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It is no secret people today look for authenticity when buying from a business. employee feedback loop pic.jpg

 

This is especially true for millennials who expect their corporate partners to be real, genuine, to stand for something. The days of putting out a lame slogan and hoping to catch a few gullible pushovers is gone.

 

There are many reasons for this of course – the ubiquity of advertising, increased online transparency, the rise of micro-influencers, and so on, but the two biggest reasons are the Internet generally and social media specifically; we are living at a time when anyone has a platform to say anything and that means that feedback is immediate.

 

The rise of immediate feedback has had ripple effects in the office as well.

 

Not only do employees expect (and maybe even welcome) feedback, they also expect to be able to give it. Gone too are the days when a manager could threaten to put his cigarette out on my forehead and I would have no recourse. (A true, if sad, story.)

 

For employers, giving feedback has become almost critical, because feedback is a proven way to increase employee morale and engagement. And engagement needs increasing. Get this: According to Gallup, in 2019, only 35% of employees felt “engaged” (and that was a 20-year high). Maybe worse, 13% felt “actively disengaged.”

 

As such, many large companies are ditching the standard yearly review and instead are conducting what is being termed, a “continuous feedback loop.” A feedback loop essentially is an ongoing conversation between the employee and the employer as to how the worker is doing, feeling, performing and whether those things are meeting both parties’ expectations.

 

It begins with, of course, evaluating the employee’s work. One way to gauge this is to have SMART goals:

 

  • Specific

 

  • Measurable

 

  • Aligned

 

  • Relevant

 

  • Time-bound

 

The idea is to set clear expectations for the employee while concurrently giving the manager concrete objectives by which to evaluate the employee’s performance.

 

What these companies want, and what you should consider, is to create an ongoing, regular exchange of ideas that gives each side thoughtful feedback geared towards meeting company objectives.

 

The main difference here is that while the often-dreaded yearly performance review is just that – a yearly event – a continuous feedback loop is an ongoing process that allows both the manager and the worker to make small changes and course corrections as needed (as opposed to the more zero-sum process of a good or bad, up or down, yearly evaluation.) 

 

Therefore, to be successful, the feedback loop needs to be an ongoing process, otherwise it defeats the purpose. Indeed, a performance review for something that occurred many months in the past is likely of little value.

 

So, instead of the yearly written evaluation and sit-down, consider regular check-ins and one-on-ones between the boss/manager and the employee. These need not take long and can even be casual; they may even be better if kept more casual, as that makes it a more organic process.

 

For managers, this pivot should be welcome. With ongoing feedback being given, they can expect to put out fewer fires, have happier, more directed employees, and spend less time on “yearly evaluation week.”

 

For the worker, they should know better what is expected of them and can also expect happier higher-ups, given there will be less guessing, and happily, less second-guessing.

 

 

 

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Asksteve strauss headshot.png an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss.

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Steve Strauss.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

With the majority of new hires under the age of 39, what’s important to Millennials and Gen Zers needs to be important to your small business. parental leave pic.jpg

 

Not only are Millennials currently the largest generation in the workforce, but Gen Z is  the biggest generation on the planet, comprising 32% of the global population. That’s a lot of potential talent looking for workplaces offering benefits in sync with their lifestyles. And since these two generations are in their prime childbearing years, you can be sure they’re checking out your parental leave policy when deciding whether to work for you.

 

Millennials and Gen Zers are having children later in life. According to childcare marketplace Winnie.com, the younger generations feel by waiting to have children, they get more time to enjoy adulthood and become more established in their careers. The result is they have children when they’re ready. And, because for them parenthood is a deliberate decision, employees expect their workplaces to accommodate their needs for life/work balance.

 

Federal laws are lacking

 

More than a million millennials become new parents every year, according to Pew Research, but the United States remains the only country among 41 nations that does not mandate any paid leave for new parents. The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is more than 25 years old and seems sorely lacking in providing equality in the workplace, especially when it comes to being able to care for a newborn.

 

The FMLA merely provides “certain” employees with up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave per year—so employees won’t lose their jobs if they choose to stay home to care for a baby, but companies are not required to offer any compensation.

 

The issue of paid parental leave recently received a boost of attention when MSNBC anchor Katy Tur shared with her audience challenges following childbirth, including an underweight newborn, painful C-section, post-partum exhaustion and more. Tur used her spotlight to call out Congress for the “shameful” lack of federal paid family leave in America.

 

Although the FMLA was designed to “help employees balance their work and family responsibilities by allowing them to take reasonable unpaid leave for certain family and medical reasons,” without requiring companies to compensate employees, many workers must return to work earlier than desired to pay their bills.

 

Currently five states require companies to provide paid parental leave to certain employees.

 

For example, the 2019 California law called the New Parent Leave Act is for employers with at least 20 employees and enables some workers to take up to 12 weeks leave to take care of a new child (biological, adopted, or foster). There are some stipulations such as how long the employee has worked at the company and how many hours have been worked before the leave. Employers are also required to continue group health coverage during the leave and employees must be able to return them to the same jobs they had before they left. You can read more about California's short-term disability and paid leave programs.

 

The demand is real

 

While employees of any generation would consider switching jobs for better benefits, millennials and Gen Z want better parental leave policies for both genders and frequently, for non-traditional families. According to Glassdoor, it’s important for company benefits to reflect how inclusive the business is to all family scenarios.

