Skip navigation
1 2 3 Previous Next

Employees

200 posts

Whether you’re a retailer, a manufacturer or own a seasonal business such as a ski resort, now is the time you may need more hands to meet seasonal customer demand. For example, retail job openings typically start accelerating in early September and peak in mid-October, according to job search site Glassdoor.

 

Yet if hiring has already peaked, does that mean all the best employees are already taken? No. If you still need seasonal workers despite the late date, follow these steps to find them. women-s-white-collared-long-sleeved-shirt-3170928.jpg

 

Make your jobs more appealing

 

It’s a job seeker's market, and lots of companies are competing for seasonal workers. Thanks to a strong economy and optimistic holiday sales projections, Glassdoor expects seasonal holiday hiring to rise by about 4% compared to last year. Target, UPS, Amazon and Kohl’s are just a few of the big companies hiring seasonal employees, and they’re offering good pay and perks to attract workers.

 

Start by making sure your pay is competitive. If earning holiday pay and overtime are options for your seasonal workers, promote that too. Highlight any perks, such as performance bonuses, employee discounts or flexible hours. Are you looking for workers who can stay on after the holidays? Then promote the opportunity to transition to full-time work.

 

Ask your existing employees to spread the word

 

Desirable employees tend to have friends with similar habits and work ethics. Let your employees know that you’re looking for seasonal workers. Consider offering a referral bonus if an employee refers someone you end up hiring.

 

Reach out to previous seasonal employees

 

Go back to your employment records to find some of your top seasonal workers from years past. Contact them to see if they’re looking for work again.

 

Get social

 

Loyal customers can be great employees, so use your social media accounts and your website to let people know you’re hiring. Also spread the word on community-based social media sites such as NextDoor or your town’s Facebook group. People often turn to community sites for leads on jobs.

 

Give them a sign

 

It’s old fashioned, but it still works: Put up a sign to let people know you’re hiring. My local Target and Kohl’s both have big sandwich boards out front advertising seasonal jobs, with a number to text for more information. You can do the same. Do you have delivery vehicles or company cars? Put magnetic signage advertising you’re hiring on the vehicles.

 

Think outside the box

Teenagers and college students aren’t your only resource for seasonal workers. Stay-at-home moms and retirees often want to earn extra money around the holidays. Advertise on job sites that specialize in these markets such as RetireeWorkforce, Workforce50, Women’s Job List or FlexJobs. Snag is a popular job search site specializing in hourly workers. You can also contact local groups catering to those demographics, such as retiree groups, PTAs or parents’ groups, and let them know you’re looking for seasonal workers.

 

Consider a staffing agency

 

When your business is hitting its busy season, writing and placing job ads and scanning responses is the last thing you have time for. Outsourcing to a staffing agency specializing in temporary workers takes these headaches off your hands. You will pay more for these employees since the staffing agency will take a cut. However, you’ll save time and can rest assured the staffing agency has handled background checks, references and other steps involved in finding qualified candidates who can hit the ground running.

 

Finding qualified seasonal employees can be a big challenge for a small business. By taking these steps to widen your search, you’ll find the workers you need so you can benefit from all that the busy season has to offer.

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Finding a new hire for your small business is challenging while finding the right hire is even more difficult.

 

A great team is what creates a great business. That's why asking the right questions during the interview process is critical.

 

Here are the top five questions to consider to find the perfect candidate for your business:

 

woman-wearing-blue-top-beside-table-1181712.jpg

  1. Why did you choose to leave your past employer? Knowing the reasons why a candidate left a job will show if they’re well suited and can thrive in your company’s work environment.
  2. Why do you want to work here? This will show how much time and research the candidate put into preparing for the interview and whether their career aspirations align with your company. But asking this question requires you to know exactly what it is you want in an employee and what the job will entail. You can’t find the perfect employee if you haven’t clearly defined the job.
  3. Do you perform the best working in teams or alone? This question will determine how the candidate prefers to work and can be a clue as to what kind of teammate they will be. After all, someone who enjoys solitary work and long stretches of uninterrupted time at their desk may not thrive in a position that requires collaboration or multi-tasking.
  4. What are the two most satisfying accomplishments in your career? Tell me about each. According to Glassdoor, asking about an important career achievement gives you a look into their values and what has had an impact on them. Knowing the values of an employee is crucial in running a successful business. Businesses are not monolithic. They are made up of people – people who do business with other people. So, having similar values creates a smooth and productive working environment.
  5. Do you have any questions for me? Time to see if they’ve been paying attention! Someone who has been paying close attention to you and to the flow of the interview will come up with a question to further enrich the conversation.  Not to mention, a candidate who is passionate about the position and is interested in the company will certainly have a question or two.

 

Related Articles:

Do you attract great employees?

 

Watch Bank of America Merchant Services’ “Works like a charm” hiring webinar to find out how.

 

“Works like a charm: Learn how to hire and retain great staff” was created to help small businesses tackle one of the most time-consuming tasks you can face, employee management. With unemployment at its lowest level in decades and new trends in online applications, these hiring and retention best practices can help give you a leg up on employee management.

