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Before I started the entrepreneurial chapter of my life, I managed a staff of 30 who ranged from recent college graduates to those nearing retirement. And, although they were atcowomen-pd5FVvQ9-aY-unsplash.jpg different life stages (and therefore had different motivations and goals), I tried to build a cohesive team that thought outside the box and worked collaboratively to build the best product possible.

 

Oh, there were some bad seeds every now and then, but I learned as you try to foster certain traits in your employees, you’ll be rewarded tenfold. I was always conscious of the bad bosses I’d had in my career and vowed to never be like them—creating a corporate “golden rule.”

 

These are the traits I found to be the most important to foster in employees.

 

1. Flexibility and adaptability

 

I believe in the “if it ain’t broke, break it” theory of management. Every so often I’d announce to my staff,  “let’s shake it up.” The end result was usually better—and even when it wasn’t, we still learned a valuable lesson.

 

For structured personalities, being flexible might be a difficult trait to learn. But, in a small business, everyone needs to be flexible enough to handle difficult situations and adaptable enough to come up with solutions.

 

The American Psychological Association reports there are three types of adaptability:

  • Cognitive: the way one thinks
  • Emotional: the way one feels
  • Behavioral: the way one acts

 

The idea is to make employees, well, comfortable with being pushed out of their comfort zone. Once they are, you end up with a team able to handle new challenges without flipping into crisis mode.

 

It’s important to lead by example when unpredictable events occur. Be calm and discuss possible solutions with your team. By showing your staff how compromise, collaboration and calmness can prevail, you’re modeling how to handle future challenges.

 

2. Perseverance

 

As an entrepreneur you know the road to success is fraught with setbacks. You won’t succeed without having the “grit” to persevere and keep moving and the resiliency to bounce back when obstacles appear.

 

Fostering the same attitudes in your employees is just as important. When you assign a large or difficult project to an employee, explain the goal and the difficulty. Offer encouragement and support. Commiserate when needed. (I found feeding my staff kept them going). Fostering perseverance results in confident, resourceful and self-reliant workers who take pride in their work.

 

3. Self-confidence

 

You probably learned this on the playground in elementary school, but the more insecure a person is, the less willing they are to work with others and the more disruptive they are to your business. Sometimes insecurity in the workplace can lead to a toxic environment that breeds distrust and unhealthy competition. My most self-confident employees were the ones more willing to share and encourage others.

 

Some people are seemingly born confident, but it’s possible to “breed” confidence in those who lack it. One way to do that—recognition. Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report shows how “recognition motivates employees, gives them a sense of accomplishment and makes them feel appreciated for their work.”

 

The report says the “act of recognition also sends messages to other employees about what success looks like. In this way, recognition is both a tool for personal reward and an opportunity to reinforce the desired behavior to other employees.”

 

Being acknowledged for a job well-done instills self-confidence and encourages employees to accept more responsibility and greater challenges going forward. Adding a small reward (a $25 gift card; a comp day) encourages people to work harder.

 

Today’s business owners are worried about employee attraction and retention. Many businesses are focusing on the attraction part while ignoring the retention aspect. But making employees a valuable part of your team, fostering these traits and empowering them can lead to a better business with less turnover and more profitability.

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Do you have a business expense reimbursement horror story? I bet you do. We all do. webaroo-com-au-em37kS8WJJQ-unsplash.jpg

 

My latest is with a well-known company for whom I speak at events every year. The accounts payable people know me. I’m in the system. I’ve been submitting invoices to them for years. And yet, even so, last year it took five months to get my travel expenses for an event reimbursed.

 

I get it – I’m a small fish in a very large pond, but still. Imagine if I were an employee trying to get repaid for expenses I incurred on behalf of the company. I would not be a happy camper.

 

This issue is especially relevant for small businesses. Employees and accounting folk equally seem to dislike expense reports and reporting. One common solution then is to give company credit cards to appropriate staff members.

 

This intuitively makes sense, but does it work in actuality? Consider the pros and cons:

 

Pro: Ease of use. Let’s face it – expense reports are a pain in the rear for everyone. Employees don’t like filling them out (even if they are digital) and often do so late, and management often does not prioritize paying them. Expense reports take up time and eat up resources.

 

Giving employees credit cards may remove the need for cumbersome expense reports. And equally, it is easy for the bookkeeping team to review credit card bills and charges online. All in all, credit cards can make everyone’s lives easier.

 

Con: Overspending. Because the point of a credit card is to make spending easier, some employees may abuse that privilege.  Check with your credit card company to see if they offer employee misuse protection.

 

Watch this video about managing a credit line for your corporate credit card.

 

Pro: Happier, appreciative employees. On the other hand, having a company credit card makes taking clients out to dinner easy. Indeed, it can be stressful for some staff members to entertain clients or buy expensive items on their own dime, knowing it may take time to be reimbursed. Removing that stress will be much appreciated.

 

Similarly, the time savings of not having to fill out expense reports – and not having to wait to get them paid – will be very welcome as well.

 

Con: Comingling. Another downside is that, because using a company card is in fact so easy, it can sometimes be too easy for employees to accidentally (or accidentally on purpose) mix personal and business expenses. As such, two things are critical:

 

  • The employee must be someone you inherently trust
  • You need to remember the immortal words of Ronald Reagan about the Soviet Union regarding the SALT arms control treaty: “Trust but verify.” It will be incumbent on your bookkeeper to keep close tabs on credit card expenses.