 

Companies should consider not only providing paid parental leave for the traditional male/female partnership but also family and medical leave to care for domestic partners as well as the children of a domestic partner, regardless of biological status.

 

Perhaps because businesses understand providing paid maternity and paternity leave will help them attract and retain talent, 40% of companies in the U.S. now offer paid parental leave compared to only 25% in 2015. Big companies like NBC where Tur works, Microsoft and Bank of America offer generous parental leave policies. 

 

Small Business Tips for Paid Parental Leave

 

But, it’s hard for a smaller company to offer similar benefits. One way you can possibly “pay” for parental leave is as an extension of your state’s temporary disability insurance program. Small percentages of money are withdrawn from every employee’s paycheck and the leave is fully funded by the workers. Usually, the paid family leave insurance fund pays about two-thirds of the employee’s weekly pay. The benefits of paid parental leave are two-fold. Employees get the support they need to keep their jobs and start a family and employers benefit from workers who are more motivated, more productive, they have greater loyalty.

 

And call your Congressional representatives to ask for better, federally mandated parental leave policies.

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and entrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah. Rieva headshot.png

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide materials for informational purposes only, and is not responsible for, and does not guarantee or endorse any of the third-party products or services mentioned.  All third-party logos and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

It’s the phrase employers dread hearing from their employee: “Can we talk?” charles-rRWiVQzLm7k-unsplash.jpg

 

Often what follows is a request for a raise. As small businesses continue to struggle with retaining employees—this will likely come up more often in 2020.

 

If talking about raises has always been uncomfortable for you, knowing the right way to handle the conversation can leave you and your employees feeling satisfied and optimistic about your future working relationship.

 

But first, just how important are raises to employees?

 

Mo’ Money

 

According to a survey from Kelton Global, commissioned by QuickBooks Payroll, while health insurance and paid time off matter to employees, salary is important to showing how much you value them.

 

Not surprisingly, the survey shows 44% of small business employees are not satisfied with their pay and 49% of those surveyed complain their salaries haven’t kept up with the cost of living. And if they haven’t gotten a raise in the past year, 54% are not satisfied with their individual salaries and their overall compensation packages. Which of course leads to unhappy employees who believe they could be earning more money elsewhere (69%). More troubling, only 55% say they’d actually ask for a pay raise, so the first you’d know about their unhappiness with their salary, is when they quit.

 

Low salaries and financial worries are the leading causes of workplace stress, according to Dr. Greg Willard, a Harvard University professor and executive at Cangrade, a job candidate screening company. Stressed employees are usually less productive.

 

If you have been giving annual raises, don’t stop now. When asked what would happen if they didn’t get a raise this year, respondents said: They would immediately start looking for a new job (37%); request a meeting with the boss (30%); or ask for a new benefit to compensate (21%).

 

Bottom line, salary is important, and the survey shows more workers are motivated by making more money (41%) than by getting benefits (31%).

 

How Much is Enough?

 

You should arm yourself with competitive salary information. For an overview of salaries by industry and location, check out the Salary Data & Career Research Center (United States) or at Salary.com. To know what wages your competitors pay (those businesses who want to “steal” your employees), check out job offers on Indeed and Glassdoor.

 

It’s not a must to match the highest salary out there. Hopefully, there are other factors about working for your company that are an incentive for your employee to stay such as company culture, small perks, room for advancement, etc. Even a small raise might make the difference between keeping and losing a valued employee.

 

A  recent Indeed survey about how workers feel about their salaries revealed employees would like enough money to live comfortably. Only 18% said their lives are “comfortable” with their current salaries, the majority (61%) thought a boost of $6,000 would do the trick.

 

According to the Kelton Global study, of the respondents looking for a raise this year, 52% plan on asking for a 5% increase or less, 41% plan to ask for a 6% to 10% raise and 7% will ask for more than a 10% boost.

 

Having “The Talk”

 

It’s important to make the conversation as comfortable as possible. Don’t be defensive or standoffish as employees will feel your vibe and immediately believe you don’t feel they’re worthy of the conversation, let alone the raise.

 

Assume your employee has a number in mind and will likely come to the meeting with knowledge of competing salaries and an expectation. Be prepared to talk about other non-direct compensation perks.

 

If the salary increase is tied to a performance review, underperforming employees will be disappointed, so you need to offer examples of where performance lacked and future expectations. Conversely if the raise is substantial, the performance discussion should focus on the positive aspects of the employee’s performance.

 

Employees rarely think their raises are high enough. If business is tight, don’t alarm your employees, so they panic and immediately start looking for a new job. Be honest, saying, “business is tight right now, but in a few months we can consider another increase.”  Don’t say this if there’s no intention of following through.

 

No matter how hard the conversation may be for you as the boss, your employees trust you to respect and validate their value.

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Before I started the entrepreneurial chapter of my life, I managed a staff of 30 who ranged from recent college graduates to those nearing retirement. And, although they were atcowomen-pd5FVvQ9-aY-unsplash.jpg different life stages (and therefore had different motivations and goals), I tried to build a cohesive team that thought outside the box and worked collaboratively to build the best product possible.

 

Oh, there were some bad seeds every now and then, but I learned as you try to foster certain traits in your employees, you’ll be rewarded tenfold. I was always conscious of the bad bosses I’d had in my career and vowed to never be like them—creating a corporate “golden rule.”

 

These are the traits I found to be the most important to foster in employees.

 

1. Flexibility and adaptability

 

I believe in the “if it ain’t broke, break it” theory of management. Every so often I’d announce to my staff,  “let’s shake it up.” The end result was usually better—and even when it wasn’t, we still learned a valuable lesson.

 

For structured personalities, being flexible might be a difficult trait to learn. But, in a small business, everyone needs to be flexible enough to handle difficult situations and adaptable enough to come up with solutions.

 

The American Psychological Association reports there are three types of adaptability:

  • Cognitive: the way one thinks
  • Emotional: the way one feels
  • Behavioral: the way one acts

 

The idea is to make employees, well, comfortable with being pushed out of their comfort zone. Once they are, you end up with a team able to handle new challenges without flipping into crisis mode.

 

It’s important to lead by example when unpredictable events occur. Be calm and discuss possible solutions with your team. By showing your staff how compromise, collaboration and calmness can prevail, you’re modeling how to handle future challenges.

 

2. Perseverance

 

As an entrepreneur you know the road to success is fraught with setbacks. You won’t succeed without having the “grit” to persevere and keep moving and the resiliency to bounce back when obstacles appear.

 

Fostering the same attitudes in your employees is just as important. When you assign a large or difficult project to an employee, explain the goal and the difficulty. Offer encouragement and support. Commiserate when needed. (I found feeding my staff kept them going). Fostering perseverance results in confident, resourceful and self-reliant workers who take pride in their work.

 

3. Self-confidence

 

You probably learned this on the playground in elementary school, but the more insecure a person is, the less willing they are to work with others and the more disruptive they are to your business. Sometimes insecurity in the workplace can lead to a toxic environment that breeds distrust and unhealthy competition. My most self-confident employees were the ones more willing to share and encourage others.

 

Some people are seemingly born confident, but it’s possible to “breed” confidence in those who lack it. One way to do that—recognition. Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report shows how “recognition motivates employees, gives them a sense of accomplishment and makes them feel appreciated for their work.”

 

The report says the “act of recognition also sends messages to other employees about what success looks like. In this way, recognition is both a tool for personal reward and an opportunity to reinforce the desired behavior to other employees.”

 

Being acknowledged for a job well-done instills self-confidence and encourages employees to accept more responsibility and greater challenges going forward. Adding a small reward (a $25 gift card; a comp day) encourages people to work harder.

 

Today’s business owners are worried about employee attraction and retention. Many businesses are focusing on the attraction part while ignoring the retention aspect. But making employees a valuable part of your team, fostering these traits and empowering them can lead to a better business with less turnover and more profitability.

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Do you have a business expense reimbursement horror story? I bet you do. We all do. master-card-debit-card-210742.jpg

 

My latest is with a well-known company for whom I speak at events every year. The accounts payable people know me. I’m in the system. I’ve been submitting invoices to them for years. And yet, even so, last year it took five months to get my travel expenses for an event reimbursed.

 

I get it – I’m a small fish in a very large pond, but still. Imagine if I were an employee trying to get repaid for expenses I incurred on behalf of the company. I would not be a happy camper.

 

This issue is especially relevant for small businesses. Employees and accounting folk equally seem to dislike expense reports and reporting. One common solution then is to give company credit cards to appropriate staff members.

 

This intuitively makes sense, but does it work in actuality? Consider the pros and cons:

 

Pro: Ease of use. Let’s face it – expense reports are a pain in the rear for everyone. Employees don’t like filling them out (even if they are digital) and often do so late, and management often does not prioritize paying them. Expense reports take up time and eat up resources.

 

Giving employees credit cards may remove the need for cumbersome expense reports. And equally, it is easy for the bookkeeping team to review credit card bills and charges online. All in all, credit cards can make everyone’s lives easier.

 

Con: Overspending. Because the point of a credit card is to make spending easier, some employees may abuse that privilege.  Check with your credit card company to see if they offer employee misuse protection.

 

Watch this video about managing a credit line for your corporate credit card.

 

Pro: Happier, appreciative employees. On the other hand, having a company credit card makes taking clients out to dinner easy. Indeed, it can be stressful for some staff members to entertain clients or buy expensive items on their own dime, knowing it may take time to be reimbursed. Removing that stress will be much appreciated.

 

Similarly, the time savings of not having to fill out expense reports – and not having to wait to get them paid – will be very welcome as well.

 

Con: Comingling. Another downside is that, because using a company card is in fact so easy, it can sometimes be too easy for employees to accidentally (or accidentally on purpose) mix personal and business expenses. As such, two things are critical:

 

  • The employee must be someone you inherently trust
  • You need to remember the immortal words of Ronald Reagan about the Soviet Union regarding the SALT arms control treaty: “Trust but verify.” It will be incumbent on your bookkeeper to keep close tabs on credit card expenses.

 

For the employer, one benefit is that expense monitoring can be done more easily. Checking online for what has been charged can be done effortlessly, quietly, and as often as desired.

 

Learn how to easily manage your business with account alerts.

 

Pro: Card benefits. These days, credit card rewards are common, often generous, and so, if employees are using cards for company expenses, those card benefits will go to the business.

 

All in all, while there are definitely some risks to consider, they usually can be mitigated fairly easily and as such, the pros of issuing company credit cards usually outweigh the cons.