 

Key topics covered in the webinar include:

  • Hiring in the digital age
  • Using tools and strategies to retain excellent employees
  • Empowering your employees

 

To watch the replay, click here.

What can your business do to ensure your workplace is friendly to the women in your workforce?

 

adult-business-computer-2422293.jpg

InHerSight, a website that allows women to anonymously rate how female-friendly their workplaces are, collected data on what makes an ideal work environment for women. These are the top four qualities for a female-friendly work environment:

 

1. Paid time off: Even as society works toward a more equitable division of labor in the office and at home, providing paid time off is critical for women to know that their workplace values their responsibilities outside of the their job. Paid time off allows employees to take a sick day without stress, to stay at home with a sick child if needed, or simply to ensure  vacation time with the kids.

 

Paid time off also includes paid maternity leave. For businesses with 50 employees or more, the federal Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides “up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a 12-month period to care for a newborn, adopted or foster child, or to care for a family member, or to attend to the employee’s own serious medical health condition.”

 

The FMLA rules may not cover your small business, but even so, giving female employees a paid maternity leave shows your commitment to their well-being and acknowledges the many stresses and complications that can come with building a family. And when your business cares for its workers, they will care for you.

 

2. Salary satisfaction: One of the key work issues for women is closing the gender pay gap, i.e., where men who have the same job titles as women are paid higher salaries. For women to know that their time is just as valuable and they are doing their jobs well as their male counterparts, you must make sure that a gender pay gap doesn’t exist in your company.

 

3. Culture: Due to historical power imbalances in the professional space, women often are focused on an office culture and how employees and management treat each other. According to the InHerSight survey, this includes being treated in “respectful, professional, and unbiased” ways. There are several different types of policies in the office you can set up in order to make this happen. They include:

 

a) Zero-tolerance harassment policies. To ensure women feel supported by management, creating a zero-tolerance policy toward any type of harassment is critical. This allows all employees to know they can be in an office environment where they can be free of any fear of verbal or sexual harassment while they work.

 

b) Bias training. Women often experience gender bias in the workplace, where their skills and knowledge are second-guessed. Workplace discrimination based on sex is a huge barrier to women feeling comfortable in the office, so training your workforce on how to avoid gender bias is crucial in creating a good workplace culture.

 

c) Mentorship programs. Women often have a more difficult time being recruited or promoted in the office. Mentorship programs, by women and for women, allow for those in senior positions to help women below them ask questions, get guidance, and further their careers with the help of someone who has been there.

 

4. Flex-time: Allowing  flexible work hours is a great way to make your office attractive to new employees and current ones alike. Instead of everyone working a required 9 - 5, letting employees work later on some days and leave earlier on others provides flexibility many appreciate.

 

Working remotely is another perk to help working parents spend more time with their families.

 

At the end of the day, none of these policies are difficult to implement  and  would be very welcome by your team.

 

Check out our Spotlight on Women Entrepreneurs for a collection of articles highlighting how to embrace the unique challenges women face and thrive as small business owners.

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

How do you go from small to big, or if not big, then at least bigger?

 

free-to-use-sounds-kOuCX7fh50U-unsplash.jpg

That question vexes many a small business person. Is it a matter of simply executing a good plan? Yes, but it’s more than that. Is it having a great idea? Partially. A better mousetrap? Maybe, sometimes.

 

But really, it is more than that, and simpler.

 

For any business to scale and get bigger, the journey begins with a single employee. Indeed, if you are going to grow, you need help, period. A great team is what creates a great business.

 

Here’s how to effectively hire that first person:

 

1. Plan: Probably the hardest part for solopreneurs is giving up control. Often it is not that they don't want to share the power, but rather, they just don’t know how. Figuring out what to let go of is a challenge.

 

The secret is to sit down, make a list of those things that you do which mustbe done by you (client acquisition for instance) and which things can and should be done by someone else (sales for example.) Then make a list of what the new person will do.

 

Then figure out how much you can pay the person, what their hours will be, where and how they will work, and what all of their other duties will be. Create a written job description.

 

2. Cast your net: Let your network know you are looking to hire and post the job description on job sites and even local colleges. This will ensure that you get a wide variety of applicants.

 

Learn the best sources for hiring talent, according to Rieva Lesonsky

 

3. Sort: Of course, you want someone with experience and smarts, but think outside the box a bit too. What elseis important to you? Is it skills, personality, connections or what? Pick people to interview who seem great, but who also may intrigue you just because.

 

4. Interview: Look for people who have the skills, smarts, background and experience, and with whom you connect. Ask yourself: Would I like to spend 8 hours a day with them?

 

5. Make it legal: Make sure you have an Employer Identification Number from the IRS. All employers must have one.

 

Next, have your attorney draft an employment contract. Be sure your contract states that the employee is “at-will” – meaning they can be fired at any time for any legal reason – so that there is no implied long-term promise of employment.

 

You also need to set up payroll. Will you do it by hand (the least expensive) or hire a service (the easiest)? How often will you pay them? Also, check with your state labor commission to see what posters you are legally required to hang.

