoke with the authors, Amy Posey and Kevin Vallely, who make the point that Mark isn’t crazy at all. In fact, as they put it, he is quite rational, and the way he approaches an extreme event like Coronavirus, err, I mean riding a monster wave, is something we can all do.

 

How Mark and other extreme adventurers handle stress is by using a method called “reframing.Instead of focusing on the danger in front of him (riding a wave that could literally kill him), Mark reframes the situation into “less terrifying problems that he can solve now,noted author Amy Posey, a leadership expert in Silicon Valley with an emphasis on neuroscience.

 

So, before heading into the surf, “Mark goes through an intense mental preparation, where he scenario-plans the direst outcomes and plans ahead of time his responses. Mark analyzes what he would do if he can’t breathe, is bleeding, or gets knocked in the head. He prepares and plans for the worst far in advance, as well as right before he goes in the water, and in that way, the scary situation does not seem as scary.  Mark even brings a defibrator in the rescue boat that follows him, just in case.

 

“By cognitively reappraising the danger, Mark anticipates how he will respond to situations and reframes those scenarios into less-terrifying problems he can solve now, according to Posey and Vallely.

 

How to Reappraise Danger in Business

 

Can you use this strategy of “cognitively reappraising danger” in business? Here’s an example from the book:

 

Let’s say you are on a conference call, making a presentation and you flub it a bit. Your boss calls you out in front of everyone. One way to look at that situation is to be embarrassed, or angry, or to assume the worst about your boss’ intent.

 

But a better way, the extreme adventurer way, is to reframe it and “assume a positive intent.” Flip the situation. Maybe your boss was actually trying to help you get better at presenting. Or maybe he simply wanted to make sure the team understood what you were trying to say. The trick is to “reframe the narrative in situations you can’t control. Doing so enables you to reduce the negative emotional impact you feel and improve the clarity of your thinking.”

 

Do you see how valuable just this one simple tactic can be at this scary moment?

 

Chunk down the big fear into manageable ideas. Plan for how to deal with them. See yourself handling and managing them. Instead of feeling like a victim of a pandemic, reframe your thoughts and look for the opportunity for your business, in your ability to lead, in your chance to help your team.

 

As Vallely told me, “Emotions can be contagions too. Your positivity will spread among your team, just as your negativity will. And as a leader, how you act, how you put yourself out there is critical, especially now. If you show confidence you will sow confidence.”

 

The adventurers profiled in the book have a saying: “Nothing is considered a failure in an adventure.” It all is an opportunity to learn, to grow, and to have stories to tell (and boy will we have some stories to tell).

 

The end result is that, yes, we are in uncertain, frightening times. But the intrepid adventurer – and the intrepid business leader – can use uncertainty as an opportunity to innovate, reframe, re-label, learn, grow and teach.

 

Cowabunga indeed.

 

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Askan Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss steve strauss headshot.png

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Steve Strauss.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

 

 

 

In “normal” times, selling your product on Amazon seems like a good distribution choice, right? During February 2020 alone, Amazon.com had over 2.01 billion combined desktop and mobile visits making it by far the most visited e-commerce property in the United States. amazon pic.jpg

 

So, now, with the coronavirus pandemic in full swing, can a small business still expect the same service and fulfillment expertise to make signing up with Amazon worth it? Here’s some background to help you decide if selling on Amazon is the right choice for your business.

 

A Small Business Commitment

 

More than 1.9 million businesses, content creators, and developers in the U.S. use Amazon products and services and 58 percent of Amazon sales come from small and medium-sized businesses, according to the 2019 Amazon SMB Impact Report. Following is a breakdown of the pros and cons of doing business on Amazon for small business sellers.

 

  • Seller options: The type of seller you are really depends on how much you expect to  sell every month.

 

    • If you plan on selling less than 40 products per month and don’t need access to any seller programs or tools, you can sign up as an individual seller. This is a good option if you’re starting out small and just want to test the waters, since the fees are low—$0.99 per item sold, plus referral fees. Referral fees, which range from 8-15 percent, are based on what kind of item is sold and the selling price.

 

    • Professional sellers sell more than 40 products per month and want sales analytics and reports. Professionals pay a flat $39.99 per month, plus referral fees. Of course, you wouldn’t be paying these additional fees if you sold directly from your website; however, the added exposure of being on Amazon is probably worth it.

 

  • Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA): Likely the biggest advantage to putting your product on Amazon is the fulfillment power Amazon offers sellers by giving them access to its massive distribution network. Amazon has state-of-the-art fulfillment centers all over the country, so you simply ship your inventory to Amazon’s warehouses. The warehouses then store, sort, pick, pack and ship your products for you. Because Amazon has relationships with multiple carriers, you’ll benefit from deep discounts on shipping. Plus, your products are eligible for Amazon Free Shipping and Amazon Prime Free Two-Day shipping.

 

    • Note: There are many requirements Amazon demands of FBA users before it will accept products such as product titles, barcodes, labels, routing, storage limits and more. Again, the requirements may be worth the hassle since once the products are in Amazon’s hands, the company handles exchanges, refunds and returns.

 

  • Advertising: As an Amazon seller, you have a variety of options to boost visibility of your products.

 

    • “Sponsored Products” appear before other products when a user searches for a particular item, while “Sponsored Brands” appear at the very top of the search page and highlight your brand logo and a few of your items.

 

    • When the user clicks on your logo, they are taken to your Amazon store page. An Amazon Store page is your very own e-commerce site within Amazon and is free for sellers although you do need to have a trademarked brand or at least have applied for a trademark.

 

    • Finally, a new advertising option is the “Sponsored Display” ad which allows you to create a display ad to use on Amazon or other targets of your choosing. If your ad budget doesn’t allow for more than one giant placement then you might want to consider another avenue for your product ads. However, the amount of data Amazon continues to amass has made Amazon into the third-largest digital ad platform

 

There are restricted categories on Amazon where you may need approval before being able to sell your products. Only professional sellers can request approval to sell in these categories. Currently, the list includes such categories as:

 

  • Automotive and Powersports

 

  • Clothing, Accessories, Shoes and Luggage

 

  • Collectible Books

 

  • Collectible Coins

 

  • Entertainment Collectibles

 

  • Fine Art

 

  • Fine Jewelry

 

  • Grocery and Gourmet Foods

 

  • Toys and Games

 

  • Video, DVD and Blu-ray

 

Amazon in the Era of Covid-19

 

To address the incomparable demand for certain supplies, Amazon has announced a temporary prioritization of products coming into their fulfillment centers. Sellers can check which of their products are deemed high priority by checking their seller restock inventory page and their restock reports.

 

  • Eligibility is based on high-demand products customers need immediately; current inventory levels, inventory in transit; fulfillment center capacity; and the latest health guidelines. As you might guess, household staples and medical supplies are most in demand while the crisis continues.

 

At press time, Amazon is trying to find its “coronavirus footing” and still be the online marketplace offering the most inventory, quick delivery and worry-free fulfillment and at the same time keep employees healthy and safe.

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the Rieva headshot.pngblog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah./servlet/JiveServlet/downloadImage/38-3367-416250/Rieva+headshot.png/servlet/JiveServlet/downloadImage/38-3364-414071/Rieva+headshot.png

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Digital Strategy to Go.jpgby Steve Strauss

 

I want to share with you a simple, yet truly powerful success strategy that can work in any climate – including during a global pandemic.  (And note, this is not hyperbole.)

 

A little background:

 

About six months ago, I was on Facebook and a video ad popped up from a well-known “digital guru.” He explains how he has this great method for being able to – natch – “make millions.”

 

Riiiiiight.

 

But he’s good at this stuff, his video is captivating, and I know from my work that he is actually very successful, so I find myself clicking through.

 

The next thing I know, I‘ve listened to his entire hour and a half webinar, and most surprising to me, I bought his expensive training system.

 

I’m happy to say that it was totally worth my investment.

 

And I want to share the big takeaway with you because, especially right now, it can help you not only stay afloat, but get ahead.

 

Grow your email list.

 

This seems almost basic, like Internet 101, right? Wrong. At least not the way this guy does it.

 

Here’s the deal: What he recommends, and what I have tried and found really works, is to focus a significant amount of your marketing energy, and yes, some of your marketing dollars, on growing your list in a big way. Don’t just dabble, go for it, because the payoff can be huge.

 

A big list gives you big reach.

 

When someone provides their email address, when they “opt-in,” they are giving you permission to contact them again. These are warm leads; people who trust you and want to hear from you. When it’s time for you to sell something, you can email this list and be almost assured that a good number of the people you are pitching will say yes.

