Skip navigation
2016

CRM_body.jpgBy Robert Lerose.

 

Customer Relationship Management software, or CRM, has evolved from a simple customer contact capability to a suite of automated business-building tools. CRM solutions can now handle prospecting, lead generation, customer management, invoicing—in short, many tasks in the sales cycle.

 

When does a small business need CRM tools? How do you find one that's right for your company? What should you consider from a technology perspective? The online publication Small Business Trends gives these tips:

 

1. Know what your goal is

CRM comes with myriad features and benefits. Before you invest in a system, be clear on why you're getting it. What do you want it to do for your small business? What problems will it solve for you? How could it make you more profitable or save you time?

 

2. Make a wish list of features

After you identify the main goal, come up with a checklist of features to reach them. For example, a business that wants to broaden their marketing reach should look for CRM that offers good lead generation and enhanced customer contact.

 

3. Look for customization

Since your customers fall into different segments of the sales cycle, you'll need to send different targeted messaging. CRM that allows you to customize your communications will give you control and efficiency.

 

4. Make sure your CRM is easy to operate

There's no point in getting CRM with terrific features and benefits if you and your team find it hard or time-consuming to use. Look for a system with software and a dashboard that is clearly designed and simple to navigate.

 

CRM_PQ.jpg5. Be aware of costs and hidden fees

How much can you comfortably spend on a system? Let that guide you as you shop around. Keep in mind that the lowest-priced system is not always the best choice if it does not provide the service and speed you want. Know exactly what you're paying for. Watch out for providers that entice you with a low upfront price and then tack on hidden fees.

 

A growing number of companies are switching to cloud-based CRM, but is it right for your business? KarmaCRM, a CRM provider for small businesses, assesses the risks and rewards:

 

Pros:

 

1. Get access to your data at anytime

A cloud-based CRM lets you tap into your database whenever and wherever you need it, and from any device—smartphone, laptop, tablet, workstation—as long as you have an Internet connection.

 

2. Greater flexibility

A cloud-based CRM gives you the ability to update and add features to meet the demands of a growing business.

 

3. Cost effectiveness

Some businesses find that cloud-based solutions fit their budget better than maintaining and running an on-site CRM system.

 

Cons:

 

1. Security threats

Small businesses that adopt a cloud-based CRM solution also entrust the security of their data to the CRM provider. Despite the vigilance that cloud-based providers devote to security, it could be an area of concern.

 

2. Vendor stability

Your data could also be at risk if the CRM provider goes out of business. Some providers address this by setting up an arrangement that gives the small business owner access to their data even if the provider curtails its service.

 

3. Uploading data

Migrating data among different clouds could be problematic because of the diversity and incompatibility of operating systems and apps.

 

As with other key purchasing decisions, investing in CRM requires research in order to find the solution that works best for your small business. Whether you choose an on-site system or a cloud-based service, the point is to find the tools that make running and building your company easier and more efficient.

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Touchpoint Media Inc. to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Touchpoint Media Inc. is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Touchpoint Media Inc. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.

 

©2016 Bank of America Corporation

Writing a small business Q&A column, as I do for USA TODAY, I hear from a lot of entrepreneurs. The most common questions I get relate to what they can do to get ahead and move their business forward. Depending upon the circumstances, the answer might have to do with marketing, customer relations, or hiring, to name a few. However, there is one thing every small business owner can do if he or she wants to ensure success:

 

Be a good boss.

 

I recently saw a survey of the best, most successful small businesses in California. What did they have in common? Was it a great location, or advertising savvy, or financial literacy, or what? It turns out that the answer was that these superior businesses shared one common denominator: The owners were great managers, and their managers were also great managers. They managed in a friendly, participatory way and as a result their employees were happy. Happy employees make for happy customers, and happy customers become repeat customers.