 

6. Fill out the forms: There are plenty of forms you and your new employee must submit:

 

    • Federal law says you must report new employees within 20 days of hiring them. State laws might be shorter.
    • Each employee must fill out Form W-4.
    • If you work in a state with income tax, they need to also fill out a form for state tax withholding.
    • Also, have them fill out a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, certifying they are legally eligible to work in the United Sates.

 

Good luck, it is a lot of work, but it should be worth it.

 

     Read next:

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Join Bank of America Merchant Services on Oct. 7 or Oct. 8, 2019, to hear about the latest hiring tactics for small businesses. The educational webinar will focus on hiring and retention best practices in the digital age, and will feature industry expert Rebecca Dodgen, People Operations Leader at Homebase.

 

Session topics will include:

  • Hiring in the digital age
  • Using tools and strategies to retain excellent
    employees
  • Empowering your employees
  • Live Q&A with Homebase

 

Date:

Choose from two times. The same content will be covered in both sessions.

 

  • Monday, October 7 from 3 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. ET

 

  • Tuesday, October 8 from 11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.ET

 

To register for the Bank of America Merchant Services “Works like a charm” webinar, click here.

For most business owners, retirement is either a subject they welcome or the last thing they want to think about. If you’re looking forward to that day, you’ve probably already started preparing to move on from your business. 

 

Many privately held companies reflect the people who’ve built them. In some cases, the owner is the business.

 

If you conclude that the company is viable without you there to run it, your next step is to get an accurate valuation of its worth. That is essential not just for  sale, but also in consideration of taxes and to help you gauge how much retirement income you might expect. A professional valuation and tax expert can help you look past your emotional attachment to the company, gauge its true value as well as the market for such a business, and arrive at a realistic number.

 

What Are Your Retirement Income Needs?

 

If you are planning on selling your business, you should determine how much income you will need to support your lifestyle and retirement goals, and what portion of that will come from the sale of the business compared with your investments and other assets. Keep in mind, too, that merely matching your current salary in retirement may not be enough if the business has also been paying for things like health insurance, car leases, club memberships and tax preparation – expenses that you will have to cover yourself.

 

Even after receiving a lump sum from a sale, many former business owners can stay involved and earn income by serving on the board of directors or consulting. You might even continue helping out in day-to-day operations in a reduced but vital role such as serving clients who’ve been with the company for years and are used to working with you.

 

If you own an office building or other physical assets, another option for generating retirement income is to retain those assets and lease or rent them back to the business. Such arrangements need to be agreed upon beforehand and spelled out clearly in the formal transfer or sale agreement with the new majority owners.

 

Bear in mind that there are very real advantages to beginning to prepare for it now.

 

Taking the time to plot your company’s future can ensure that you leave on your own terms. It also puts you in a better position to retain control, at least during any transition period. So that proceeds from your business -which in many cases are your biggest asset- have the greatest potential to provide you with a strong, steady retirement income.

 

How can you supplement Retirement Income?

If the proceeds from the business (sale of the business, physical assets, etc.) aren’t sufficient to cover retirement expenses, there are proactive steps that can be taken today to help reach the future you want, as well as increase employee satisfaction and retention. The first step is to have a conversation around the various Small Business Retirement Plan offerings to see which benefits best suit your employees, business, and yourself.

 

Small Business Retirement Plan offerings

  1. Small Business 401(k)
  2. SEP IRA
  3. SIMPLE IRA

 

Contact Merrill for assistance in choosing the correct Small Business Retirement Plan for your business.

 

Merrill, its affiliates, and financial advisors do not provide legal, tax, or accounting advice. You should consult your legal and/or tax advisors before making any financial decisions.  Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (also referred to as “MLPF&S” or “Merrill”) makes available certain investment products sponsored, managed, distributed or provided by companies that are affiliates of Bank of America Corporation (“BofA Corp.”). MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, Member SIPC and a wholly owned subsidiary of BofA Corp.  Banking products are provided by Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC and a wholly owned subsidiary of BofA Corp.

 

Investment products:

 

Are Not FDIC Insured

Are Not Bank Guaranteed

May Lose Value

 

© 2019 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved.


ARX497S4

I don’t need to tell you that finding and retaining top talent is a challenge in this era of low unemployment. Not only are we small businesses competing for talent against other small businesses, but large corporations as well.

 

adult-career-clipboard-1919236.jpg

Needless to say, a main way to do it is to offer a good benefits package, and that must include quality healthcare.

 

But offering a good healthcare plan is sometimes easier said than done. As we all know all too well, healthcare costs keep rising, begging the question: How do you keep costs down while still making employees happy and also turning a profit?

 

No small task, that.

 

But it must be done.

 

So, to help you, here are four ways you can reduce your small business healthcare costs.

 

1. Offer a narrower product

 

The essential rule for healthcare costs is that the more options you offer, the more it will cost. As such, it makes sense that narrowing the options in your plan – fewer doctor choices and a tighter network – will help keep costs down.

 

I recently hosted a series of short healthcare podcasts for United Healthcare and one of our shows dealt with this very topic. My guest was a UHC cost specialist, Robert Horton. Robert explained that a narrower network can save an average of 3%, which is not insignificant.

 

2. Offer a high-deductible plan

 

Another option that small business owners utilize quite often is a high deductible plan. A high-deductible healthcare plan (HDHP) is as it sounds – in exchange for lower monthly premiums, the covered employee agrees to pay more out of pocket when the time comes to actually see a doctor. Once the deductible is met for the year, most things are covered; that’s why so many people end up getting expensive tests done late in the calendar year.

 

High deductible plans are good when you have a young and relatively healthy workforce; they care less about the high deductible as they use the coverage lees.

 

While raising the deductible amount is not ideal (none of the ideas are, but that is the state of the system we are in) at least this way you can still offer healthcare coverage.

 

3. Offer a Health Savings Account

 

Health savings accounts are a simple way for small business owners to provide healthcare coverage at a lower cost. HSAs are akin to an IRA or a personal savings account, except that the funds are earmarked for healthcare costs.

 

“A health savings account (HSA) is a pre-tax savings vehicle for people who have high deductible health insurance plans (HDHP) and want to set aside pre-tax dollars to pay for medical expenses. An HSA reduces employees’ out-of-pocket costs and lowers their year-end tax liability. It also reduces employer payroll taxes.”

 

Accordingly, to qualify for an HSA, you must already be enrolled in a HDHP. With an HSA, your payments are tax-free as long as they go towards qualified healthcare associated costs.

 

This type of plan is also really good for the microbusinesses and the self-employed who need more financial flexibility and lower insurance costs. (This is what I use, for example.)

 

4. Offer wellness incentives:

 

Small business owners know what it means to think outside of the box. There is no better way to think outside the box in terms of healthcare-associated costs than by offering wellness incentives.

 

Wellness incentives can be anything ranging from gym membership discounts or incentives for activity like riding a bike to work or bonuses based on proven participation in the wellness programs.

 

A well-designed wellness incentive plan is a win-win for both employers and employees: not only does help employers with healthcare costs (insurance companies look kindly on these sorts of programs), but also, they encourage employees to live well while also promoting a strong company culture.

 

Ultimately, there are many ways for your business to reduce healthcare costs. These are just a few options that might work for your small business.

 

Tackle Employee Mental Health Issues and Your Small Business Will Benefit by Chris Brogan

 

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

The way we communicate and language itself is always in flow. It’s alive. Words and entire methods of talking go in and out of vogue. Slang is naturally an issue because it can change quickly. And almost always, humans. feel like the new generation will be the murderers of clear communication. There are lots of feelings of ageism in both directions. We can’t address communication without considering somewhat generic generational differences.

backlit-bonding-casual-708392.jpg

 

What’s changed even more than normal, though, is the velocity of all this.

 

I’m sharing this because it impacts internal and external interactions with your customers, employees, and all of your stakeholders. There are some concrete ways we can embrace some of this change while reinforcing what’s good about the way things typically have been. Let’s look at it all like problems.

 

Problem 1 - No One Teaches This

 

There may or may not be “proper business communication” courses in college, but I’m presuming that if there is it’s not one students are lining up to take. For one, it would be boring. For another, I’d presume it would be years out of date, seeing as language changes all the time.

 

But you can put together a quick “best practices for email” course at work (either in person or even a webcast kind of thing) and help people coming into the company (and refresh existing employees) as to how to better interact. You know, “Subject lines save time” and “How to get someone to answer your questions in fewer emails” and “How not to write an email.”

 

Teach everyone in the company how to start, fill, and stop an email so that it’s useful. Teach how to make and receive a business call, and so on. (If you’re cringing, realize this: it’s much better than the frustration of enduring responses that don’t match the company’s culture.)

 

Problem 2 - We Get Hung Up on the Look and Feel

 

Similar to problem 1, we all have to realize that incoming generations of business professionals were “born and raised” in a mobile-first communications environment. You and I might have been raised by word documents and emails. Newcomers to business started with text messages and tweets. Brief. Simple. And with quickly changing language.

 

If I tell my teenagers something like “One Punch Man needs a new season,” I’ll hear back “ikr” and that’s it. They’ve said, “I know, right?” but that’s not what is actually sent.

 

To the benefit of all parties and around communication, brevity is a great thing. Sending pictures and gifs and emojis is a good thing. It’s not yet all that acceptable in common business interactions, and there probably aren’t all that many legal documents with emoji or memes written into them, but there is a time and a place for them internally.

 

 

Problem 3 - We Hate the Phone

 

“The phone is just a seldom used app... on my phone.” - Gary Gulman

 

Verbal communication has fallen into deep decline, even though it’s still the second most effective way to communicate with another person. There are great times for a phone call. Sales close a lot better with phone support (nothing beats in-person, I know).

 

It’s helpful to teach everyone proper phone etiquette for different types of calls, including internal requests, consensus gathering, and so on. It might also help to train everyone how to use methods other than the phone for interactions. One big drawback to voice communication is that it must be conducted in real time. There are many situations where it’s easier to message someone than to talk via the phone.

 

Problem 4 - Communication Will Forever and Always Be Multi-Channel

 

This has changed and it will never go back: we all use more than one method to reach and interact with people. Think about messaging apps alone. You could text, Skype, Facetime, Slack, or DM someone on any number of social networks. You can use Whatsapp or Signal or Telegram, Line, or WeChat and so on and so on.

 

People now communicate with multiple channels in action. You might send an email, then text a follow up comment, and later switch to the company’s Slack channel to check in with the group. Companies who embrace this method usually get more done (and done faster) compared with those who force formal single-channel methods of interaction. Frustrating as it is (and there are some cool software tools that help mitigate this), this is how people communicate these days.

 

Problem 5 - Only Our Generation is Right

 

I said ageism plays a key role in fixing communications challenges at a company. It’s pretty much the core of all the other problems. Younger people think older people are too formal and stiff. Older people feel that the new generation doesn’t value interaction the same way.

 

Everyone is right and everyone is wrong and none of that matters. Communication is an art more than a straight recipe. There are great parts worth keeping in every communication method. There are parts that aren’t as preferred where people might have to meet in the middle. Every generation has a point of view, but also no generation is all that monolithic, either.

 

The best way to improve communication? Learn to listen more, ask more questions, and work on these “problems.”

 

You don’t, like, have to talk like anyone other than who you are, and it’s always way better to speak in your own diction than to ever try and use modern slang. (Don’t do it. Oh-kerrrr?) (I cringed even writing that.)

 

But DO understand that a much more conversational, visual, brief, and informal communications method is the nature of things. You can’t stay completely rigid and think that anyone finds your company modern or progressive. And yes, you come off as staid and stodgy if you don’t at least attempt to communicate a little less formally these days.

 

It’s not all going to be your cup of kombucha but understand that communication upgrades are business upgrades. If you help your company communicate better internally and externally, everyone benefits.

 

About Chris Brogan

 

chris-brogan-headshot.jpg

Chris Brogan is an author, keynote speaker and business advisor who helps companies update organizational interfaces to better support modern humans. The age of factory-sized interactions is over. We all come one to a pack. And it’s time to accept that we are all a little bit dented. Chris advisesleadership teams to empower team members by sharing actionable insights on talent development. He also works with marketing and communications teams to more effectively reach people who want to be seen and understood before they buy what a company sells.

 

Web: https://chrisbrogan.com Twitter: @ChrisBrogan

Read more from Chris Brogan

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Chris Brogan to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. The third parties within articles are used under license from Chris Brogan. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Before we can do amazing work with the people we most want to serve, we need our employees to feel appreciated and supported. Let’s talk about something on their plate that needs addressing.

adult-blur-businessman-927022.jpg

 

There’s a new challenge to most businesses, and that’s the mental wellbeing of employees.  We don’t talk about it much, yet with the advent of mobile devices, our home stress comes with us to work and our problems at the office find their way to our houses.

 

First off, very few people want to self-identify as dealing with mental health issues. But that doesn’t mean they’re not present. According to surveys like the World Health Organization’s 2017 workplace report, 1 in 5 adults experience mental illness in a given year.

 

How can we help? And should we help?

 

Probably the most important ways managers and leaders and coworkers can make the workplace more navigable for people dealing with mental health challenges is to normalize talking about it.“Wow, I’ve been dealing with some stuff at home and it’s really got my anxiety levels up high.”

 

The key is to do more “I” talking than “you” talking. No one wants to hear, “You sure look stressed.” But if you say, “I’ve been slogging through depression lately. I’ve got to chunk up my day better,” that opens people to say, “Oh wow. Need me to listen?”

 

Chunk up assignments, projects, and everyday work with more checkpoints. One issue when mental health challenges happen is that everything feels a bit more daunting, more of a grind. Even if the deadline is the same, adding more checkpoints means that incremental progress is acknowledged and easier to reference. Sometimes, just knowing you’re getting work done helps reduce stress and anxiety.

 

Add a Reset Button

 

My best advice for helping is to install more “reset buttons.”At work, we get wound up sometimes. Deadlines, tough meetings, conflicting client needs can all contribute to a ratcheting feeling of intense emotions.

 

Culture improves immensely when you build the practice of reset buttons into place. The moment we see a little distress and energy in a person or a conversation, maybe say, “Maybe we can hit the reset button for a second.”

 

If everyone agrees, it’s a moment to stop talking, take a breath (or four) and reset the moment. How many times have you felt really ratcheted up in a moment but it’s just temporary? That’s what this helps.

 

Empathy Drives Amazing Business

 

If you work to help employees have a better environment for managing stress, anxiety and depression, that will result in better work performance and less absenteeism. Sure, this isn’t a quick “write better subject lines” fix or a piece of software to change the business, but is that what will earn you better employees and the best customers?

 

Help your employees feel heard, understood and nurtured, and you’ll have the best customer advocates in the world.

 

 

About Chris Brogan

 

chris-brogan-headshot.jpg

Chris Brogan is an author, keynote speaker and business advisor who helps companies update organizational interfaces to better support modern humans. The age of factory-sized interactions is over. We all come one to a pack. And it’s time to accept that we are all a little bit dented. Chris advisesleadership teams to empower team members by sharing actionable insights on talent development. He also works with marketing and communications teams to more effectively reach people who want to be seen and understood before they buy what a company sells.