 

For the employer, one benefit is that expense monitoring can be done more easily. Checking online for what has been charged can be done effortlessly, quietly, and as often as desired.

 

Learn how to easily manage your business with account alerts.

 

Pro: Card benefits. These days, credit card rewards are common, often generous, and so, if employees are using cards for company expenses, those card benefits will go to the business.

 

All in all, while there are definitely some risks to consider, they usually can be mitigated fairly easily and as such, the pros of issuing company credit cards usually outweigh the cons.

 

Next: Find the credit card to fit your business needs.

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert Steve+Strauss+Headshot+SBC.pngcolumn is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss.

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Let’s say you hired a great team, operations are going smoothly and all your employees are thriving. You lean back in your chair, relax and say, “My job here is done.”  woman-sharing-her-presentation-with-her-colleagues-3153198.jpg

Soon your stellar team starts lagging and the quality of work no longer meets your expectations. Rather than hire new employees, which can be time-consuming and costly, you may start asking yourself “How can I motivate my team members?”

 

There are many ways to motivate employees that are not just focused on rewards and incentives. Here are five ways to bring the spark back and help boost performance.

 

1. Acknowledging good work – A simple thank you can go a long way. By showing an employee you notice the good work he/she is putting in, you inspire them to keep it up. You can also upgrade your typical ‘thank you for your hard work’ and go public by posting about your employees’ great work on your website or social media channels. With this extra step, you create a sense of appreciation and value in your employee.

 

2. Opportunity to grow – Knowing there are opportunities for promotion, employees are self-motivated to become more adept at their job. Take time to work with them to define a career path, and provide an overview of what their options are.

 

3. Encourage breaks – Create a work environment where it’s advised to take short breaks from working at a desk. Encourage going outside for fresh air or getting up to stretch and recharge. Another option is to Incorporate sit-stand desks that get employees moving while working. Texas A&M University research found employees using them are up to 46 percent more productive.

 

4. Provide external learning – Offering opportunities for employees to attend paid training sessions, lectures or networking events is a great way to help grow skills to further develop their career. In return, having a knowledgeable employee will benefit the business. Also, attending sessions and trainings is a great way to break up the day-to-day monotony.

 

5. Accept differences – Every employee is different. What works for one, might not work for another. Getting to know the people working for you is critical for having motivated employees. Acknowledging the individuality of each member on your team, and knowing that people are inspired by different things, is a vital step in effectively motivating employees.

 

So, take some time to grab coffee with your employees, ask them how they’re doing and find out what makes them happy. The benefits you reap from open communication far outweigh the costs of finding that extra time. 

 

Additional Reading

When you’re looking to build your workforce, you want to hire the best people you can find. The greater the talent you can recruit, the more you’ll get for your earnings and the filip-bunkens-MfA21vhkVLg-unsplash.jpgfaster your business will grow.

 

But that search used to come with a powerful limit: you could only hire the best people you could find within a small area near your office. A software developer with exactly the experience you need or a copywriter with a style that’s perfect for your business is of no use if they’re a long commute away. Relocation is expensive and risky.

That means you’re fishing in a small pond—and if that pond is a long way from cities or creative hubs, it might not contain the fish you need.

The solution has come in the form of remote work. When a team member needs nothing more than a computer and an Internet connection to perform their tasks and submit their work, they don’t need to be in an office down the hall. They can be on the other side of the country, or even in a different country altogether, and still provide the benefits of their skill and talent.

 

According to one study, remote working has grown by 44 percent over the last five years. Around 4.3 million people in the U.S. work from home at least half the time, and 76 percent of respondents said that they wanted to telecommute all the time. Remote workers get a flexible schedule and save commuting time; companies get to hire the best people anywhere in the world and enjoy a 25 percent lower turnover.

 

But remote working isn’t like a more typical in-office environment. The work is performed without a boss present to check work or answer questions. There are no watercooler chats or colleagues to bounce ideas off. And the work hours are whatever the team member wants to create to suit their lifestyle.

 

Find the Right People

 

The first challenge in building a remote team is hiring the right people.

 

Remote workers need the right skills you’re looking for to complete their tasks but they also need to self-manage. They need to be self-motivated, responsible and dedicated. They need to have the mindset of entrepreneurs running their own businesses, even when that business only has one customer and pays them a salary.

 

That’s why a trial period is important to make sure not just that they can do the job but that they can be relied upon to do it—and to do it on time consistently and to be available for communications.

 

Agree on Collaboration Tools

 

As the team grows, you’ll also need to decide how you’re going to work together. Every office is different, and every worker has their own preference. Some might prefer to use Word, others Google Docs. Some might be used to uploading their files to Dropbox, others to Microsoft’s OneDrive.

 

Lisette Sutherland, author of Work Together Anywhere: A Handbook on Working Remotely—Successfully—for Individuals, Teams, and Managers, recommends giving each remote team member an agreement that lists the tools they prefer to use for each type of work and asking how they like to communicate. Team members can say whether they prefer to send quick messages through a chat application like Slack or just use email. They can state how quickly they tend to reply and how often they like to set up a video conference, and which video conferencing software they prefer to use.