 

So just what are the traits of a great manager? Here are seven of the most commonly acknowledged ones:

 

1. Great managers don’t micromanage: One happy employee I met at a conference recently had this to say about her boss: “What I love about working for Melinda is that she trusts me to do my job. I am allowed to think, and act, and she doesn’t swoop in like so many managers do, thinking they can do it better. Sure she coaches me, and I appreciate that. But she doesn’t try and do my job for me.”

 

2. They stay above office politics: Bad managers engage in gossip and petty office politics, pitting employees against one another, and maybe trying to gain some imagined tactical advantage for themselves. The opposite is also true – the best managers are a respite in the sometimes stormy seas of office politics. Rather than engaging, they are problem-solvers and peacemakers.

 

3. They foster teamwork: A great manager creates a great team by encouraging people to work together for the common good. They don’t play favorites. Great teams arise when, among other things, people feel acknowledged and are inspired to work for a logical, common goal.

 

Steve-Strauss--in-article-Medium.png

4. Great managers are great coaches: What is it people want from work? Whether the answer is more money or new skills, good bosses will work with their employees to help them get what they want, knowing that if employees get what they want, the business will benefit as a result. A good manager also knows that positivity trumps negativity and that criticisms need to be constructive, not destructive.

 

5. They are realistic: I once had a boss who gave me a project that should have easily taken two weeks to complete, but she told me to have it done in two days. When I walked in, exhausted, a couple of days later and handed it to her, I said that I could have used more time to do it right. “I know that,” she replied. “I was just testing you.” Man, I hated working for her.

 

The best managers push, but in a good way. They are realistic.

 

Click here to read more articles from small business expert Steve Strauss

 

6. They recognize people for a job well done: While financial rewards such as bonuses and pay raises are how most people want to be rewarded, money rewards are not always possible. Even so, a good manager does not let hard work go unrecognized; something as simple as saying ‘thank you’ can make the difference between someone feeling appreciated or alienated.

 

7. The best managers treat employees like adults: The ever-elusive ‘work/life balance’ is made much easier by the boss who knows that employees are not just employees and that they have lives of their own. Whether that means creating schedules that accommodate home life, or not expecting people to stay late without notice, a good manager respects their employee’s time. Ironically, that boss will end up with employees who will be willing to stay late when necessary, because what goes around comes around.

 

The bottom line is, as the businesses in the California survey found, being a good manager doesn’t cost, it pays.

 

About Steve Strauss

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest,The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business Success, visit his new website TheSelfEmployed, and follow him on Twitter. © Steven D. Strauss.

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.

©2016 Bank of America Corporation

Small business owners have so much on their plates that sometimes tasks slip through the cracks. While colleagues will easily forgive an unreturned phone call or a day-late proposal, the IRS won’t let a mistake slide. According to online payroll service SurePayroll, about 40 percent of small businesses incur an average of $845 per year in IRS penalties. Tax mistakes can also invite an audit, which is time-consuming and costly. Learn from other small business owners’ experiences and avoid these common tax mistakes.
taxmistakes_02.jpg
taxmistakes_04.jpg
taxmistakes_05.jpg
taxmistakes_06.jpg
taxmistakes_07.jpg
taxmistakes_14.jpg
Bank of America, N.A. engages with Touchpoint Media Inc. to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only.
Touchpoint Media Inc. is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license.
The third parties within articles are used under license from Touchpoint Media Inc.
Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.
Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.
©2016 Bank of America Corporation

Cost_Effective_Benefits_body.jpgBy Heather R. Johnson.

 

With healthcare and other costs rising, many small business owners face uncomfortable money conversations with employees. If you’ve trimmed all the fat from your expenses and still can’t afford annual raises, it’s time to get creative. Extend one or more additional benefits that will help retain valuable employees and possibly boost loyalty and employee satisfaction.

 

“Most employees consider compensation one of the most important benefits,” says Charles Tidball, a human resources manager for a Nashville-based advertising and design firm. “But many value generous time off, flex time, and other benefits as high or higher than compensation.”