 

Next: Find the credit card to fit your business needs.

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert Steve+Strauss+Headshot+SBC.pngcolumn is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss.

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2017 Bank of America Corporation

Let’s say you hired a great team, operations are going smoothly and all your employees are thriving. You lean back in your chair, relax and say, “My job here is done.”  woman-sharing-her-presentation-with-her-colleagues-3153198.jpg

Soon your stellar team starts lagging and the quality of work no longer meets your expectations. Rather than hire new employees, which can be time-consuming and costly, you may start asking yourself “How can I motivate my team members?”

 

There are many ways to motivate employees that are not just focused on rewards and incentives. Here are five ways to bring the spark back and help boost performance.

 

1. Acknowledging good work – A simple thank you can go a long way. By showing an employee you notice the good work he/she is putting in, you inspire them to keep it up. You can also upgrade your typical ‘thank you for your hard work’ and go public by posting about your employees’ great work on your website or social media channels. With this extra step, you create a sense of appreciation and value in your employee.

 

2. Opportunity to grow – Knowing there are opportunities for promotion, employees are self-motivated to become more adept at their job. Take time to work with them to define a career path, and provide an overview of what their options are.

 

3. Encourage breaks – Create a work environment where it’s advised to take short breaks from working at a desk. Encourage going outside for fresh air or getting up to stretch and recharge. Another option is to Incorporate sit-stand desks that get employees moving while working. Texas A&M University research found employees using them are up to 46 percent more productive.

 

4. Provide external learning – Offering opportunities for employees to attend paid training sessions, lectures or networking events is a great way to help grow skills to further develop their career. In return, having a knowledgeable employee will benefit the business. Also, attending sessions and trainings is a great way to break up the day-to-day monotony.

 

5. Accept differences – Every employee is different. What works for one, might not work for another. Getting to know the people working for you is critical for having motivated employees. Acknowledging the individuality of each member on your team, and knowing that people are inspired by different things, is a vital step in effectively motivating employees.

 

So, take some time to grab coffee with your employees, ask them how they’re doing and find out what makes them happy. The benefits you reap from open communication far outweigh the costs of finding that extra time. 

 

Additional Reading

When you’re looking to build your workforce, you want to hire the best people you can find. The greater the talent you can recruit, the more you’ll get for your earnings and the filip-bunkens-MfA21vhkVLg-unsplash.jpgfaster your business will grow.

 

But that search used to come with a powerful limit: you could only hire the best people you could find within a small area near your office. A software developer with exactly the experience you need or a copywriter with a style that’s perfect for your business is of no use if they’re a long commute away. Relocation is expensive and risky.

That means you’re fishing in a small pond—and if that pond is a long way from cities or creative hubs, it might not contain the fish you need.

The solution has come in the form of remote work. When a team member needs nothing more than a computer and an Internet connection to perform their tasks and submit their work, they don’t need to be in an office down the hall. They can be on the other side of the country, or even in a different country altogether, and still provide the benefits of their skill and talent.

 

According to one study, remote working has grown by 44 percent over the last five years. Around 4.3 million people in the U.S. work from home at least half the time, and 76 percent of respondents said that they wanted to telecommute all the time. Remote workers get a flexible schedule and save commuting time; companies get to hire the best people anywhere in the world and enjoy a 25 percent lower turnover.

 

But remote working isn’t like a more typical in-office environment. The work is performed without a boss present to check work or answer questions. There are no watercooler chats or colleagues to bounce ideas off. And the work hours are whatever the team member wants to create to suit their lifestyle.

 

Find the Right People

 

The first challenge in building a remote team is hiring the right people.

 

Remote workers need the right skills you’re looking for to complete their tasks but they also need to self-manage. They need to be self-motivated, responsible and dedicated. They need to have the mindset of entrepreneurs running their own businesses, even when that business only has one customer and pays them a salary.

 

That’s why a trial period is important to make sure not just that they can do the job but that they can be relied upon to do it—and to do it on time consistently and to be available for communications.

 

Agree on Collaboration Tools

 

As the team grows, you’ll also need to decide how you’re going to work together. Every office is different, and every worker has their own preference. Some might prefer to use Word, others Google Docs. Some might be used to uploading their files to Dropbox, others to Microsoft’s OneDrive.

 

Lisette Sutherland, author of Work Together Anywhere: A Handbook on Working Remotely—Successfully—for Individuals, Teams, and Managers, recommends giving each remote team member an agreement that lists the tools they prefer to use for each type of work and asking how they like to communicate. Team members can say whether they prefer to send quick messages through a chat application like Slack or just use email. They can state how quickly they tend to reply and how often they like to set up a video conference, and which video conferencing software they prefer to use.

 

Each team member will have their preference so it will then be up to the team leader or the employer to review their suggestions and lay out the rules everyone will follow. No one will end up with all their preferences but everyone will understand how the team will work together.

 

You can also set up times to meet in person. Few things help more to bond a long-term team than the ability to occasionally get together and swap ideas. Even if it only happens once or twice a year at a conference, those meetings can help to smooth out work for the year ahead.

 

A remote team is now too valuable a benefit to reject because it’s untraditional. Businesses as large as Basecamp, Automattic, and MySQL are now entirely virtual or close to it. It works, and it means that you can build a successful business with the best team even if you live somewhere remote.

 

About Joel Comm

 

As an Internet pioneer, Joel has been creating profitable websites, software, products, and helping entrepreneurs succeed since 1995. He has Screen+Shot+2019-02-08+at+9.16.44+AM.pngbeen at the frontlines of live video online since 2008 and has a deep expertise in using tools such as Facebook Live, Periscope, Instagram or Snapchat to broadcast a clearly defined message to a receptive audience or leveraging the power of webinar and meeting technologies.

 

Joel is a New York Times best-selling author of 15 books, including “The AdSense Code,” “Click Here to Order: Stories from the World’s Most Successful Entrepreneurs,” “KaChing: How to Run an Online Business that Pays and Pays and Twitter Power 3.0.” He is Co-Host of The Bad Crypto Podcast one of the top crypto-related shows in the world and has spoken before thousands of people around the world and seeks to inspire, equip and entertain.

 

Web: https://joelcomm.com/ or Twitter: @JoelComm

Read more from Joel Comm

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Joel Comm to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Joel Comm is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Joel Comm. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

For any kind of business, the best kind of marketing is word-of-mouth. You want your company to be the subject of conversations. You want people to talk about what you’re doing, what you’re selling and how you’re selling it. The more people hear about you, the more people will buy from you.

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Best of all, you have an army of people who have a deep understanding of your business. They like your business… and they each have an untapped audience that would like to know more about your company.

 

According to research by LinkedIn, a typical company’s employees have a network ten times larger than the firm’s social media follower base. LinkedIn found that when businesses ask their employees to share job openings on social media, companies see 30 percent more job applications, and the applicants who arrive through a friend’s recommendation have a 37 percent lower initial attrition rate.

 

Tapping into that network doesn’t just bring better recruits. It can also bring more sales and greater brand recognition. It’s a way to communicate your company’s identity and message to a whole new audience through passionate storytellers who know your company best.

 

To make use of that army of advocates, you’ll need to take three steps:

 

1. Prepare Your Message

 

Urging your employees to talk about work on social media will mean taking a risk. You won’t be able to check every post before it goes out or monitor every conversation that takes place. Micromanaging posts will reduce participation and lower authenticity. You’ll need to trust your workforce to communicate the messages you want to broadcast while still allowing them to be their authentic selves.

 

Before encouraging your staff to advocate on your company’s behalf, draw up guidelines. List your company values. Provide examples of stories that they could share. Make clear that there are some topics—such as customer data or complaints—they shouldn’t discuss. There may even be compliance or legal issues that restrict what people can say. Your employees should be aware of them.

 

Give your team plenty of latitude so that they can have fun, display personality and talk about the things they want to discuss. But do take the time to build a framework so that the conversations they’re having are positive, inviting, and always show the company in a good light.

 

2. Encourage Participation

 

Your company will benefit when your employees are advocating your business to their social media audiences. The employees also benefit by entertaining their followers with fun stories and interesting content. But their rewards should be bigger than that.

 

That doesn’t have to mean compensating employees directly for social content and engagement. Paying employees to be advocates risks authenticity. The best social media content always comes from individuals saying what’s on their minds rather than from professional PR people saying what they’re being paid to repeat.

 

But you can certainly incentivize them through programs like awarding a prize to the employee who lands the highest number of shares or who posts the most content each month. You can also point out that discussing their work on their social media streams can be a path into professional social media work, a channel that you can promote with coaching that benefits both your business and your employees. And you can remind your team that engaging on social media, sharing content, and talking about the issues they encounter in their work builds their own credibility. When they’re thinking professional thoughts aloud online, they look like experts.

 

3. Measure the Results

 

Finally, you should be measuring the results. You should monitor the number of posts your team makes, and the number of shares and likes they receive. Above all, check the impact the content has on your business. You should find that as conversations spread, you see a growth in the number of newsletter subscriptions, more hits on your website, and more orders. Surveys should show a greater degree of brand recognition so that when you launch or offer a new product, you pick up more interest and more sales.

 

Those measures shouldn’t be the only reason you urge your employees to become advocates. A general, positive impression of your business is hard to measure even though it’s still worth having. But it is rewarding to seeing how that advocacy is affecting your bottom line.

 

Your employee networks are a huge, untapped resource. They’re a path towards greater brand recognition and exponential growth. Tapping that resource will take a little training and a lot of trust. But it can bring huge rewards for you, your company, your employees—and your new customers.

 

About Joel Comm

 

As an Internet pioneer, Joel has been creating profitable websites, software, products, and helping entrepreneurs succeed since 1995. He has Screen+Shot+2019-02-08+at+9.16.44+AM.pngbeen at the frontlines of live video online since 2008 and has a deep expertise in using tools such as Facebook Live, Periscope, Instagram or Snapchat to broadcast a clearly defined message to a receptive audience or leveraging the power of webinar and meeting technologies.

 

Joel is a New York Times best-selling author of 15 books, including “The AdSense Code,” “Click Here to Order: Stories from the World’s Most Successful Entrepreneurs,” “KaChing: How to Run an Online Business that Pays and Pays and Twitter Power 3.0.” He is Co-Host of The Bad Crypto Podcast one of the top crypto-related shows in the world and has spoken before thousands of people around the world and seeks to inspire, equip and entertain.

 

Web: https://joelcomm.com/ or Twitter: @JoelComm

Read more from Joel Comm

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Joel Comm to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Joel Comm is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Joel Comm. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

As the holidays approach, your employees may have visions of bonus checks dancing in their heads. But whether or not to give your small business employees a holiday bonus depends on several factors, including your employees’ expectations, your own generosity and your business’s financial situation.

Here’s what to consider when deciding whether to give out bonuses.

 

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A previous employer taught me that once you start giving holiday bonuses, you can’t stop. What’s more, you need to keep the bonuses at a comparable level from year to year. If you give everyone a $1,000 cash bonus three years in a row, then suddenly drop to a $25 Starbucks gift card the fourth, you won’t win any fans among your staff.

If this is the first year you will be giving employee bonuses, set reasonable expectations. Even if your business is having a great year, huge bonuses can set a bar you may not be able to meet going forward.

 

Consider starting with a small, base bonus you feel confident you can continue offering in the coming years. Then add extras, such as gift cards or holiday turkeys, depending on company performance.

 

How to Give Holiday Bonuses

 

While performance bonuses are often reserved for managers, holiday bonuses should be given to everyone. If you feel certain levels of workers deserve bigger bonuses, you should still make the amount consistent. For example, you could give everyone a cash bonus that’s a percentage of their salary or equivalent to a week’s pay.

Unlike performance-based bonuses, holiday bonuses should have no strings attached. They’re simply a gesture of goodwill and a way to spread holiday cheer.

If you do give out performance-based bonuses, consider doing so in January to keep them separate from holiday bonuses.

 

What to Give as a Holiday Bonus

 

There are several options for holiday bonuses; consider one or a combination of these.

 

  • Cash: Cash is king for the holiday bonus. Everyone can use cash and employees will appreciate a little extra help paying for holiday gifts. 29% of business owners look forward to providing employees holiday perks or bonuses says BofA’s 2019 Fall Small Business Owner Spotlight.
  • Gift cards: When giving gift cards as part of your bonuses, look for those that appeal to the widest possible audience. For example, everyone needs to buy food, so grocery store gift cards are a good bet. Gift cards to Amazon, Target or similar major retailers are also likely to be appreciated. You may be able get gift cards at a discount online or at membership discount stores.
  • Time off: If your budget, industry, and business allow for it, consider closing your office the week before New Year’s while still paying employee salaries. Your team will come back rested and ready to work. If that’s not realistic, giving employees a day or two off with pay, or letting them leave early on Fridays during December, is a nice reward to help them manage their holiday schedules.

 

Giving a holiday party or giving employees gifts are nice gestures, but they don’t really replace the holiday bonus. A party is more of a group celebration, and gifts may miss the mark. A holiday bonus, in contrast, is sure to be appreciated.

 

How do you plan to reward your employees this holiday season?

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Whether you’re a retailer, a manufacturer or own a seasonal business such as a ski resort, now is the time you may need more hands to meet seasonal customer demand. For example, retail job openings typically start accelerating in early September and peak in mid-October, according to job search site Glassdoor.

 

Yet if hiring has already peaked, does that mean all the best employees are already taken? No. If you still need seasonal workers despite the late date, follow these steps to find them. women-s-white-collared-long-sleeved-shirt-3170928.jpg

 

Make your jobs more appealing

 

It’s a job seeker's market, and lots of companies are competing for seasonal workers. Thanks to a strong economy and optimistic holiday sales projections, Glassdoor expects seasonal holiday hiring to rise by about 4% compared to last year. Target, UPS, Amazon and Kohl’s are just a few of the big companies hiring seasonal employees, and they’re offering good pay and perks to attract workers.

 

Start by making sure your pay is competitive. If earning holiday pay and overtime are options for your seasonal workers, promote that too. Highlight any perks, such as performance bonuses, employee discounts or flexible hours. Are you looking for workers who can stay on after the holidays? Then promote the opportunity to transition to full-time work.

 

Ask your existing employees to spread the word

 

Desirable employees tend to have friends with similar habits and work ethics. Let your employees know that you’re looking for seasonal workers. Consider offering a referral bonus if an employee refers someone you end up hiring.

 

Reach out to previous seasonal employees

 

Go back to your employment records to find some of your top seasonal workers from years past. Contact them to see if they’re looking for work again.

 

Get social

 

Loyal customers can be great employees, so use your social media accounts and your website to let people know you’re hiring. Also spread the word on community-based social media sites such as NextDoor or your town’s Facebook group. People often turn to community sites for leads on jobs.

 

Give them a sign

 

It’s old fashioned, but it still works: Put up a sign to let people know you’re hiring. My local Target and Kohl’s both have big sandwich boards out front advertising seasonal jobs, with a number to text for more information. You can do the same. Do you have delivery vehicles or company cars? Put magnetic signage advertising you’re hiring on the vehicles.

 

Think outside the box

Teenagers and college students aren’t your only resource for seasonal workers. Stay-at-home moms and retirees often want to earn extra money around the holidays. Advertise on job sites that specialize in these markets such as RetireeWorkforce, Workforce50, Women’s Job List or FlexJobs. Snag is a popular job search site specializing in hourly workers. You can also contact local groups catering to those demographics, such as retiree groups, PTAs or parents’ groups, and let them know you’re looking for seasonal workers.

 

Consider a staffing agency

 

When your business is hitting its busy season, writing and placing job ads and scanning responses is the last thing you have time for. Outsourcing to a staffing agency specializing in temporary workers takes these headaches off your hands. You will pay more for these employees since the staffing agency will take a cut. However, you’ll save time and can rest assured the staffing agency has handled background checks, references and other steps involved in finding qualified candidates who can hit the ground running.

 

Finding qualified seasonal employees can be a big challenge for a small business. By taking these steps to widen your search, you’ll find the workers you need so you can benefit from all that the busy season has to offer.

 

 

About Rieva Lesonsky

 

Rieva Lesonsky is CEO and Co-founder of GrowBiz Media, a custom content and media company focusing on small business and Rieva+Lesonsky+Headshot.pngentrepreneurship, and the blog SmallBizDaily.com. A nationally known speaker and authority on entrepreneurship, Rieva has been covering America’s entrepreneurs for more than 30 years. Before co-founding GrowBiz Media, Lesonsky was the long-time Editorial Director of Entrepreneur Magazine. Lesonsky has appeared on hundreds of radio shows and numerous local and national television programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America, CNN, The Martha Stewart Show and Oprah.

 

Lesonsky regularly writes about small business for numerous websites and for corporations targeting entrepreneurs. Many organizations have recognized Lesonsky for her tireless devotion to helping entrepreneurs. She served on the Small Business Administration’s National Advisory Council for six years, was honored by the SBA as a Small Business Media Advocate and a Woman in Business Advocate, and received the prestigious Lou Campanelli award from SCORE. She is a long-time member of the Business Journalists Hall of Fame.

 

Web: www.growbizmedia.com or Twitter: @Rieva

You can read more articles from Rieva Lesonsky by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Rieva Lesonsky to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Rieva Lesonsky is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Rieva Lesonsky. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice.

 

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Finding a new hire for your small business is challenging while finding the right hire is even more difficult.

 

A great team is what creates a great business. That's why asking the right questions during the interview process is critical.

 

Here are the top five questions to consider to find the perfect candidate for your business:

 

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  1. Why did you choose to leave your past employer? Knowing the reasons why a candidate left a job will show if they’re well suited and can thrive in your company’s work environment.
  2. Why do you want to work here? This will show how much time and research the candidate put into preparing for the interview and whether their career aspirations align with your company. But asking this question requires you to know exactly what it is you want in an employee and what the job will entail. You can’t find the perfect employee if you haven’t clearly defined the job.
  3. Do you perform the best working in teams or alone? This question will determine how the candidate prefers to work and can be a clue as to what kind of teammate they will be. After all, someone who enjoys solitary work and long stretches of uninterrupted time at their desk may not thrive in a position that requires collaboration or multi-tasking.
  4. What are the two most satisfying accomplishments in your career? Tell me about each. According to Glassdoor, asking about an important career achievement gives you a look into their values and what has had an impact on them. Knowing the values of an employee is crucial in running a successful business. Businesses are not monolithic. They are made up of people – people who do business with other people. So, having similar values creates a smooth and productive working environment.
  5. Do you have any questions for me? Time to see if they’ve been paying attention! Someone who has been paying close attention to you and to the flow of the interview will come up with a question to further enrich the conversation.  Not to mention, a candidate who is passionate about the position and is interested in the company will certainly have a question or two.

 

Related Articles:

Do you attract great employees?

 

Watch Bank of America Merchant Services’ “Works like a charm” hiring webinar to find out how.

 

“Works like a charm: Learn how to hire and retain great staff” was created to help small businesses tackle one of the most time-consuming tasks you can face, employee management. With unemployment at its lowest level in decades and new trends in online applications, these hiring and retention best practices can help give you a leg up on employee management.

 

Key topics covered in the webinar include:

  • Hiring in the digital age
  • Using tools and strategies to retain excellent employees
  • Empowering your employees

 

To watch the replay, click here.

What can your business do to ensure your workplace is friendly to the women in your workforce?

 

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InHerSight, a website that allows women to anonymously rate how female-friendly their workplaces are, collected data on what makes an ideal work environment for women. These are the top four qualities for a female-friendly work environment:

 

1. Paid time off: Even as society works toward a more equitable division of labor in the office and at home, providing paid time off is critical for women to know that their workplace values their responsibilities outside of the their job. Paid time off allows employees to take a sick day without stress, to stay at home with a sick child if needed, or simply to ensure  vacation time with the kids.

 

Paid time off also includes paid maternity leave. For businesses with 50 employees or more, the federal Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides “up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a 12-month period to care for a newborn, adopted or foster child, or to care for a family member, or to attend to the employee’s own serious medical health condition.”

 

The FMLA rules may not cover your small business, but even so, giving female employees a paid maternity leave shows your commitment to their well-being and acknowledges the many stresses and complications that can come with building a family. And when your business cares for its workers, they will care for you.

 

2. Salary satisfaction: One of the key work issues for women is closing the gender pay gap, i.e., where men who have the same job titles as women are paid higher salaries. For women to know that their time is just as valuable and they are doing their jobs well as their male counterparts, you must make sure that a gender pay gap doesn’t exist in your company.

 

3. Culture: Due to historical power imbalances in the professional space, women often are focused on an office culture and how employees and management treat each other. According to the InHerSight survey, this includes being treated in “respectful, professional, and unbiased” ways. There are several different types of policies in the office you can set up in order to make this happen. They include:

 

a) Zero-tolerance harassment policies. To ensure women feel supported by management, creating a zero-tolerance policy toward any type of harassment is critical. This allows all employees to know they can be in an office environment where they can be free of any fear of verbal or sexual harassment while they work.

 

b) Bias training. Women often experience gender bias in the workplace, where their skills and knowledge are second-guessed. Workplace discrimination based on sex is a huge barrier to women feeling comfortable in the office, so training your workforce on how to avoid gender bias is crucial in creating a good workplace culture.

 

c) Mentorship programs. Women often have a more difficult time being recruited or promoted in the office. Mentorship programs, by women and for women, allow for those in senior positions to help women below them ask questions, get guidance, and further their careers with the help of someone who has been there.

 

4. Flex-time: Allowing  flexible work hours is a great way to make your office attractive to new employees and current ones alike. Instead of everyone working a required 9 - 5, letting employees work later on some days and leave earlier on others provides flexibility many appreciate.

 

Working remotely is another perk to help working parents spend more time with their families.

 

At the end of the day, none of these policies are difficult to implement  and  would be very welcome by your team.

 

Check out our Spotlight on Women Entrepreneurs for a collection of articles highlighting how to embrace the unique challenges women face and thrive as small business owners.

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

How do you go from small to big, or if not big, then at least bigger?

 

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That question vexes many a small business person. Is it a matter of simply executing a good plan? Yes, but it’s more than that. Is it having a great idea? Partially. A better mousetrap? Maybe, sometimes.

 

But really, it is more than that, and simpler.

 

For any business to scale and get bigger, the journey begins with a single employee. Indeed, if you are going to grow, you need help, period. A great team is what creates a great business.

 

Here’s how to effectively hire that first person:

 

1. Plan: Probably the hardest part for solopreneurs is giving up control. Often it is not that they don't want to share the power, but rather, they just don’t know how. Figuring out what to let go of is a challenge.

 

The secret is to sit down, make a list of those things that you do which mustbe done by you (client acquisition for instance) and which things can and should be done by someone else (sales for example.) Then make a list of what the new person will do.

 

Then figure out how much you can pay the person, what their hours will be, where and how they will work, and what all of their other duties will be. Create a written job description.

 

2. Cast your net: Let your network know you are looking to hire and post the job description on job sites and even local colleges. This will ensure that you get a wide variety of applicants.

 

Learn the best sources for hiring talent, according to Rieva Lesonsky

 

3. Sort: Of course, you want someone with experience and smarts, but think outside the box a bit too. What elseis important to you? Is it skills, personality, connections or what? Pick people to interview who seem great, but who also may intrigue you just because.

 

4. Interview: Look for people who have the skills, smarts, background and experience, and with whom you connect. Ask yourself: Would I like to spend 8 hours a day with them?

 

5. Make it legal: Make sure you have an Employer Identification Number from the IRS. All employers must have one.

 

Next, have your attorney draft an employment contract. Be sure your contract states that the employee is “at-will” – meaning they can be fired at any time for any legal reason – so that there is no implied long-term promise of employment.

 

You also need to set up payroll. Will you do it by hand (the least expensive) or hire a service (the easiest)? How often will you pay them? Also, check with your state labor commission to see what posters you are legally required to hang.

 

6. Fill out the forms: There are plenty of forms you and your new employee must submit:

 

    • Federal law says you must report new employees within 20 days of hiring them. State laws might be shorter.
    • Each employee must fill out Form W-4.
    • If you work in a state with income tax, they need to also fill out a form for state tax withholding.
    • Also, have them fill out a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, certifying they are legally eligible to work in the United Sates.

 

Good luck, it is a lot of work, but it should be worth it.

 

     Read next:

 

About Steve Strauss

 

Steve Strauss Headshot New.pngSteven D. Strauss is one of the world's leading experts on small business and is a lawyer, writer, and speaker. The senior small business columnist for USA Today, his Ask an Expert column is one of the most highly-syndicated business columns in the country. He is the best-selling author of 17 books, including his latest, The Small Business Bible, now out in a completely updated third edition. You can also listen to his weekly podcast, Small Business SuccessSteven D. Strauss

 

Web: www.theselfemployed.com or Twitter: @SteveStrauss

You can read more articles from Steve Strauss by clicking here

 

Bank of America, N.A. engages with Steve Strauss to provide informational materials for your discussion or review purposes only. Steve Strauss is a registered trademark, used pursuant to license. The third parties within articles are used under license from Steve Strauss. Consult your financial, legal and accounting advisors, as neither Bank of America, its affiliates, nor their employees provide legal, accounting and tax advice. Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC.  ©2019 Bank of America Corporation

Join Bank of America Merchant Services on Oct. 7 or Oct. 8, 2019, to hear about the latest hiring tactics for small businesses. The educational webinar will focus on hiring and retention best practices in the digital age, and will feature industry expert Rebecca Dodgen, People Operations Leader at Homebase.

 

Session topics will include:

  • Hiring in the digital age
  • Using tools and strategies to retain excellent
    employees
  • Empowering your employees
  • Live Q&A with Homebase

 

Date:

Choose from two times. The same content will be covered in both sessions.

 

  • Monday, October 7 from 3 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. ET

 

  • Tuesday, October 8 from 11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.ET

 

To register for the Bank of America Merchant Services “Works like a charm” webinar, click here.

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