 

Each team member will have their preference so it will then be up to the team leader or the employer to review their suggestions and lay out the rules everyone will follow. No one will end up with all their preferences but everyone will understand how the team will work together.

 

You can also set up times to meet in person. Few things help more to bond a long-term team than the ability to occasionally get together and swap ideas. Even if it only happens once or twice a year at a conference, those meetings can help to smooth out work for the year ahead.

 

A remote team is now too valuable a benefit to reject because it’s untraditional. Businesses as large as Basecamp, Automattic, and MySQL are now entirely virtual or close to it. It works, and it means that you can build a successful business with the best team even if you live somewhere remote.

 

About Joel Comm

 

As an Internet pioneer, Joel has been creating profitable websites, software, products, and helping entrepreneurs succeed since 1995. He has Screen+Shot+2019-02-08+at+9.16.44+AM.pngbeen at the frontlines of live video online since 2008 and has a deep expertise in using tools such as Facebook Live, Periscope, Instagram or Snapchat to broadcast a clearly defined message to a receptive audience or leveraging the power of webinar and meeting technologies.

 

Joel is a New York Times best-selling author of 15 books, including “The AdSense Code,” “Click Here to Order: Stories from the World’s Most Successful Entrepreneurs,” “KaChing: How to Run an Online Business that Pays and Pays and Twitter Power 3.0.” He is Co-Host of The Bad Crypto Podcast one of the top crypto-related shows in the world and has spoken before thousands of people around the world and seeks to inspire, equip and entertain.

 

Web: https://joelcomm.com/ or Twitter: @JoelComm

Read more from Joel Comm

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Joel Comm to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Joel Comm is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Joel Comm. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

For any kind of business, the best kind of marketing is word-of-mouth. You want your company to be the subject of conversations. You want people to talk about what you’re doing, what you’re selling and how you’re selling it. The more people hear about you, the more people will buy from you.

allgo-an-app-for-plus-size-people-NWtx_Xe9bjw-unsplash.jpg

Best of all, you have an army of people who have a deep understanding of your business. They like your business… and they each have an untapped audience that would like to know more about your company.

 

According to research by LinkedIn, a typical company’s employees have a network ten times larger than the firm’s social media follower base. LinkedIn found that when businesses ask their employees to share job openings on social media, companies see 30 percent more job applications, and the applicants who arrive through a friend’s recommendation have a 37 percent lower initial attrition rate.

 

Tapping into that network doesn’t just bring better recruits. It can also bring more sales and greater brand recognition. It’s a way to communicate your company’s identity and message to a whole new audience through passionate storytellers who know your company best.

 

To make use of that army of advocates, you’ll need to take three steps:

 

1. Prepare Your Message

 

Urging your employees to talk about work on social media will mean taking a risk. You won’t be able to check every post before it goes out or monitor every conversation that takes place. Micromanaging posts will reduce participation and lower authenticity. You’ll need to trust your workforce to communicate the messages you want to broadcast while still allowing them to be their authentic selves.

 

Before encouraging your staff to advocate on your company’s behalf, draw up guidelines. List your company values. Provide examples of stories that they could share. Make clear that there are some topics—such as customer data or complaints—they shouldn’t discuss. There may even be compliance or legal issues that restrict what people can say. Your employees should be aware of them.

 

Give your team plenty of latitude so that they can have fun, display personality and talk about the things they want to discuss. But do take the time to build a framework so that the conversations they’re having are positive, inviting, and always show the company in a good light.

 

2. Encourage Participation

 

Your company will benefit when your employees are advocating your business to their social media audiences. The employees also benefit by entertaining their followers with fun stories and interesting content. But their rewards should be bigger than that.

 

That doesn’t have to mean compensating employees directly for social content and engagement. Paying employees to be advocates risks authenticity. The best social media content always comes from individuals saying what’s on their minds rather than from professional PR people saying what they’re being paid to repeat.

 

But you can certainly incentivize them through programs like awarding a prize to the employee who lands the highest number of shares or who posts the most content each month. You can also point out that discussing their work on their social media streams can be a path into professional social media work, a channel that you can promote with coaching that benefits both your business and your employees. And you can remind your team that engaging on social media, sharing content, and talking about the issues they encounter in their work builds their own credibility. When they’re thinking professional thoughts aloud online, they look like experts.

 

3. Measure the Results

 

Finally, you should be measuring the results. You should monitor the number of posts your team makes, and the number of shares and likes they receive. Above all, check the impact the content has on your business. You should find that as conversations spread, you see a growth in the number of newsletter subscriptions, more hits on your website, and more orders. Surveys should show a greater degree of brand recognition so that when you launch or offer a new product, you pick up more interest and more sales.

 

Those measures shouldn’t be the only reason you urge your employees to become advocates. A general, positive impression of your business is hard to measure even though it’s still worth having. But it is rewarding to seeing how that advocacy is affecting your bottom line.

 

Your employee networks are a huge, untapped resource. They’re a path towards greater brand recognition and exponential growth. Tapping that resource will take a little training and a lot of trust. But it can bring huge rewards for you, your company, your employees—and your new customers.