 

If raises aren’t in the budget this year, consider these alternatives:

 

1. Paid Time Off (PTO) programs

Rather than allot a specific number of days for sick, vacation, and personal time, a PTO program offers a “bucket” of paid days off that employees can use as needed. PTO programs help reduce unscheduled absences and administrative costs. They also boost employee satisfaction by giving workers the freedom to make their own time-off decisions.

 

2. Telecommuting

Small business owners shouldn’t worry about losing control of their employees by allowing them to work from home. A 2012 Stanford University experiment showed that working from home led to a 13 percent performance increase, due in part to fewer breaks and a quieter working environment. “Employees want work life balance,” says Tidball. “Telecommuting offers tangible cost savings for employers and employees.” Employers save on energy costs and office space, while employees save gas and precious commute time.

 

Cost_Effective_Benefits_PQ.jpg3. Flex time

Like telecommuting, offering flex time shows you trust and respect your employees. Personal demands don’t always fit around a traditional nine-to-five schedule. Offering flex time to accommodate alternative schedules can create greater job satisfaction and enhanced productivity. “The important thing is that the employee gets their work done,” says Tidball. “With flex time, they don’t have to stress about getting to work late. The ability to schedule their time is very valuable.”

 

4. Development

You have great employees. Help them succeed and grow by offering ongoing development. Training and development programs keep employees engaged and productive. “Employees consider development a top reason to either leave a company or stay invested in career growth,” says Tidball. “It will cost money, but not as much as hiring and training a new employee. Focus your money on the most valuable people you’ve got.”

 

5. On-site childcare

Finding, paying for, and shuttling children to and from day care are some of the most challenging scheduling hurdles that working parents face. On-site day care lessens these burdens and allows parents to spend more time with their children. It also boosts employee morale and lowers absenteeism, which saves the company money. An on-site day care may not be feasible for many small businesses, but the company could consider partnering with a neighboring business to form a day care cooperative or negotiating a discounted rate with a nearby day care facililty. “It’s a little costly,” says Tidball. “But it might be cheaper than across-the-board raises and the returns could be worth it.”

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Touchpoint Media Inc. to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Touchpoint Media Inc. is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Touchpoint Media Inc. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.

 

©2015 Bank of America Corporation

Tech_Tools_body.jpgBy Robert Lerose.

 

With the beginning of a new year, many small business owners decide they're going to be better organized or punctual or productive—only to find themselves slipping back into their old habits.

 

To keep that from happening, we checked in with some thought leaders to get their recommendations for tech tools to help small business owners work smarter.

 

From Jayson DeMers, CEO at AudienceBloom, a Seattle, Washington-based Internet marketing company:

  • Roboform: An app that manages all your passwords, gives you secure access to them wherever you are, and lets you log in to a favorite website with one click.
  • Evernote: App for organizing notes, tasks, and images that can be searched by keyword, shared with others, and synched across your computer or smartphone.

 

Tech_Tools_PQ.jpgFrom Steve Nicastro, a financial writer for NerdWallet, a personal finance website:

  • Addappt: An app that updates the contact information in your address book automatically.
  • Pushover: For business owners with multiple phones or devices, this app organizes all your messages in one location.
  • OmniFocus: A task management app that tracks assignments and due dates, reviews completed projects, and lets you toggle between your smartphone and desktop.
  • Dropbox: A cloud-based platform that lets you store and share files with multiple parties.

 

From Umar Khan at BuildFire, a mobile app development platform team:

  • OfficeTimer: Software that keeps track of billable hours and project expenses. Also provides invoicing and report summaries.
  • Docusign: Service that lets you send, sign, and approve documents from almost any location.

 

Taking advantage of these innovative and time-saving tech tools is one resolution that could make you more efficient and organized.

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Touchpoint Media Inc. to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Touchpoint Media Inc. is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Touchpoint Media Inc. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.