 

Take my new guru for example. To watch his hour-and-a-half video, I had to opt-in. But because he gave me real value in that webinar, I was happy I did, and in fact, when he emailed me the next day with his pitch, I was interested.

 

And I was not alone. By advertising on Facebook and getting people to opt-in, he now has a list of more than a half a million people.

 

Think about that for a second.

 

The next time he has a new product, be it some system, or an e-book, or info-product or whatever, with one email he can tell 500,000 potential customers about it. The way he explains it is that this is akin to Starbucks. People like going to Starbucks (or at least they used to.) Millions of people would go there every day. And so, when Starbucks has a new product to launch, they simply roll it out in the stores and those millions learn about it and are inclined to buy it because they trust the company and like its products.

 

For you and me, our expanded email list is our digital storefront. When we have something new to sell, we can roll it out by emailing our list and letting them know about it.

 

Does this really work?

 

Well, the guru recently launched a new podcast and used his list to tell his tribe about it. Within a few weeks, the podcast had become one of the top new shows on iTunes.

 

In my case, I have been using some of his methods and my own business email list recently topped 30,000.

 

There are four steps:

 

1. Create a free offer.

 

You have to give to get. What you give away for free in exchange for the opt-in should be something your potential customers would want – a free ebook, or podcast, free product, a discount, access to a special website, something.

 

2. Let them know about the offer.

 

Do so on your website, on your social channels, and yes, consider buying some pay-per-click ads to promote your offering. The bigger you grow your list, the bigger your reach and the higher your potential sales down the road.

 

3. Offer real value in exchange for the opt-in.

 

The webinar I listened to was chock-full of great info. No fluff. Give away your best stuff. If you do, people will trust and like you and believe what you tell them. You really don’t get a second chance to make a great first impression.

 

4. Don’t abuse the privilege.

 

When people trust you enough to give you their email, they are also trusting that you will not bombard them with spam and selling.

 

Then, when the time comes for you to launch your Carmel Mocha Macchiato and you write to your list, guess what?

 

They are going to want to buy it.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Steve Strauss.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

Finding Your North Star.jpgBefore GPS there were the stars. That’s how people navigated their way by land and by sea. Specifically, they’d look for Polaris, aka the North Star, the brightest star in the constellation Ursa Minor (Little Bear), more commonly known as the Little Dipper.

 

Polaris essentially aligns above the North Pole. The star appears motionless in the sky, with other stars seemingly rotating around it—making it a crucial “fixed point” to use for navigation.

 

Business owners should be as dependent upon North Stars as explorers once were. “In business, the North Star represents a company’s unwavering definition of its purpose, its products, its customers and potential acquirers,” according to Chief Executive.

 

The concept of following your North Star “emerged from Silicon Valley companies with breakout growth,” according to Growth Hackers. This evolved into a measurement—the North Star Metric (NSM), which is the “specific metric that best captures the core value your product delivers to customers.”

 

Where’s your North Star, Evan Goldberg?

 

All this suggests small business owners need to find their own North Stars. I recently talked to Evan Goldberg, founder and EVP of NetSuite, about how he found his.

 

Rieva Lesonsky: How do you define a North Star?

 

Evan Goldberg: A North Star is an analogy referring to the guiding principles behind a [business]. It’s [your] purpose, ambition and vision. Put more simply, it’s the reason [you] go into business in the first place. It’s a necessity for every business.

 

As an entrepreneur, it’s easy to lose sight of what’s important when there are so many distractions. You’re getting advice from everybody, adversity is challenging your thinking and assumptions, new opportunities are always presenting themselves, and the world around you is constantly changing.

 

These distractions make it hard to focus and that’s exactly why a North Star is so important. It guides your decision-making, brings your team, partners, investors, and other constituents together around a common set of goals, and keeps you on track as you navigate the twists and turns and side roads and forks that will define your organization’s journey.

 

Lesonsky: How did you know when you found your North Star?

 

Goldberg: It came out of my experience running a startup. I had multiple incompatible systems—one for finance, one for sales, one for support, one for web store—you get the gist. It was impossible to get an accurate picture of my business. My company didn’t succeed, but I learned a lot out of that failure.

 

I was on the phone with Larry Ellison, who helped me with the first company, about what I wanted to do next. We talked about the need for one system that organizations could use to simplify the management of their businesses and help them grow.

That 5-minute conversation became my North Star. Fast forward 20+ years and it’s still our North Star.

 

Lesonsky: Any advice for entrepreneurs and small business owners about how to find theirs?

 

Goldberg: Start by asking yourself three questions about your business: Who are you targeting, what problem are you solving, and how can you do it uniquely?

Usually, you start by knowing who you are targeting—for us, it was entrepreneurs and making their lives and the lives of their employees easier by helping them build a great business.

 

But to truly understand your target audience and their challenges, empathize—really listen and try to put yourself in their shoes. What are the problems they encounter every day that are keeping them from achieving their goals? And how do existing products or services fail to solve these problems?

 

Finally, you must ideate and determine how you will uniquely solve them. This is the core of your North Star. What is your differentiating approach? How can you do this in a way that will be hard for others to copy? As you start to answer those questions you will get a clearer view into what will set you apart from the competition.

 

When I started NetSuite in 1998, we provided accounting software on the internet and if I had said our North Star is to make accounting on the web, we would have had a very different journey.

Instead, thanks to the experience with my first startup we realized this was a common challenge—too many systems and no clear view of the business. So, we knew we needed to automate all of a company’s core operations in one system to give entrepreneurs everything they need to grow. This gave us a much broader purpose as well as a more meaningful reason to exist.

 

Lesonsky: Any advice on how you keep going?

 

Goldberg: The best advice I can give is "take it one step at a time." As the famous adage says, “a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step” and this is particularly true when you’re running a business.

 

There will be good times, there will be tough times and there will be everything in between. You will question your North Star, heck you will question everything, but staying focused on that next step—while keeping an eye on the future—will help you and your business keep going.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

 

 

Supply Chain Disruption_Sized.jpgby Rieva Lesonsky

 

While every national or global crisis has it's own specific challenges, it’s clear many small businesses can experience a delay or complete interruption in their supply chains when things go wrong.

 

Whether it’s the needed supplies to run your business, such as paper goods or cooking oil, or actual merchandise to sell, the unknown nature of the global pandemic will continue to make finding suppliers a challenge.

 

The Fragile Supply Chain

 

This most recent global health crisis has revealed the fragility of the supply chain. According to an article in The Atlantic, the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) found nearly “75 percent of the businesses it contacted in late February and early March reported some kind of supply-chain disruption due to the coronavirus. And 44 percent of the companies didn’t have a plan to deal with this kind of disruption.” ISM’s CEO, Tom Derry, told The Atlantic, that while this is “a little surprising...you have to realize there’s almost no industry sector—[in] manufacturing and nonmanufacturing—that isn’t reliant on China in the United States.”

 

What normally took a few days to move across the world or the country can take weeks or months. Even Amazon is feeling the effects from a shortage of stock, the increase of online orders and not enough workers to fulfill them all.

 

To get around the delays in normal supply operations, many small business owners are turning to local suppliers to keep inventory in stock.

 

When one Southern California sunglasses wholesaler found his orders from Chinese factories delayed by more than 45 days, he quickly contacted alternate sources to fill his orders. Adam Rizza, cofounder of Sunscape Eyewear, already had a backup network of local suppliers to call on when his regular international suppliers faced weeks of delays.

 

“We sourced goods from local distributors,” says Rizza, although he admits “it did affect our margins.”

 

A good backup plan is key to surviving a crisis situation.  Part of that is establishing supportive, friendly relationships with others in your industry.

 

“We had good relationships with other eyewear distributors before we became one ourselves,” says Rizza. If you haven’t developed those relationships yet, start now—even if it’s with your competitors. “Most business owners are well aware of all the competitors in their space,” says Rizza, so it can be easier to start with them. “The one thing we have seen during this difficult time is that our competitors are coming together and helping one another.”

 

Finding New Supply Sources

 

In addition to reaching out to other local businesses for supplier recommendations, contact your city, county or state’s economic or business development offices. Check with the local chamber of commerce in your area for member lists. You can also get assistance from your local Small Business Development Center or SCORE office. Although face-to-face appointments are not available now, SCORE is offering remote mentoring appointments.

 

Online marketplaces are a good place to source products, just be sure to check stock levels and delivery estimates for the best outcome. Websites such as Shopify, Amazon Business, and Alibaba all have both international and domestic suppliers ready to make deals.

 

When you’re creating a new supplier network, investigate new suppliers in North and Central America as well as around the world. Choose new suppliers from different regions so you’re not stuck in case of a regional disaster. Establish these relationships as soon as you can, you don’t want to wait until the next calamity to get to know these suppliers.

 

You also need to check in with your current transportation providers. Do they offer multiple methods of getting your products to you? If not, consider expanding your transportation network as well. It’s important to do business with a company that can pivot from one transportation method to another when necessary.

 

No one knows when the coronavirus pandemic will start to abate globally.  Take the time explore and expand your supplier contacts so the next time supply chains freeze up, you’ll be prepared.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

To help taxpayers weather the economic fallout of the coronavirus, the IRS has extended the April 15 federal income tax filing and payment deadline by three months to July 15.helloquence-OQMZwNd3ThU-unsplash.jpg

 

“During the three-month postponement, taxpayers won’t be subject to interest or penalties for filing after April 15,” says Mitchell Drossman, National Director of Wealth Planning Strategies for the Chief Investment Office of Merrill and Bank of America Private Bank.

 

Here are answers for some key questions you may have about the extension and your personal taxes, according to the Chief Investment Office of Merrill and Bank of America Private Bank. As always, it’s best to consult your tax advisor for guidance on what the tax extension might mean for you.

 

Who qualifies for the postponement?

 

The relief applies to any taxpayer with income tax returns and payments usually due on April 15. That includes individuals, trusts, estates, partnerships, associations, companies and corporations. There are no limitations on the amount of tax that may be postponed, and taxpayers do not need to make a formal request in order to take advantage of the postponement.

 

What tax filings and payments are or aren’t covered?

 

The provision applies to all 2019 federal income taxes. Self-employed people may also postpone filing and paying their estimated quarterly taxes for the first quarter of 2020, normally due on April 15, until July 15. But self-employed taxpayers should keep in mind that their estimates and payments for the second quarter will still be due on the usual date of June 15. And note that filings and payments for gift taxes are not postponed.

 

Does this mean more time to contribute to a tax-advantaged retirement plan or HSA?

 

Yes, at its coronavirus site the IRS states that the deadlines for 2019 contributions to IRAs, company-based retirement accounts and health savings accounts will all be extended from April 15 to July 15.

 

Are state and local taxes postponed as well?

 

“States generally follow the federal due dates, but it is best to check with your individual state,” Drossman says. For example, while California has extended its filing and payment deadline to July 15, Massachusetts suggests that residents use existing provisions to request extensions. Other states have yet to announce extension plans.

 

Can taxpayers file for an automatic extension beyond the July 15 deadline?

 

Tax payers have traditionally been able to request a 6-month tax extension by filing the proper paperwork by April 15—a move that’s particularly useful for filers whose taxes are complex. However, they’ve still been required to pay their taxes by April 15. Under this year’s tax postponement, the deadline for requesting this 6-month extension is now July 15. Taxes are still owed on July 15, 2020, and the filing deadline becomes Oct. 15.

 

Is there any reason not to take advantage of the federal extension?

 

If you believe you have a refund coming this year, filing your return on April 15 rather than taking the postponement could mean you receive your check sooner. Whatever your situation, it’s important to speak with your tax advisor before making any decisions.

 

For More Information visit the coronavirus site at irs.gov.

Cut Overhead and Keep Employees_Sizedjpg.jpgby Steve Strauss

 

As you well know, starting and owning your own business is expensive – rent, labor, insurance, etc. It all adds up. And in times of economic uncertainty, cutting back is likely high on your to-do list.

 

The question though is, can you do so without cutting back essential services?

 

Cutting employees might seem like a good way to trim your costs, but the fact is, laying off staff comes with its own set of problems - among them, a possibility for reduced productivity, loss of morale, loss of operational knowledge, and potentially, loss of customers.

 

The point: Business owners often say their most valuable asset is their employees. And most mean it. If that is true, what makes the most sense right now is retaining that asset and getting creative by cutting elsewhere and in unexpected places.

 

Here are three ways you can cut the fat without gutting your business and laying off staff:

 

Reduce hours and adjust schedules

 

In Portland, Ore., there is a beloved store called Kitchen Kaboodle. When the Great Recession hit in 2008, business fell off a cliff, and the owners were faced with tough choices: Close or fire almost everyone.

 

In the end, they did neither.

 

Instead, for the next few years, the store went to a shortened schedule, staying open only on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Ideal, no, but no one was let go and the store eventually came back stronger than ever.

 

So yes, one way to lower payroll costs is simply reducing hours. Offering full-time employees a part-time position is a win-win for everyone when the alternative is not having a job at all. Most people would rather work with their employer than lose all their income.

 

For you, it provides your business full coverage, though with a reduced staff, for a part-time budget. Ultimately, this method also provides that your seasoned staff members can have job security and your customers can have the service you are committed to.

 

Another method for reducing costs is optimization of business hours. If you are open 8 hours a day, 7 days a week, you might not be using your time and money wisely. Instead, have a smaller staff for slower days, and a full staff for the busier times. If some days are not profitable at all, do what Kitchen Kaboodle did and consider closing those days.

 

Improve operational efficiency

 

The next option is to consider how your business can operate more cost effectively while maintaining - or even improving - its efficiency.

 

This can look a few different ways:

 

  • For one, you should call suppliers and renegotiate your contracts, looking to pay less for your supplies. No doubt that today, vendors will be willing to have that conversation.

 

The coronavirus is an opportunity for your business to be hypervigilant in its own practices. In tough times, a little goes a long way, and either renegotiating with your suppliers or reforming in-house policies and behavior can save costs in the long term.

 

Think differently

 

Time to get creative. Instead of continuing to use that high-priced marketing consultant, consider bringing marketing and advertising in-house. Find out who on your team best knows social media and unleash their creative powers. This option will cut costs while still providing your business some much needed marketing muscle.

 

Or what about that basement space you’re using to store old items? Instead of letting the space go to waste, perhaps try to clean it and sublet it out to another business who could use the discounted space.

 

Bottom line: Each new crisis will end at some point, and you will be glad you kept the band together to make some new, beautiful music when the time comes.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Steve Strauss.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

Guide--Man.jpg

The Paycheck Protection Program is a federal relief program established by Congress and implemented by the U.S. Treasury Department and the SBA with rules, requirements, protocols and processes that all participating banks, including Bank of America, must follow.

 

In order to ensure an orderly flow of these government-provided funds, we will follow the intent of the U.S. Treasury guidance, including what has been posted at the U.S. Treasury website, that small businesses that plan to apply should do so with their current business loan provider.

 

Small Business clients with a business lending and a business deposit relationship at Bank of America are eligible to apply for a Paycheck Protection Program through our bank. A client’s pre-existing lending relationship with us may include small business credit cards, conventional business loan or lease, business lines of credit, business auto loans, practice solutions loans, trade and asset-based loans.

 

Small Business owners who do not have a business lending and business deposit relationship with us should contact their current business loan provider as soon as possible, if they plan to apply for the federal Paycheck Protection Program. This is the best and fastest method for applying for federal relief, based on the U.S. Treasury requirements and guidance.

 

All applications, information and correspondence about the Paycheck Protection Program at Bank of America will occur online and through email, including the application process, submission of required documents, and follow up correspondence.

Coronavirus Resources: What You Need to Know For Your Small Business.

As countless small business owners confront unprecedented financial challenges due to the Coronavirus (Covid-19), we are developing articles designed specifically to help your business navigate these anxious times. Our team of expert small business writers will provide guidance on remote workforce management, social media sales tactics, how to host a virtual seminar and much more advice to help your business. Make sure to check out this page frequently for updates.

We’re here for our small business clients Ready to Re-Open? Here’s what to Consider How to Create a Digital Course and Become a Thought Leader The Small Business Coronavirus Crisis Guide to Reading, Listening  and Attending Virtual Conferences Grow Your Network Now by Following the Best Practices for Social Networking How to Prepare Your Small Business to Reopen Why Your Business Should Empower a High-Touch Customer Service Approach Coronavirus Playbook: How to Increase the Value of Your Social Ad Spend Coronavirus Playbook: How to Share Costs with Other Small Businesses Defeating Coronavirus Requires a Teamwork Mentality How to Set Your Business Up for Post-Coronavirus Success Manufacturers Respond to Coronavirus How to Use the Uncertainty of Coronavirus to Innovate, Learn and Lead The Coronavirus Changes How We Work. Here’s What to Consider Is Amazon Right for Selling Your Goods During Coronavirus? A Digital Strategy to Grow Your Business During Coronavirus Managing Remotely During Coronavirus is about Communication, Not Tools Managing Coronavirus: How to Cut Overhead and Not Staff Coronavirus and Your Taxes: What Businesses and Individuals Need to Know About the IRS Tax Extension Tips on Preparing for a Long-Term Supply Chain Disruption During Coronavirus Outbreak Help Your Small Business Stay Healthy with a Coronavirus Crisis Communications Plan The 7 Social Media Do’s and Don’ts for Small Businesses During Coronavirus The Small Business Delivery Options to Tap During Coronavirus Stay at Home Rules How to Help Your Employees Focus as They Work from Home A Guide to Translating Live Events to Digital Platforms

With “stay-at-home” policies widely implemented across the nation to slow the coronavirus (Covid-19) spread, delivery services are quickly becoming part of the new normal. brett-jordan-phUtWl8RyFE-unsplash.jpg

So, if consumers can’t come to you, are you prepared to bring your products to them? Here’s how:

 

Delivering food

There are plenty of existing food delivery services in many American cites to choose, and the main players are offering incentives to businesses and consumers.

Here’s a sampling of what’s available at press time:

DoorDash

 

The company launched an #OpenForDelivery campaign, reminding consumers that restaurant delivery is safe and that restaurants need orders. The campaign includes social media posts, listing DoorDash and its competitors.

 

DoorDash announced “a package of commission relief and marketing support for new and existing DoorDash partner restaurants to help them generate up to $200 million in additional sales this year.” The program includes:

 

  • Through the end of April, independent restaurants in the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico, and Australia can sign up for free with DoorDash and Caviar and pay zero commissions for 30 days. Merchants will not be asked to pay anything back.
  • Existing DoorDash and Caviar restaurant partners won’t have to pay commission fees on pickup orders so customers can spend less time in the store. They are “also providing additional commission reductions for eligible merchants already on DoorDash.
  • To incentivize consumers, DoorDash has added over 100,000 independent restaurant partners to DashPass, their subscription program which offers $0 delivery for consumers for free.

 

Grubhub

Grubhub is deferring commission fees for impacted independent restaurants to help “increase restaurants’ cash flow.” They are “also matching all promotions run by independent restaurants, to help make their investments in growth twice as effective.”

 

Postmates

Postmates launched a Small Business Relief Pilot program for small businesses so they can more easily use their platform. The program will temporarily waive commission fees for businesses in some markets. They are talking to restaurant associations and city governments around the country to assess how to build on this and support local restaurant corridors.

 

Uber Eats

In their statement Uber Eats says they’re “working urgently to drive orders towards independent restaurants…, to help make up for the significant slowdown of in-restaurant dining.”

 

To drive consumer orders, Uber Eats has waived the delivery fee for the more than 100,000 independent restaurants they feature and launched a daily dedicated marketing campaign promoting delivery from local restaurants.

 

They’ve also rolled out a new payment option for restaurants, allowing them “to opt into daily payments on all Uber Eats orders, rather than the typical weekly billing cycle.”

Curbside pickup.

 

Several national retailers are offering curbside pickup for products bought online. Small business can easily adopt this practice. Post information on your website that you’re offering curbside pickup. Customers order online, pay and indicate they want curbside pickup. You process the order and then send an email or text that the order is ready for pickup.

 

When customers pull up to your place of business, they call you, and their products are brought outside and, in many cases, placed immediately in their trunk. No contact is made. Some independent bookstores are offering this option.

 

Other delivery options

If you’ve previously relied on services like Task Rabbit to deliver your products locally, Task Rabbit is now “asking clients to request contactless tasks.” That can still work for your business, however, the company says, “By requesting a contactless task, clients and Taskers agree to maintain a safe six-foot separation. For example, a client can request that a Tasker delivering essential food or medications leave them in a safe place at your door. Contactless tasks can be requested in the booking details or when chatting with your Tasker.”

 

Another option

 

Local entrepreneurs can team up with other local businesses and form your own local delivery service that can be used to deliver food or other products. Contact your local chamber of commerce, city government or its economic development agency to see if they can offer assistance.

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the Rieva headshot.pngblog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah./servlet/JiveServlet/downloadImage/38-3367-416250/Rieva+headshot.png/servlet/JiveServlet/downloadImage/38-3364-414071/Rieva+headshot.png

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2020 Bank of America Corporation

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