 

Web: https://chrisbrogan.com Twitter: @ChrisBrogan

Read more from Chris Brogan

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Chris Brogan to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. The third parties within articles are used under license from Chris Brogan. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Take it from me, a CEO with a staff of two—no matter how few employees you have, there’s room to delegate.

 

If you use delegation strategically, your employees will gain needed experience and your business will be better off. Of course, not every task you delegate will be fun (someone has to answerall those emails). However, in addition to rote assignments, be sure to include some more challenging work that allows employees to stretch their capacities.

adult-brainstorming-business-1181622.jpg

 

I know, I know—you don’t want to give up any aspect of your “baby.” But delegation has many benefits for a small business owner:

 

  • It hones your leadership skills. If you don’t delegate, you’re not really the boss—you’re just an employee.
  • It expands your employees’ skills, enhancing their value to your business and their job satisfaction.
  • It frees up your time for long-range planning, innovation, business development, and other big-picture tasks.
  • It reduces your stress so you’re more effective and productive.

 

Follow these steps to get started.

 

Step 1: Choose duties to delegate

 

Make a list of the duties you’d like to pass on to your team. These could include:

 

    • Administrative tasks: Your time is too valuable to spend scheduling meetings, ordering office supplies, or booking travel arrangements.
    • Tasks you’re not good at: For example, my business is a lot better off if I’m not the one managing the books.
    • Tasks you hate doing: We tend to procrastinate on things we dread, which can hurt our businesses.
    • Tasks your employees are interested in: Find out what skills your employees want to learn that can help your business.

Step 2: Create a delegation plan

 

Once you’ve identified possible tasks to delegate, talk to your employees and create a game plan. If you delegate haphazardly or just hand off busywork, your employees won’t learn from the experience—they’ll just resent you.

 

If you’re nervous about handing off a task, ease yourself in by delegating just part of the job. For example, suppose your work involves gathering information, writing proposals, and creating sales presentations. Delegate the research to an employee and keep writing the proposals yourself. Or do the research and writing, then put an employee in charge of “jazzing it up” in a presentation. Starting small will help you get over your fears of delegation and help your employees gain confidence as they learn by doing.

 

Step 3: Educate your employees

 

When you delegate a task, take the time to educate the employee about how the task fits into the company as a whole and why it matters. People want to feel that the work they’re doing is valuable.

 

You may need to create directions or process guides for certain tasks. Having written documentation of how to do things will help as your business grows. Make sure employees have the tools, information, and authority they need to do the job.

 

Clearly explain your expectations, deadlines, and deliverables and make sure the employee understands them.

 

Step 4: Stand back

 

It’s hard not to micromanage employees once you’ve handed off a job. Of course, some processes must be followed to the letter, but if a task offers leeway for creativity, don’t insist the person do it exactly as you would. You’ll be surprised how often an employee comes up with a way to do something faster or better—that’s one of the benefits of delegating.

 

Step 5: Provide feedback

 

Let employees know they can ask you questions at any time. Check in regularly to see how they’re handling the task and what they’ve learned.

 

If an employee messes up, your instinct might be to fix the work yourself or take the job back (“I knew no one could do it right!”). Instead, provide honest feedback. Helping the employee learn from their mistakes will save you time in the long run as they gain experience.

 

Step 6: Delegate for growth

 

If you trust no one else to do the difficult work, your business can’t expand beyond your capacity. Delegate increasingly more challenging tasks and watch both your employees and your business grow.

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky Headshot.png

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2018 Bank of America Corporation

If you’re having trouble finding qualified job candidates for your small business, you’re not alone. According to a survey by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and MetLife, 55 percent of small business owners are focusing more time and money on training existing employees because they can’t find qualified workers to hire. Eight in 10 are working longer or handling more duties to fill the void and 61 percent have asked existing employees to work more hours.

desk-discussing-discussion-1311518.jpg

 

Finding qualified job candidates starts with where you search. Here are the best places to find employees for your small business.

 

Online job boards

 

The secret to successfully listing jobs online is to choose the right job boards for your needs. If you want a high volume of candidates, Indeed.comis the best known and most popular job search site, and also lets you list jobs for free. Because of the volume of postings, however, your job might get lost so you’ll probably want to spend the money to promote your listing as a Sponsored job. You only pay per click, which helps keep this cost manageable.

 

GlassDoor and ZipRecruiter are also very popular mass job sites; however, they charge to post jobs. On both sites, you can choose a Standard plan where your job appears on the website, or a Premium plan where your jobs are included on job alert emails sent to jobseekers.

 

For a small business that doesn’t want hundreds of resumes, niche job boards can be a better option. Targeted to specific industries, they can deliver more focused results. Popular niche job boards include:

 

 

Outside the box (and around the world)

 

If you can’t find the talent you need in your community, look farther afield. Many jobs can be done remotely. You’ll have access to a much wider range of talent if you expand your job candidate search nationwide or even worldwide. Use We Work Remotely, FlexJobs, JustRemote,and Outsourcely to post remote jobs.