 

©2016 Bank of America Corporation

 

 

Retirement_Tips_body.jpgBy Erin O'Donnell.

 

A 2014 study by the Guardian Life Insurance Company of America showed that nearly half of small business owners surveyed don't feel well prepared for retirement. But it doesn't have to be that way. A number of tools and strategies are available for small business owners to maximize their savings and minimize their tax burden. Here are a few tips to get you started.

 

Know your numbers

It's no secret that the earlier you start saving, the more time your money has to grow. But even if you're closer to the end of your working years than the beginning, it's never too late to save.

 

How much do you need? The conventional wisdom is shifting. Traditionally, people were advised that they'd need 70 to 80 percent of their current income in retirement. But some believe it's wiser to plan around your current spending patterns instead. Run the numbers a few different ways.

 

Diversify your money

According to the Guardian survey, small business owners are overly reliant on the success of their business to fund their retirement, and that's a risky move. Don't keep all your eggs in one basket. Of more than 1,400 small business owners surveyed, 77 percent said they did have money set aside in their own savings or investments, and 54 percent have invested in real estate. (About three-fourths of respondents owned businesses with one to 10 employees.)

 

Several tax-deferred retirement plans are available to small business owners and sole proprietors. See www.irs.gov/retirement for contribution limits and other details. The U.S. Department of Labor also produces a guide to choosing a retirement solution for your small business.

 

Retirement_Tips_PQ.jpg

Max out your savings

By age 40, entrepreneur Jonathan B. Smith still didn't have any real retirement savings. So, Smith researched retirement plans and chose an individual 401(k) plus a Roth IRA, which offered the highest contribution amounts and the tax benefits he wanted. He used the funds from a recently exited investment to open his accounts.

 

"I thought, it makes more sense to put money away in single person 401(k) than to pay the current taxes," Smith says.

 

Take advantage of perks for business owners

Business owners are also allowed to contribute more to certain retirement plans than employees. For 2015 and 2016, the defined contribution limit from all sources is $53,000 for a 401(k). A business owner or solopreneur can contribute most of that him or herself, based on their income from the business. In contrast, company employees can contribute only $18,000 through elective deferrals, plus the company's matching contribution, if available (usually about 4 percent of salary).

 

Keep growing your company

A lot of small business owners expect to sell their business to fund their retirement. Unfortunately, many overestimate the value of their company, and a sale doesn't meet their retirement needs.

 

The key is to have a firm grasp of your company's value and keep it growing right up until the day you retire, says Bill Watson, who brokers business sales through his firm, Advanced Business Group. "If you know how to maximize that value, you will maximize the money you make as you go along and be able to put aside more for retirement," Watson says.

 

Don't fall into the trap of thinking your business can coast in your final working years. If you're not building value by continuing to seek new business, Watson says, your value will drop exponentially in a very short time."If you're transitioning to a sale, your business should be on an upward trend until you get the price you want," he says.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Touchpoint Media Inc. to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Touchpoint Media Inc. is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Touchpoint Media Inc. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.

 

©2016 Bank of America Corporation

Whether you do it yourself or pay an outside professional, preparing your taxes eats up time, money, resources—and may result in having to write a substantial check to the IRS. So with all the built-in anguish the first time around, why would a small business pay for the privilege of having their return reviewed before submitting it? The most oft-cited reason: it could save you money. An independent tax professional who did not prepare your original return could find places where you have overpaid or not taken all the deductions you are entitled to. That’s just one of the tips that can help your small business save money. As tax time quickly approaches, consider these other recommendations and facts as you prepare your return.

 

 

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A TAX PREPARER
taxmoves_19.jpg
taxmoves_10.jpg
taxmoves_11.jpg
taxmoves_15.jpg
taxmoves_12.jpg
taxmoves_17.jpg
Sources:
1. 5 Tips for Choosing a Tax Return Preparer. Taxpayer Advocate Service, January 13, 2015.
http://www.taxpayeradvocate.irs.gov/news/5-tips-for-choosing-a-tax-preparer?category=TaxNews&taxissue+1046

 

2. The 5 Biggest Tax Mistakes Small Business Owners Make. CPA Practice Advisor. December 23, 2015. http://www.cpapracticeadvisor.com/news/12151711/the-5-biggest-tax-mistakes-small-business-owners-make

 

3. 10 Questions to Ask When Working With an Accountant. Entrepreneur. April 8, 2014. http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/232841

 

4. U.S. Government Accounting Office Report on Small Businesses and the IRS. June 2015, page 6. http://www.gao.gov/assets/680/671084.pdf

 

5. Take Back the Cash: A Guide to 2014 Tax Deductions for Your Small Business. Behalf.com. April 8, 2014. http://blog.behalf.com/take-back-the-cash-a-guide-to-2014-tax-deductions-for-your-small-business

 

6. Findings of GAO reported from Congressional Record, Volume 151, Number 43, April 13, 2005.https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CREC-2005-04-13/html/CREC-2005-04-13-pt1-PgE645-3.htm

 

7. 7 Common Small Business Tax Misperceptions, by Robert Lipton, Engine Builder, March 4, 2014. http://www.enginebuildermag.com/2014/03/7-common-small-business-tax-misperceptions-2/

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Touchpoint Media Inc. to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only.
Touchpoint Media Inc. is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license.
The third parties within articles are used under license from Touchpoint Media Inc.
Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.
Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.
©2016 Bank of America Corporation

Data_Video_body.jpgBy Jennifer Shaheen.

 

Programmatic advertising, which uses customers’ online behaviors, as well as factors such as their geographic location, the time of day, and even the weather, to serve them targeted ads they’ll likely find relevant, will play a prominent role in the coming year. In fact, Joshua Spanner, head of Google’s Media Labs, says programmatic advertising is a big focus for the search engine company in 2016 and beyond. Here are a few of the reasons why you should consider this form of marketing for your small business:

 

There is a huge hunger for video

Video is far and away the most popular type of content on both desktop and mobile devices. Cisco Systems recently reported that video content will account for 69 percent of all consumer internet traffic by 2017. In fact, one in three mobile device users report watching video regularly, giving the clips they see on their small screens much more attention than anything they view on television. Creating video ads to appear in this highly focused environment for strategically targeted customers gives small business owners a unique opportunity to raise brand awareness and generate sales.

 

Video advertising opportunities abound on familiar platforms

The most robust data-driven video marketing opportunities for small business owners exist on the most familiar, well-established platforms: Google’s YouTube, as well as Facebook and Twitter. Each of these platforms offers an easy-to-use back-end, allowing business owners to target their ads upon very specific criteria.

 

Data_Video_PQ.jpgEA Sports, a video game company, recently ran a successful campaign targeting fans of particular NFL football teams. L’Oreal Cosmetics targeted women between the ages of 25 and 30 who had previously purchased luxury beauty products online, when attempting to relaunch its Shu Uemura cosmetic line to the U.S. marketplace. The campaign was a huge success, resulting in a 2,000-plus percent return on the advertising investment.

 

Be strategic about content type, timing, and distribution

Context targeting is the practice of matching your video ad with video content that makes sense. For example, if you’re promoting a jazz or music festival, it makes sense to have your video ads appear on popular videos in the same genre being watched by your target audience—say, young adults in your geographic region.

 

Timing of video ads is both an art and a science. Take advantage of the metrics provided by your advertising platform to determine what time of day results in the greatest levels of ad engagement. The number of views is important, but knowing how many ad viewers clicked through to your website, downloaded an informative guide, or otherwise responded to your call to action, is more vital. This requires testing ads at different times, but the investment can be well worth it. More than one business owner has been surprised to discover that they have avid customers who like to shop or do research in the middle of the night.

 

Finally, be strategic about which platform you’ll be advertising on. YouTube will probably continue to be the dominant player in the video marketplace, but Facebook and other social media sites have been taking aggressive steps to incorporate video marketing directly onto their platforms, ensuring that users stay on the site for an extended period of time. Test ads on different platforms to discover what works best for you.

 

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Touchpoint Media Inc. to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Touchpoint Media Inc. is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Touchpoint Media Inc. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.

 

  ©2015 Bank of America Corporation

This truly is an amazing time to be a small business owner, for many reasons, but two in particular:

 

First, small is the new big. Not long ago, big was big. We had two giant superpowers, the “Big Three” automakers, three television networks, and so on. Not today. Today, whether we are talking about entrepreneurs like Mark Zuckerberg or how small businesses are proliferating around th

Steve-Strauss--in-article-Medium.png

e world, entrepreneurs and small businesses are being celebrated.

 

Second, technology has leveled the playing field. Today, any small business can act small but look big. We have access to some incredible tools that previously were only the domain of the big boys.


This is especially true when it comes to marketing; it used to be so much more challenging and expensive. For example, back in the day you might have put an ad in the newspaper and maybe people would see it, but maybe not. Or you might have bought some television time, hoping that folks would see it and not change stations or would take some desired action.

 

That’s a lot of maybes and hoping.

 

Today things are so much easier, better, and less expensive. Let me suggest five key e-marketing tools that you really should be using right now if you want to fully take advantage of this golden age of small business:

 

1. Your great website: You will notice I didn’t say “your website.” I said, “your great website.” There’s a difference, a big difference. The days when you could simply throw up a bland, boring – or worse, ugly – site are long gone.

 

Question: What is the first thing someone will do when they initially hear about you or your business and are thinking about working w

ith you? That’s right, they will look you up on the Internet. What will they find when they look you up? That’s the question.

Do you remember the old vocabulary building commercial, “People will judge you by the words you use”? Not only was that true then (and now) but what is even truer is that they will judge you based on your website.

 

Have a great one and you are in the game; don’t, and you are not.

 

2. Content: “Content Marketing” is all the rage for a reason – it works. By sharing content that puts your best foot forward, is interesting and engaging, links back to your site, and brands your business, you offer people a valuable way to engage with your brand.

 

Your content can be shared in a variety of different platforms, including:

 

  • Social media posts
  • E-newsletters
  • A blog
  • Articles on your site or others
  • Videos and podcasts

 

3. Mobile marketing: Check out this amazing stat: Half of all searches are now done on mobile devices. And, not only that, almost half of those searches have a local intent. That means that people are out there in your neighborhood right now, looking to buy what you have to sell, and many of them are searching for where to do so.

 

It is not a good idea to have a mobile marketing strategy. It is imperative that you have one.

 

Click here to read more articles from small business expert Steve Strauss


4. Social media: You know the drill by now: Social media is the next great marketing frontier! It’s almost a cliché. But that doesn’t mean it’s not true.

 

Social media has become the giant marketing tool that it is because 1) it is where the eyeballs are, 2) it doesn’t cost money per se (although of course, time is a form of money), and 3) it’s a place where you can build your brand and customer base directly, without any filters between you and your audience.

 

5. Pay-per-click (PPC): PPC may be my personal favorite. Why? Because you can market your business so efficiently and affordably using those little Google or Bing or Facebook ads. If someone sees your ad and likes it, they will click on it and come to your site. Only then do you pay for that ad. If they don’t click on it, you pay nothing. As such, PPC allows you to create, and only pay for, qualified leads. Amazing. Different. Better.

 

So yes, it is definitely an amazing time to be in business, and it’s an even better time if you take advantage of some of the great e-tools available today.


About Steve Strauss

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest,The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business Success, visit his new website TheSelfEmployed, and follow him on Twitter. © Steven D. Strauss.

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.

©2016 Bank of America Corporation

 

Filter Article

By tag: