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2018

The latest Bank of America Hispanic Small Business Owner Spotlight surfaces a new and fascinating story about Hispanic small business owners across the nation.

 

It turns out that Hispanic small business owners are amongst the most positive, most successful, and most loyal entrepreneurs out there. That is the conclusion drawn from the second annual Bank of America Hispanic Small Business Owner Spotlight.

 

The Spotlight surveyed nearly 400 Hispanic small business owners, examining not only their dreams, aspirations, and success, but also where they stood vis-a-vis their non-Hispanic peers. As I said, the results are overwhelmingly positive.

 

Let me give you an example: When asked about their growth plans for their business over the next five years, 50% of non-Hispanic small business owners said that they planned on growing their business. That’s a robust, optimistic number, right? You bet, except that when asked the same question, fully 77% of Hispanic small business owners said the same thing.

Even more heartening is that 89% of Hispanic entrepreneurs said that they expected the business environment to get even better for them over the next decade.

 

That good, old-fashioned entrepreneurial enthusiasm is also found when the Hispanic business owners were asked about the overall economy. Whereas 46% of non-Hispanics thought that the economy would improve over the next 12 months, the Hispanic respondents were again even more optimistic with 60% indicating that they thought things would get even better. As a result, Hispanic business owners were more than twice as likely to say that they planned on hiring more people this next year.31020675_s.jpg

 

Another interesting aspect of this Bank of America Hispanic business owner survey has to do with the impact of cultural heritage on the business. Having married into an entrepreneurial Hispanic family myself, I can attest that it is not an insignificant issue. Mi familia at least is very proud of their heritage and it plays more than a little role in their businesses. The same looks to be true for the survey respondents. For example

 

  • 43% said that their Hispanic heritage helps their business grow: 41% said it has no impact while only 16% said it had a negative impact.
  • 42% indicated that their heritage helps them attract customers; 43% said it has no effect while only 15% said it harmed their business
  • 35% said their heritage helped them acquire and retain talent. Indicating that America really does strive to be race-neutral, more than half said race has no impact on their hiring with only 13% saying it was a detriment.

 

Related: Recruiting and Retaining Talent in the Evolving Small Business Workplace; Recruiting and Retaining Talent in the Evolving Small Business Workplace

 

USA! USA!

 

Like my own family, the Hispanic culture generally is family-oriented and tight-knit. It turns out that this too translates into business success. According to the survey, 61% of Hispanic small business owners rely on friends and family when it comes to running their business.

 

Indeed, it is often said that a small business is like a family, and the Hispanic business owners surveyed certainly proved that to be true with their clear propensity to take care of their staff: Hispanic entrepreneurs are twice as likely to have made investing in employees a goal in the last two years compared to non-Hispanics. Some of the things they offer are flex-time (41%), bonuses and rewards (27%), team-building activities (25%), and paid or unlimited vacation (19%.)

 

The bottom line is that with success and optimism far outpacing their non-Hispanic counterparts, it turns out that Hispanic entrepreneurs are as American as, well, mom and apple pie.

 

 

 

About Steve StraussSteve Strauss Headshot New.png

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss.

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Hispanic small business owners in the United States have reason to celebrate, according to the second annual Bank of America Business Advantage 2018 Hispanic Small Business Owner Spotlight.

 

The nationwide survey of Hispanic business owners reports that, just like Hispanic consumers, Hispanic entrepreneurs are a force to be reckoned with. Here’s a closer look at the state of Hispanic small businesses.

 

Early Tech Adopters

Hispanic business owners are early technology adopters—93 percent use digital tools, such as financial tracking and business management apps, compared to 73 percent of non-Hispanic entrepreneurs.

 

In addition, two-thirds say social media was important in helping them start their businesses, compared to 21 percent of non-Hispanic entrepreneurs. And 86 percent say social media is important to their success today; 53 percent say it positively impacts their bottom lines (compared to 47 percent and 29 percent of non-Hispanic entrepreneurs, respectively).41493464_s.jpg

 

Hispanic business owners use social media for multiple business purposes. More than three-fourths use it for marketing (compared to 49 percent of non-Hispanic business owners), 76 percent use it for networking (compared to 46 percent of non-Hispanic business owners), and 57 percent use it for hiring (compared to 23 percent of non-Hispanic business owners). 