 

On social media

 

Sometimes the best candidates aren’t on job boards because they’re not actively seeking a job. Use social media to reach these “passive” job candidates. On LinkedIn, keep your eye out for people who might fit your needs, or use keywords related to the skills you need to find potential candidates. LinkedIn Recruiter Lite, designed for companies that hire only occasionally, lets you accessup to third-degree connections and gives you 30 free pieces of InMail per month to contact candidates. Another tactic is to post jobs on your Facebook Business Page, then use paid promotion on Facebook to boost their visibility to potential candidates.

 

At school

 

Looking for recent college graduates or entry-level employees? Contacting local colleges, high schools and trade/vocational schools is often a good way to find enthusiastic employees with up-to-the-moment skills. For example, if you’re looking for a marketing person, contact a local college with a strong marketing program.

 

Networking

 

Seeking job candidates in networking groups you belong to is a no-brainer, but why stop there? Find networking groups targeted to the role you want to fill (such as graphic designers or real estate agents) and see if any of their members are looking for a job.

 

Your employees

 

Promoting from within is a smart strategy for building employee loyalty. However, if you don’t have the necessary talent in-house, enlist your employees as recruiters. Have them spread the word that you’re looking to hire and offer a bonus for anyone who recommends a candidate that makes it through your probationary period.

 

Finding new hires isn’t easy—but by trying the routes above, you can boost your chances of discovering the perfect employee for your business.

 

     Read more about finding and retaining employees

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky Headshot.png

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2018 Bank of America Corporation

Do you ever have a great check-in with a team member and wish that there was an organic opportunity to publicly recognize their contributions to your business? You’re in luck. Employee Appreciation Day is right around the corner.

 

While Employee Appreciation Day is not a legally recognized holiday (nobody officially gets the day off) it can be a great opportunity for management to set aside time to show their staff how appreciated they are.

blackboard-board-close-up-908301.jpg

Employee Appreciation Day falls on the first Friday of March each year (so you still have lots of time to brainstorm special ways to thank your team). Here are some thought starters on how to celebrate with your company:

 

1. Go public: Consider posting about your employees’ great work on your website or social media pages – this is a fun and easy way to show your staff that you care. It can mean a lot to your team that you are willing to share your sentiments publicly.

 

Who doesn’t love some social media recognition these days?

 

2. Don’t underestimate the power of food: Food is a tried and true way to give thanks. Sure, it’s a little clichéd, but it never gets old – everyone loves coming to work and being greeted by an array of treats. And the communal nature of food can help get your employees away from their desks to spend a few celebratory moments together.

 

3. Ask them what they want: Before I started my first business, I met with a SCORE counselor and got what I still think was some of the best small business advice ever:

 

Ask them what they want, then give them what they want.

 

I have used that advice, and spread that gospel, for years, mostly as it pertains to customers. But the truth is, it applies equally well to your staff.

 

As simple as it may seem, asking your employees what would make them feel appreciated can go a long way in creating an authentic connection. Taking this kind of initiative shows you aren’t going through the motions to gain empty brownie points, but rather shows that you care whether or not they genuinely feel appreciated. This will not only make it easier for you to determine the best way to show your appreciation but also fosters a positive and respectful workplace environment.

 

4. Customize it: It may be easier to present all of your employees with the same thank you gift, but it would be significantly more thoughtful and effective to customize your gifts for individual employees if you are able.

 

Tapping into each employee’s interests or passions in choosing gifts shows that you have taken the time to get to know them as a unique individual. This could mean gifting tickets to a local sports event, gift cards that help them pursue their hobbies, a certificate for a meal at their favorite restaurant, etc.

 

5. Say thank you: Saying “thank you” is the easiest thing any of us can do, but also seems to be the thing that is easiest to forget amid the bustle of the workday. It is important to do this on Employee Appreciation Day, but more importantly, it is the smart entrepreneur who does their best to make saying thanks a daily practice.

 

Employee Appreciation Day is a great tradition to start, but what it really teaches us is that every day should be Employee Appreciation Day.

 

How do you show employees that you appreciate them?  Let us know in the comments below.

 

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.png

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss.

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

It’s the time of year when business is booming and holiday celebrations abound. During this busy season, employees at many small businesses work harder than ever. Whatever your industry—retail, service or B2B—the year-end rush is real.

adult-american-blond-1282268.jpg

 

Are you also remembering to celebrate your employees’ hard work?

 

Employee recognition is more than just a “nice thing to do.” Over two-thirds of HR professionals in an SHRM/Globoforce survey say employee recognition has a positive impact on employee retention. For small businesses in today’s competitive hiring landscape, that can make a big difference.

 

Here are 27 ideas for celebrating your staff’s hard work—at any time of the year.

 

Celebrate the individual.

 

Did one employee go above and beyond the call of duty? Treat them like a star.