 

About Joel Comm

 

As an Internet pioneer, Joel has been creating profitable websites, software, products, and helping entrepreneurs succeed since 1995. He has Screen+Shot+2019-02-08+at+9.16.44+AM.pngbeen at the frontlines of live video online since 2008 and has a deep expertise in using tools such as Facebook Live, Periscope, Instagram or Snapchat to broadcast a clearly defined message to a receptive audience or leveraging the power of webinar and meeting technologies.

 

Joel is a New York Times best-selling author of 15 books, including “The AdSense Code,” “Click Here to Order: Stories from the World’s Most Successful Entrepreneurs,” “KaChing: How to Run an Online Business that Pays and Pays and Twitter Power 3.0.” He is Co-Host of The Bad Crypto Podcast one of the top crypto-related shows in the world and has spoken before thousands of people around the world and seeks to inspire, equip and entertain.

 

Web: https://joelcomm.com/ or Twitter: @JoelComm

Read more from Joel Comm

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Joel Comm to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Joel Comm is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Joel Comm. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

As the holidays approach, your employees may have visions of bonus checks dancing in their heads. But whether or not to give your small business employees a holiday bonus depends on several factors, including your employees’ expectations, your own generosity and your business’s financial situation.

Here’s what to consider when deciding whether to give out bonuses.

 

Meeting Employee Expectations adult-birthday-birthday-gift-box-360624.jpg

 

A previous employer taught me that once you start giving holiday bonuses, you can’t stop. What’s more, you need to keep the bonuses at a comparable level from year to year. If you give everyone a $1,000 cash bonus three years in a row, then suddenly drop to a $25 Starbucks gift card the fourth, you won’t win any fans among your staff.

If this is the first year you will be giving employee bonuses, set reasonable expectations. Even if your business is having a great year, huge bonuses can set a bar you may not be able to meet going forward.

 

Consider starting with a small, base bonus you feel confident you can continue offering in the coming years. Then add extras, such as gift cards or holiday turkeys, depending on company performance.

 

How to Give Holiday Bonuses

 

While performance bonuses are often reserved for managers, holiday bonuses should be given to everyone. If you feel certain levels of workers deserve bigger bonuses, you should still make the amount consistent. For example, you could give everyone a cash bonus that’s a percentage of their salary or equivalent to a week’s pay.

Unlike performance-based bonuses, holiday bonuses should have no strings attached. They’re simply a gesture of goodwill and a way to spread holiday cheer.

If you do give out performance-based bonuses, consider doing so in January to keep them separate from holiday bonuses.

 

What to Give as a Holiday Bonus

 

There are several options for holiday bonuses; consider one or a combination of these.

 

  • Cash: Cash is king for the holiday bonus. Everyone can use cash and employees will appreciate a little extra help paying for holiday gifts. 29% of business owners look forward to providing employees holiday perks or bonuses says BofA’s 2019 Fall Small Business Owner Spotlight.
  • Gift cards: When giving gift cards as part of your bonuses, look for those that appeal to the widest possible audience. For example, everyone needs to buy food, so grocery store gift cards are a good bet. Gift cards to Amazon, Target or similar major retailers are also likely to be appreciated. You may be able get gift cards at a discount online or at membership discount stores.
  • Time off: If your budget, industry, and business allow for it, consider closing your office the week before New Year’s while still paying employee salaries. Your team will come back rested and ready to work. If that’s not realistic, giving employees a day or two off with pay, or letting them leave early on Fridays during December, is a nice reward to help them manage their holiday schedules.

 

Giving a holiday party or giving employees gifts are nice gestures, but they don’t really replace the holiday bonus. A party is more of a group celebration, and gifts may miss the mark. A holiday bonus, in contrast, is sure to be appreciated.

 

How do you plan to reward your employees this holiday season?

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Whether you’re a retailer, a manufacturer or own a seasonal business such as a ski resort, now is the time you may need more hands to meet seasonal customer demand. For example, retail job openings typically start accelerating in early September and peak in mid-October, according to job search site Glassdoor.

 

Yet if hiring has already peaked, does that mean all the best employees are already taken? No. If you still need seasonal workers despite the late date, follow these steps to find them. women-s-white-collared-long-sleeved-shirt-3170928.jpg

 

Make your jobs more appealing

 

It’s a job seeker's market, and lots of companies are competing for seasonal workers. Thanks to a strong economy and optimistic holiday sales projections, Glassdoor expects seasonal holiday hiring to rise by about 4% compared to last year. Target, UPS, Amazon and Kohl’s are just a few of the big companies hiring seasonal employees, and they’re offering good pay and perks to attract workers.

 

Start by making sure your pay is competitive. If earning holiday pay and overtime are options for your seasonal workers, promote that too. Highlight any perks, such as performance bonuses, employee discounts or flexible hours. Are you looking for workers who can stay on after the holidays? Then promote the opportunity to transition to full-time work.

 

Ask your existing employees to spread the word

 

Desirable employees tend to have friends with similar habits and work ethics. Let your employees know that you’re looking for seasonal workers. Consider offering a referral bonus if an employee refers someone you end up hiring.

 

Reach out to previous seasonal employees

 

Go back to your employment records to find some of your top seasonal workers from years past. Contact them to see if they’re looking for work again.

 

Get social

 

Loyal customers can be great employees, so use your social media accounts and your website to let people know you’re hiring. Also spread the word on community-based social media sites such as NextDoor or your town’s Facebook group. People often turn to community sites for leads on jobs.

 

Give them a sign

 

It’s old fashioned, but it still works: Put up a sign to let people know you’re hiring. My local Target and Kohl’s both have big sandwich boards out front advertising seasonal jobs, with a number to text for more information. You can do the same. Do you have delivery vehicles or company cars? Put magnetic signage advertising you’re hiring on the vehicles.

 

Think outside the box

Teenagers and college students aren’t your only resource for seasonal workers. Stay-at-home moms and retirees often want to earn extra money around the holidays. Advertise on job sites that specialize in these markets such as RetireeWorkforce, Workforce50, Women’s Job List or FlexJobs. Snag is a popular job search site specializing in hourly workers. You can also contact local groups catering to those demographics, such as retiree groups, PTAs or parents’ groups, and let them know you’re looking for seasonal workers.

 

Consider a staffing agency

 

When your business is hitting its busy season, writing and placing job ads and scanning responses is the last thing you have time for. Outsourcing to a staffing agency specializing in temporary workers takes these headaches off your hands. You will pay more for these employees since the staffing agency will take a cut. However, you’ll save time and can rest assured the staffing agency has handled background checks, references and other steps involved in finding qualified candidates who can hit the ground running.

 

Finding qualified seasonal employees can be a big challenge for a small business. By taking these steps to widen your search, you’ll find the workers you need so you can benefit from all that the busy season has to offer.

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Finding a new hire for your small business is challenging while finding the right hire is even more difficult.

 

A great team is what creates a great business. That's why asking the right questions during the interview process is critical.

 

Here are the top five questions to consider to find the perfect candidate for your business:

 

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  1. Why did you choose to leave your past employer? Knowing the reasons why a candidate left a job will show if they’re well suited and can thrive in your company’s work environment.
  2. Why do you want to work here? This will show how much time and research the candidate put into preparing for the interview and whether their career aspirations align with your company. But asking this question requires you to know exactly what it is you want in an employee and what the job will entail. You can’t find the perfect employee if you haven’t clearly defined the job.
  3. Do you perform the best working in teams or alone? This question will determine how the candidate prefers to work and can be a clue as to what kind of teammate they will be. After all, someone who enjoys solitary work and long stretches of uninterrupted time at their desk may not thrive in a position that requires collaboration or multi-tasking.
  4. What are the two most satisfying accomplishments in your career? Tell me about each. According to Glassdoor, asking about an important career achievement gives you a look into their values and what has had an impact on them. Knowing the values of an employee is crucial in running a successful business. Businesses are not monolithic. They are made up of people – people who do business with other people. So, having similar values creates a smooth and productive working environment.
  5. Do you have any questions for me? Time to see if they’ve been paying attention! Someone who has been paying close attention to you and to the flow of the interview will come up with a question to further enrich the conversation.  Not to mention, a candidate who is passionate about the position and is interested in the company will certainly have a question or two.

 

Related Articles:

Do you attract great employees?

 

Watch Bank of America Merchant Services’ “Works like a charm” hiring webinar to find out how.

 

“Works like a charm: Learn how to hire and retain great staff” was created to help small businesses tackle one of the most time-consuming tasks you can face, employee management. With unemployment at its lowest level in decades and new trends in online applications, these hiring and retention best practices can help give you a leg up on employee management.

 

Key topics covered in the webinar include:

  • Hiring in the digital age
  • Using tools and strategies to retain excellent employees
  • Empowering your employees

 

To watch the replay, click here.

What can your business do to ensure your workplace is friendly to the women in your workforce?

 

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InHerSight, a website that allows women to anonymously rate how female-friendly their workplaces are, collected data on what makes an ideal work environment for women. These are the top four qualities for a female-friendly work environment:

 

1. Paid time off: Even as society works toward a more equitable division of labor in the office and at home, providing paid time off is critical for women to know that their workplace values their responsibilities outside of the their job. Paid time off allows employees to take a sick day without stress, to stay at home with a sick child if needed, or simply to ensure  vacation time with the kids.

 

Paid time off also includes paid maternity leave. For businesses with 50 employees or more, the federal Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides “up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a 12-month period to care for a newborn, adopted or foster child, or to care for a family member, or to attend to the employee’s own serious medical health condition.”

 

The FMLA rules may not cover your small business, but even so, giving female employees a paid maternity leave shows your commitment to their well-being and acknowledges the many stresses and complications that can come with building a family. And when your business cares for its workers, they will care for you.

 

2. Salary satisfaction: One of the key work issues for women is closing the gender pay gap, i.e., where men who have the same job titles as women are paid higher salaries. For women to know that their time is just as valuable and they are doing their jobs well as their male counterparts, you must make sure that a gender pay gap doesn’t exist in your company.

 

3. Culture: Due to historical power imbalances in the professional space, women often are focused on an office culture and how employees and management treat each other. According to the InHerSight survey, this includes being treated in “respectful, professional, and unbiased” ways. There are several different types of policies in the office you can set up in order to make this happen. They include:

 

a) Zero-tolerance harassment policies. To ensure women feel supported by management, creating a zero-tolerance policy toward any type of harassment is critical. This allows all employees to know they can be in an office environment where they can be free of any fear of verbal or sexual harassment while they work.

 

b) Bias training. Women often experience gender bias in the workplace, where their skills and knowledge are second-guessed. Workplace discrimination based on sex is a huge barrier to women feeling comfortable in the office, so training your workforce on how to avoid gender bias is crucial in creating a good workplace culture.

 

c) Mentorship programs. Women often have a more difficult time being recruited or promoted in the office. Mentorship programs, by women and for women, allow for those in senior positions to help women below them ask questions, get guidance, and further their careers with the help of someone who has been there.

 

4. Flex-time: Allowing  flexible work hours is a great way to make your office attractive to new employees and current ones alike. Instead of everyone working a required 9 - 5, letting employees work later on some days and leave earlier on others provides flexibility many appreciate.

 

Working remotely is another perk to help working parents spend more time with their families.

 

At the end of the day, none of these policies are difficult to implement  and  would be very welcome by your team.

 

Check out our Spotlight on Women Entrepreneurs for a collection of articles highlighting how to embrace the unique challenges women face and thrive as small business owners.

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

How do you go from small to big, or if not big, then at least bigger?

 

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That question vexes many a small business person. Is it a matter of simply executing a good plan? Yes, but it’s more than that. Is it having a great idea? Partially. A better mousetrap? Maybe, sometimes.

 

But really, it is more than that, and simpler.

 

For any business to scale and get bigger, the journey begins with a single employee. Indeed, if you are going to grow, you need help, period. A great team is what creates a great business.

 

Here’s how to effectively hire that first person:

 

1. Plan: Probably the hardest part for solopreneurs is giving up control. Often it is not that they don't want to share the power, but rather, they just don’t know how. Figuring out what to let go of is a challenge.

 

The secret is to sit down, make a list of those things that you do which mustbe done by you (client acquisition for instance) and which things can and should be done by someone else (sales for example.) Then make a list of what the new person will do.

 

Then figure out how much you can pay the person, what their hours will be, where and how they will work, and what all of their other duties will be. Create a written job description.

 

2. Cast your net: Let your network know you are looking to hire and post the job description on job sites and even local colleges. This will ensure that you get a wide variety of applicants.

 

Learn the best sources for hiring talent, according to Rieva Lesonsky

 

3. Sort: Of course, you want someone with experience and smarts, but think outside the box a bit too. What elseis important to you? Is it skills, personality, connections or what? Pick people to interview who seem great, but who also may intrigue you just because.

 

4. Interview: Look for people who have the skills, smarts, background and experience, and with whom you connect. Ask yourself: Would I like to spend 8 hours a day with them?

 

5. Make it legal: Make sure you have an Employer Identification Number from the IRS. All employers must have one.

 

Next, have your attorney draft an employment contract. Be sure your contract states that the employee is “at-will” – meaning they can be fired at any time for any legal reason – so that there is no implied long-term promise of employment.

 

You also need to set up payroll. Will you do it by hand (the least expensive) or hire a service (the easiest)? How often will you pay them? Also, check with your state labor commission to see what posters you are legally required to hang.

 

6. Fill out the forms: There are plenty of forms you and your new employee must submit:

 

    • Federal law says you must report new employees within 20 days of hiring them. State laws might be shorter.
    • Each employee must fill out Form W-4.
    • If you work in a state with income tax, they need to also fill out a form for state tax withholding.
    • Also, have them fill out a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, certifying they are legally eligible to work in the United Sates.

 

Good luck, it is a lot of work, but it should be worth it.

 

     Read next:

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Join Bank of America Merchant Services on Oct. 7 or Oct. 8, 2019, to hear about the latest hiring tactics for small businesses. The educational webinar will focus on hiring and retention best practices in the digital age, and will feature industry expert Rebecca Dodgen, People Operations Leader at Homebase.

 

Session topics will include:

  • Hiring in the digital age
  • Using tools and strategies to retain excellent
    employees
  • Empowering your employees
  • Live Q&A with Homebase

 

Date:

Choose from two times. The same content will be covered in both sessions.

 

  • Monday, October 7 from 3 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. ET

 

  • Tuesday, October 8 from 11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.ET

 

To register for the Bank of America Merchant Services “Works like a charm” webinar, click here.

For most business owners, retirement is either a subject they welcome or the last thing they want to think about. If you’re looking forward to that day, you’ve probably already started preparing to move on from your business. 

 

Many privately held companies reflect the people who’ve built them. In some cases, the owner is the business.

 

If you conclude that the company is viable without you there to run it, your next step is to get an accurate valuation of its worth. That is essential not just for  sale, but also in consideration of taxes and to help you gauge how much retirement income you might expect. A professional valuation and tax expert can help you look past your emotional attachment to the company, gauge its true value as well as the market for such a business, and arrive at a realistic number.

 

What Are Your Retirement Income Needs?

 

If you are planning on selling your business, you should determine how much income you will need to support your lifestyle and retirement goals, and what portion of that will come from the sale of the business compared with your investments and other assets. Keep in mind, too, that merely matching your current salary in retirement may not be enough if the business has also been paying for things like health insurance, car leases, club memberships and tax preparation – expenses that you will have to cover yourself.

 

Even after receiving a lump sum from a sale, many former business owners can stay involved and earn income by serving on the board of directors or consulting. You might even continue helping out in day-to-day operations in a reduced but vital role such as serving clients who’ve been with the company for years and are used to working with you.

 

If you own an office building or other physical assets, another option for generating retirement income is to retain those assets and lease or rent them back to the business. Such arrangements need to be agreed upon beforehand and spelled out clearly in the formal transfer or sale agreement with the new majority owners.

 

Bear in mind that there are very real advantages to beginning to prepare for it now.

 

Taking the time to plot your company’s future can ensure that you leave on your own terms. It also puts you in a better position to retain control, at least during any transition period. So that proceeds from your business -which in many cases are your biggest asset- have the greatest potential to provide you with a strong, steady retirement income.

 

How can you supplement Retirement Income?

If the proceeds from the business (sale of the business, physical assets, etc.) aren’t sufficient to cover retirement expenses, there are proactive steps that can be taken today to help reach the future you want, as well as increase employee satisfaction and retention. The first step is to have a conversation around the various Small Business Retirement Plan offerings to see which benefits best suit your employees, business, and yourself.

 

Small Business Retirement Plan offerings

  1. Small Business 401(k)
  2. SEP IRA
  3. SIMPLE IRA

 

Contact Merrill for assistance in choosing the correct Small Business Retirement Plan for your business.

 

Merrill, its affiliates, and financial advisors do not provide legal, tax, or accounting advice. You should consult your legal and/or tax advisors before making any financial decisions.  Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (also referred to as “MLPF&S” or “Merrill”) makes available certain investment products sponsored, managed, distributed or provided by companies that are affiliates of Bank of America Corporation (“BofA Corp.”). MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, Member SIPC and a wholly owned subsidiary of BofA Corp.  Banking products are provided by Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC and a wholly owned subsidiary of BofA Corp.

 

Investment products:

 

Are Not FDIC Insured

Are Not Bank Guaranteed

May Lose Value

 

© 2019 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved.


ARX497S4

I don’t need to tell you that finding and retaining top talent is a challenge in this era of low unemployment. Not only are we small businesses competing for talent against other small businesses, but large corporations as well.

 

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Needless to say, a main way to do it is to offer a good benefits package, and that must include quality healthcare.

 

But offering a good healthcare plan is sometimes easier said than done. As we all know all too well, healthcare costs keep rising, begging the question: How do you keep costs down while still making employees happy and also turning a profit?

 

No small task, that.

 

But it must be done.

 

So, to help you, here are four ways you can reduce your small business healthcare costs.

 

1. Offer a narrower product

 

The essential rule for healthcare costs is that the more options you offer, the more it will cost. As such, it makes sense that narrowing the options in your plan – fewer doctor choices and a tighter network – will help keep costs down.

 

I recently hosted a series of short healthcare podcasts for United Healthcare and one of our shows dealt with this very topic. My guest was a UHC cost specialist, Robert Horton. Robert explained that a narrower network can save an average of 3%, which is not insignificant.

 

2. Offer a high-deductible plan

 

Another option that small business owners utilize quite often is a high deductible plan. A high-deductible healthcare plan (HDHP) is as it sounds – in exchange for lower monthly premiums, the covered employee agrees to pay more out of pocket when the time comes to actually see a doctor. Once the deductible is met for the year, most things are covered; that’s why so many people end up getting expensive tests done late in the calendar year.

 

High deductible plans are good when you have a young and relatively healthy workforce; they care less about the high deductible as they use the coverage lees.

 

While raising the deductible amount is not ideal (none of the ideas are, but that is the state of the system we are in) at least this way you can still offer healthcare coverage.

 

3. Offer a Health Savings Account

 

Health savings accounts are a simple way for small business owners to provide healthcare coverage at a lower cost. HSAs are akin to an IRA or a personal savings account, except that the funds are earmarked for healthcare costs.

 

“A health savings account (HSA) is a pre-tax savings vehicle for people who have high deductible health insurance plans (HDHP) and want to set aside pre-tax dollars to pay for medical expenses. An HSA reduces employees’ out-of-pocket costs and lowers their year-end tax liability. It also reduces employer payroll taxes.”

 

Accordingly, to qualify for an HSA, you must already be enrolled in a HDHP. With an HSA, your payments are tax-free as long as they go towards qualified healthcare associated costs.

 

This type of plan is also really good for the microbusinesses and the self-employed who need more financial flexibility and lower insurance costs. (This is what I use, for example.)

 

4. Offer wellness incentives:

 

Small business owners know what it means to think outside of the box. There is no better way to think outside the box in terms of healthcare-associated costs than by offering wellness incentives.

 

Wellness incentives can be anything ranging from gym membership discounts or incentives for activity like riding a bike to work or bonuses based on proven participation in the wellness programs.

 

A well-designed wellness incentive plan is a win-win for both employers and employees: not only does help employers with healthcare costs (insurance companies look kindly on these sorts of programs), but also, they encourage employees to live well while also promoting a strong company culture.

 

Ultimately, there are many ways for your business to reduce healthcare costs. These are just a few options that might work for your small business.

 

Tackle Employee Mental Health Issues and Your Small Business Will Benefit by Chris Brogan

 

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

The way we communicate and language itself is always in flow. It’s alive. Words and entire methods of talking go in and out of vogue. Slang is naturally an issue because it can change quickly. And almost always, humans. feel like the new generation will be the murderers of clear communication. There are lots of feelings of ageism in both directions. We can’t address communication without considering somewhat generic generational differences.

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What’s changed even more than normal, though, is the velocity of all this.

 

I’m sharing this because it impacts internal and external interactions with your customers, employees, and all of your stakeholders. There are some concrete ways we can embrace some of this change while reinforcing what’s good about the way things typically have been. Let’s look at it all like problems.

 

Problem 1 - No One Teaches This

 

There may or may not be “proper business communication” courses in college, but I’m presuming that if there is it’s not one students are lining up to take. For one, it would be boring. For another, I’d presume it would be years out of date, seeing as language changes all the time.

 

But you can put together a quick “best practices for email” course at work (either in person or even a webcast kind of thing) and help people coming into the company (and refresh existing employees) as to how to better interact. You know, “Subject lines save time” and “How to get someone to answer your questions in fewer emails” and “How not to write an email.”

 

Teach everyone in the company how to start, fill, and stop an email so that it’s useful. Teach how to make and receive a business call, and so on. (If you’re cringing, realize this: it’s much better than the frustration of enduring responses that don’t match the company’s culture.)

 

Problem 2 - We Get Hung Up on the Look and Feel

 

Similar to problem 1, we all have to realize that incoming generations of business professionals were “born and raised” in a mobile-first communications environment. You and I might have been raised by word documents and emails. Newcomers to business started with text messages and tweets. Brief. Simple. And with quickly changing language.

 

If I tell my teenagers something like “One Punch Man needs a new season,” I’ll hear back “ikr” and that’s it. They’ve said, “I know, right?” but that’s not what is actually sent.

 

To the benefit of all parties and around communication, brevity is a great thing. Sending pictures and gifs and emojis is a good thing. It’s not yet all that acceptable in common business interactions, and there probably aren’t all that many legal documents with emoji or memes written into them, but there is a time and a place for them internally.

 

 

Problem 3 - We Hate the Phone

 

“The phone is just a seldom used app... on my phone.” - Gary Gulman

 

Verbal communication has fallen into deep decline, even though it’s still the second most effective way to communicate with another person. There are great times for a phone call. Sales close a lot better with phone support (nothing beats in-person, I know).

 

It’s helpful to teach everyone proper phone etiquette for different types of calls, including internal requests, consensus gathering, and so on. It might also help to train everyone how to use methods other than the phone for interactions. One big drawback to voice communication is that it must be conducted in real time. There are many situations where it’s easier to message someone than to talk via the phone.

 

Problem 4 - Communication Will Forever and Always Be Multi-Channel

 

This has changed and it will never go back: we all use more than one method to reach and interact with people. Think about messaging apps alone. You could text, Skype, Facetime, Slack, or DM someone on any number of social networks. You can use Whatsapp or Signal or Telegram, Line, or WeChat and so on and so on.

 

People now communicate with multiple channels in action. You might send an email, then text a follow up comment, and later switch to the company’s Slack channel to check in with the group. Companies who embrace this method usually get more done (and done faster) compared with those who force formal single-channel methods of interaction. Frustrating as it is (and there are some cool software tools that help mitigate this), this is how people communicate these days.

 

Problem 5 - Only Our Generation is Right

 

I said ageism plays a key role in fixing communications challenges at a company. It’s pretty much the core of all the other problems. Younger people think older people are too formal and stiff. Older people feel that the new generation doesn’t value interaction the same way.

 

Everyone is right and everyone is wrong and none of that matters. Communication is an art more than a straight recipe. There are great parts worth keeping in every communication method. There are parts that aren’t as preferred where people might have to meet in the middle. Every generation has a point of view, but also no generation is all that monolithic, either.

 

The best way to improve communication? Learn to listen more, ask more questions, and work on these “problems.”

 

You don’t, like, have to talk like anyone other than who you are, and it’s always way better to speak in your own diction than to ever try and use modern slang. (Don’t do it. Oh-kerrrr?) (I cringed even writing that.)

 

But DO understand that a much more conversational, visual, brief, and informal communications method is the nature of things. You can’t stay completely rigid and think that anyone finds your company modern or progressive. And yes, you come off as staid and stodgy if you don’t at least attempt to communicate a little less formally these days.

 

It’s not all going to be your cup of kombucha but understand that communication upgrades are business upgrades. If you help your company communicate better internally and externally, everyone benefits.

 

About Chris Brogan

 

chris-brogan-headshot.jpg

Chris Brogan is an author, keynote speaker and business advisor who helps companies update organizational interfaces to better support modern humans. The age of factory-sized interactions is over. We all come one to a pack. And it’s time to accept that we are all a little bit dented. Chris advisesleadership teams to empower team members by sharing actionable insights on talent development. He also works with marketing and communications teams to more effectively reach people who want to be seen and understood before they buy what a company sells.

 

Web: https://chrisbrogan.com Twitter: @ChrisBrogan

Read more from Chris Brogan

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Chris Brogan to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. The third parties within articles are used under license from Chris Brogan. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

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