 

Related: Social Media Primer: When to Post, How Often and What About

 

Investing in Employees

Another reason for the success of Hispanic entrepreneurs: 30 percent invest in their employees’ long-term growth and success, compared to just 14 percent of non-Hispanic business owners. About 80 percent of Hispanic business owners say being able to attract and retain quality employees has an effect on their business growth.

What steps are Hispanic entrepreneurs taking to attract and retain workers?

These are good first steps—but providing competitive benefits is vital, since health care, retirement plans and other basic benefits are key to employees’ loyalty.

 

Related: Four Things Small Business Owners Should Consider Before Offering Employee Healthcare

 

Lessons for All

What lessons can all small business owners learn from Hispanic entrepreneurs?

  1. Plan for the future. Be realistic about the challenges you face, and prepare a plan for overcoming them.
  2. Embrace new technology. Openness to new tech tools can put you ahead of the competition.
  3. Treat your employees well. Investing in your team is investing in your business.

 

Keep these rules in mind, and like 89 percent of Hispanic business owners, you’ll be confident the business environment will get even better for you in the next decade. For more, check out the Bank of America Business Advantage 2018 Hispanic Small Business Owner Spotlight.

 

 

About Rieva LesonskyRieva Lesonsky Headshot.png

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Learn how eight women found entrepreneurial success, their impact on society and the challenges they faced building their businesses. Although no two women have the same journeys, their collective advice creates five important insights into women owned businesses:

 

  • People and culture: The women entrepreneurs profiled focused on people – employees, vendors and customers – as much as on the business itself. They tried to create company cultures that helped people reach their full potential.030918_womens_ent_hero[1].jpg

 

  • Education, experience and a little luck: Many think entrepreneurship starts with a business idea, but there is more to it than that. The women entrepreneurs profiled earned degrees and gained business experience that helped them identify a societal or cultural shift, gap or unfilled need that, in turn, guided their business model.

 

  • Access to capital: A key theme that emerged for all was the importance of accessing capital. Only two of the women profiled sought equity investors. Six self-funded their businesses, wanting to keep their autonomy and maintain their people-focused culture.

 

  • Resiliency and optimism: The women interviewed showed that launching a company requires both optimism and resilience. They all faced and overcame adversity, but were similarly hard-wired with an understanding that setbacks were just part of the journey.

 

  • The importance of women’s leadership: All of the women profiled who started their careers in the 1970s said that having had more female colleagues would have made their paths to success less arduous. Consequently, all of them support younger women, both in business and in their communities.

 

Read the full profile here: WOMEN'S ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNEYS: PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP IN AN ERA OF NEW OPPORTUNITIES

 

Hispanic Small Business Owners Confident about the Future

 

Hispanic Small business entrepreneurs are confident the business climate will prove favorable in the decade ahead, according to the second annual Bank of America Business Advantage 2018 Hispanic Small Business Owner Spotlight (PDF).

 

Hispanic_SBOR.png

Bank of America surveyed nearly 400 Hispanic business owners across America to shine a light on the aspirations and concerns of this growing segment, and to examine the similarities and differences that exist when compared to non-Hispanic peers. For instance, Hispanic entrepreneurs feel a greater sense of confidence at both the local and national level when compared to their non-Hispanic contemporaries. This optimism is long-term, with most small business owners surveyed responding that the next decade will see ongoing prosperity.

 

Additional highlights include a focus on employee retention:

  • 81% of Hispanic business owners believe the ability to attract and retain quality employees positively impacts their business growth
  • 30% of Hispanic Business owners made it a goal to invest in their employees over the last two years – compared to 14% of non-Hispanic business owners

 

For a complete, in-depth look at the insights of the nation’s small business owners, download the Bank of America Business Advantage 2018 Hispanic Small Business Owner Spotlight (PDF).

Jen Welter is the first woman to coach in the NFL. As I read her new book, Play Big, I was deeply impressed by the powerful insights it offered for entrepreneurs. So, I reached out to her to talk through some lessons derived from her book and her own experiences to share with you here on the Business Advantage Small Business Community.

 

Play Big

For a small business, the challenge is often how you can compete with companies that are further along in their development. Welter suggests you play big on your own terms, with your own advantages. For example, she advises if you are at a disadvantage in terms of staff, resources etc., “…instead of trying to ‘out-big them’, why not out-little them? What you lack in size you have in mobility and responsiveness, so out-little and out-fast them – it’s what I did my whole career!”

Play Your Own Game

Success is not a one-size-fits-all proposition for anyone. For business owners, defining your own vision of success is critical, and being authentic is your competitive advantage. As Welter says, “Never try to play someone else’s game; you have to define your own. You cannot be all things to all people, nor should you want to be. What makes you different is absolutely what makes you special. Why fit in when you can stand up and stand out?”

 

Dr. Welter had to use her own measures of success as she played pro football and ultimately coached in the NFL. Use the same philosophy as you decide what goals and objectives are right for you.

 

Give Feedback with Grace

In Play Big, a great learning moment came from one of Dr. Welter’s coaches, who told her not to play for his football team, but he did so in a way that ultimately empowered her. Welter says that, “The best gift a coach can give a player is to make him or her better. If I knew a coach had my best interest at heart and was invested in me personally, I would run through a wall for that coach.” 

 

The same philosophy can be applied to your business dealings, with employees and partners. As Welter notes, “Feedback can be hard to deliver, especially when it seems like a ‘no’ or bad news. However, sometimes by sharing the thought process and a bigger picture for how a person fits in the puzzle or skills which would change the dynamic with improvement, you can actually set the person up for success, which should be the goal.”

 

Go All-in

One of Welter’s top mantras is, “If you really want to change the game, you have to be willing to bet on yourself. There is no guarantee for success, but there is a guarantee that if you don’t go for it, you will always wonder what would have happened if you would have tried.”

 

Entrepreneurs make that commitment up front, but sometimes that dedication becomes hard to sustain. However, continuing to be “all-in” makes all the difference in being successful. Welter adds, “…once you do go for it, you have to go after it. You will never regret the work you put in.”

 

Don’t Question Yourself

As an entrepreneur, you constantly face new challenges, which can bring about doubt and rejection. As Welter says, “Being an entrepreneur means that you are betting on yourself. You have a unique vision that has allowed you to see business in a different way, so guess what, there are going to be a whole lot of people who call you and/or your idea crazy. Guess what? I was told I was crazy my whole career. Guess what else? I love my brand of crazy. You can’t change the game by doing what has always been done and if someone else could see what you do, they might have already done it!”

 

Be Vulnerable

Finally, a key area that entrepreneurs struggle with is the emotional part of being an entrepreneur.  Whether it is opening up on their struggles to family, asking for help or admitting to feeling like a failure, many entrepreneurs put walls up. However, Welter advises vulnerability is a key part of attaining success.

 

“As athletes, we are taught never to admit fear and never to admit weakness,” she notes. “As a player, you want everyone around you to see you in a certain way – your teammates, coaches, fans, opponents should see you as capable, strong, good under pressure, an asset. It’s a persona which is developed with practice. However, what many athletes struggle with is when and if to turn that invincibility mode down, and with whom. This is a common challenge in business, as well. On the one hand, we want to have all the answers, but then we are stuck with no one to answer the questions. Needing help, or as I like to say, seeking next level greatness, means you just might have to get a bit uncomfortable and let that invincibility shield down and get help from others who can complement your talents, answer your questions and coach you.”

 

“Why limit yourself by your view of the situation and your personal expertise? That’s not strength. That’s being stubborn. Find trusted advisors or ‘teammates’ who push you to be better, that you can trust enough to let down your walls a bit.”

 

Hopefully, you can follow some of these tips from a true barrier-breaker to continue to break barriers in your own business. For more on Dr. Jen Welter, visit www.jenwelter.com and to learn more about her book, Play Big, click here.

 

Related Articles:

Interview with Confirm Biosciences, Inc. founder and CEO, Zeynep Ilgaz.

Dhani Jones explains why thinking like an athlete will score for your small business.

Why Thinking Like an Athlete Will Score for Your Small Business

 

 

About Carol Roth

Carol Roth Headshot for post.png

Carol Roth is the creator of the Future File ® legacy planning system, “recovering” investment banker, billion-dollar dealmaker, investor, entrepreneur, national media personality and author of the New York Times bestselling book, The Entrepreneur Equation. She is a judge on the Mark Burnett-produced technology competition show, America’s Greatest Makers and TV host and contributor, including

host

of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy. She is also an advisor to companies ranging from startups to major multi-national corporations and has an action figure made in her own likeness.

 

Web: www.CarolRoth.com or Twitter: @CarolJSRoth.

You can read more articles from Carol Roth by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Carol Roth to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Carol Roth is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Carol Roth. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

Revelations of sexual harassment, the #metoo movement and the #timesup campaign have put women’s equality in the spotlight. That makes 2018 the perfect year for your business to celebrate International Women’s Day (IWD), March 8.

 

Launched in 1911 by suffragettes supporting votes for women, International Women’s Day activities celebrate women’s achievements worldwide, work toward gender parity and encourage gender inclusiveness. This year’s theme is “Press for Progress,” to motivate people “to think, act and be gender inclusive.”

 

International Women’s Day is not specific to one country, group or organization. The IWD website recommends five things everyone can do to push forx parity:

  1. Maintain a gender parity mindset
  2. Challenge stereotypes and bias
  3. Promote positive visibility for women
  4. Influence others' beliefs and actions
  5. Celebrate women’s achievements

 

Here are some additional ideas you can use for your small business to #pushforparity.36823906_s.jpg

  1. Be inclusive. Do you have departments or teams that are dominated by men? What about business organizations you participate in? Speak up, call it out and take active steps toward making your business or organization more inclusive.
  2. Mentor women. How can you help women advance? Offer to mentor women in organizations you belong to or set up a mentorship program in your company.
  3. Help women in your community. Volunteer for or donate to nonprofits that help women in your area start businesses, become economically self-sufficient or escape poverty.
  4. Inspire the next generation. Offer to speak to local schools or girls’ organizations about career opportunities in your industry, or about being an entrepreneur. (The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts is the official charity of IWD, so your local Girl Scout troop could be a good place to start.)
  5. Identify bias in your own business. Does your marketing and advertising support stereotypes about women? If your website features a pretty woman in a tight dress, it’s time to change.
  6. Clean your own house. Are women in your business paid comparably to men in the same or similar jobs? Do you provide training to help prevent sexual harassment and take it seriously? Don’t just talk the talk; walk the walk, too.
  7. Support women-owned and -run businesses. Your chamber of commerce, the National Association of Women Business Owners, American Business Women’s Association, and Catalyst can help you identify businesses big and small that support or are owned by women. 
  8. Help women build their networks. Write positive online reviews of local women-owned businesses you work with. Recommend or endorse women you work with on LinkedIn and refer them to potential customers.
  9. Hold an event for women in your industry. It doesn’t have to be a big conference. How about a luncheon or networking event discussing the progress and future of women in your industry?
  10. Promote awareness. Create a marketing campaign around IWD. Donate a percentage of your sales for the month of March to a women’s organization, or offer discounts on products made by women-owned businesses.
  11. Spread the word on social media. Use the hashtag #pressforprogress on social media posts related to International Women’s Day. The IWD website has some suggestions for creative imagery you can use in your IWD social media posts to support the theme of pressing for progress. Send your social media posts to IWD; they’ll share some of the most engaging posts on their website and social channels.

 

Want more ideas? Search for IWD events here. You may find local events to participate in, or get inspired by other planned events. Publish your event here. The site also has widgets, selfie cards, videos, posters and other tools to promote IWD.

 

Remember, International Women's Day isn’t just one day. March 8 is only the start of a yearlong campaign to #pushforparity.  How will your business help?

 

Check out our Spotlight on Women

 

About Rieva LesonskyRieva Lesonsky Headshot.png

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

From Emily Ferber of Glossier cosmetics and Whitney Wolfe of the Bumble dating app to Jessica Alba of The Honest Company and designer Rebecca Minkoff, millennial women entrepreneurs are making waves.

 

But what about female millennials who aren’t so high profile? How are they changing the world of entrepreneurship? Here are five myths about millennial women entrepreneurs and the realities behind them.

 

1. Myth: Millennial women would rather climb the corporate ladder than start their own businesses.

 

Reality: Currently, millennial women are less likely than millennial men to be entrepreneurs, according to the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC). However, they’re extremely interested in becoming entrepreneurs. A whopping 83 percent of millennial women with full-time jobs want to start their own businesses, according to a survey by Buzz MG for Create & Cultivate. In fact, 55 percent of employed millennial women already have a “side hustle” in addition to their jobs.81866440_s.jpg

 

2. Myth: Millennials aren’t good with money. A popular image of the stereotypical millennial is someone who borrowed $200,000 for an underwater basket-weaving degree but still drops $12 a pop on avocado toast at brunch. Even millennials buy into these stereotypes. Seventy-three percent of millennials surveyed in Bank of America's Winter 2018 Better Money Report say their generation overspends and 64 percent think their generation is bad at managing money.

 

Reality: Millennials are actually doing pretty well financially. Nearly two-thirds say they regularly save money and 67 percent of those who set savings goals for themselves usually or always meet those goals. Almost half (47 percent) have $15,000 or more in savings while 16 percent have $100,000 or more stashed away.

 

3. Myth: Millennial women feel torn between motherhood and entrepreneurship.

 

Reality: Millennial women prioritize family, self, career and friends, in that order, according to Create & Cultivate. But they don’t think children vs. career is an “either/or” decision. In fact, the NWBC reports that millennial women entrepreneurs are more likely to be married and more likely to have children than their non-entrepreneur counterparts. Being married may be the financial cushion enabling them to start businesses without risking the family’s income. With 84 percent of both male and female millennials seeking work-life balance, many women see entrepreneurship as the way to reach that goal.

 

4. Myth: Millennial women are erasing the gender pay gap.

 

Reality: While pay parity is a huge concern for millennial women, there’s still a long way to go—and starting a business won't necessarily close the gap. Here are some shocking stats from the NWBC:

      • Millennial women entrepreneurs earn over 25 percent less than their counterparts in the labor force. In contrast, millennial men entrepreneurs earn more than their counterparts in the labor force.
      • Even when taking into account the number of hours worked, millennial women entrepreneurs make less than, on average, their male counterparts. This discrepancy exists regardless of industry.

 

5. Myth: Millennial women’s student loan debt prevents them from starting businesses.

 

Reality: More than six in 10 millennial women Create & Cultivate surveyed say they'd need $10,000 to $25,000 to start or grow their businesses, but 75 percent say they can’t access that much capital. It’s traditionally been harder for women to access financing than men. But is millennials’ focus on financial security part of the problem? The millennial women C&C polled value financial stability more than their side projects (and even more than their health). Fifty-six percent save any extra money they have, and 31 percent invest it.

 

Millennials’ financial fears aren’t unfounded. Fully one-fourth of millennials Bank of America polled have been laid off, and that’s not counting the number who saw siblings and parents lose jobs during the Great Recession. But is fear of financial instability keeping millennial women from taking the entrepreneurial leap?

Sometimes, the biggest challenges aren’t outside forces, but our own beliefs. I have faith that one day, women entrepreneurs will overcome the challenges that still hold them back. But we can’t wait for it, we must proactively make it happen.

 

Check out the Small Business Story Collection: The Unique Values Women Bring to Small Business Ownership.

 

 

About Rieva LesonskyRieva Lesonsky Headshot.png

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

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