 

    1. Give them their birthday off with pay.
    2. Buy them a comfy new ergonomic office chair or that standing desk they’ve been wanting.
    3. Give them a small budget to redecorate their office or workspace.
    4. Take them out to lunch.
    5. Buy them a tech tool that’s useful for work but also for fun, like noise-canceling headphones so they can focus (or listen to music).
    6. Say it with food. Give them a gift certificate to a favorite restaurant, pay for personal chef services for a night, or have a basket of their favorite dessert delivered to the office.
    7. Pay for a month’s worth of housecleaning or car detailing services.
    8. Give them the best parking space at work for a month. Put up a sign with their name on it in the space.
    9. Give them an all-expenses-paid weekend away with their significant other.
    10. Give them a gift card for a spa day or stress-relieving massage.
    11. Buy them tickets to an event they’ll enjoy, whether that’s a baseball game or the ballet.
    12. Pay for cooking lessons, golf lessons, dance lessons or whatever they want to learn.
    13. Write them a glowing LinkedIn recommendation.
    14. Give them a year’s subscription to a “something-of-the-month club.” You can find subscriptions for everything from food or cosmetics to neckties or coffee. 
    15. Buy them a membership to a local museum you know they’ll enjoy.

 

Celebrate the team.

 

Want to celebrate the achievements of a particular team, department or even the whole company? Make it a group gift or activity. (If your staff is mostly millennials, keep in mind they tend to prefer experiences to things.)

 

    1. Cater breakfast, lunch or dessert.
    2. Take the team out to lunch or dinner.
    3. Give everyone a comp day to take whenever they want.
    4. Knock off early and take the team to the movies. Buy everyone candy, popcorn and soda.
    5. Take the group to a sporting event.
    6. Go bowling.
    7. Play miniature golf.
    8. Have a paintball battle.
    9. Rent an ice skating or roller skating rink for the afternoon.
    10. Throw a party.
    11. If you think your team will like it, try something extreme. Take them zip lining, go bungee jumping or go for a ride in a hot-air balloon.
    12. Give everyone a bonus.

 

Rules for success

 

No matter what approach you take to celebrating your employees’ efforts, follow these three rules:

 

    1. Do it often. Don’t wait until the end of the year or annual review time to acknowledge hard work.
    2. Let employees have a voice in what kind of celebrations they want. Get ideas from your team to come up with a list of possibilities. Offer the employees you’re honoring a choice among different options.
    3. Be willing to invest. Put some money into employee recognition. According to an SHRM study, devoting at least 1 percent of payroll to an employee recognition program makes it more likely to be effective.

 

 

Read next:

 

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky Headshot.png

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2018 Bank of America Corporation

Millennial employees have a reputation as job hoppers. While that rep isn’t entirely undeserved, a new study by OC Tanner  reveals the problem isn’t millennials—it’s their jobs. Keep reading to find out what your company might be doing wrong and what you can do to retain your millennial employees.

 

Millennial misery by the numbers

 

The majority of millennials in the survey (60 percent) have worked at 2 – 4 companies. However, 24 percent have worked at five or more places.

 

Of course, many millennial employees are still in the early stages of their careers, when switching jobs is a natural way to explore options. But OC Tanner uncovered a vicious circle: The more often millennials switch jobs because they’re dissatisfied, the less satisfied they become. For instance:

Rieva_Article_Table.png

 

The growing dissatisfaction of millennial job-hoppers isn’t all that’s worrisome. When 20 percent of entry-level workers don’t trust their managers, and more than one-third are bored, feel stuck or believe work is damaging their health, there’s something seriously wrong.

 

Millennial retention tipsHow can you nip millennial job-hopping in the bud? It’s actually really easy to do. OC Tanner has identified six key aspects of company culture that people look for in a great place to work:

 

  • Purpose
  • Opportunity
  • Success
  • Appreciation
  • Wellbeing
  • Leadership

 

Companies that are even marginally better than average in these six categories enjoy a host of benefits, OC Tanner reports. Their employees are substantially more engaged. They’re more likely to be innovative. They have higher-than-average revenues. To boost your business “above average,” take these steps:Millennials have a lot to offer your business. Keep them happy at work, and their energy, passion and creativity will help power your company to new heights.

 

1. Purpose: Three-fourths of millennials in a Deloitte survey believe businesses have the potential to help solve society’s economic, environmental and social challenges—but just 47 percent believe businesses behave ethically, down from 62 percent last year. Give your employees a sense of purpose by clearly conveying your company’s vision and mission, how it contributes to making the world a better place, and the role their job plays in the big picture.

 

2. Opportunity: Even entry-level millennial employees want to strut their stuff. Give them ownership of a project or the opportunity to lead a group. Provide the tools and information they need, then let them take charge of the job.

 

3. Success: Providing growth opportunities helps millennial employees develop the skills they need for success. Be sure to celebrate both team and individual achievements.

 

4. Appreciation: Millennials crave feedback about their performance. Tell them how they’re doing daily, not just during performance reviews.

 

5. Wellbeing: Health insurance and flexible work schedules are two of the top benefits millennial employees want, Pentegra reports. See if your health insurance offers an employee wellness plan. Be open when employees want to adjust their work hours to accommodate not just family demands, but also personal passions such as traveling or training for a marathon.

 

6. Leadership: Two-way communication between management and millennial employees is essential to building trust. Transparency and honesty will help create bonds with millennial employees.

 

Millennials have a lot to offer your business. Keep them happy at work, and their energy, passion and creativity will help power your company to new heights.

 

Read next:

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky Headshot.png

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2018 Bank of America Corporation

 

Filter Article

By tag: